$250 for this Pro's Pro/Eagnas Stringer?

norcal

Legend
One of my tennis circle is moving to FL and doesn't want to take his stringer. He emailed the group and is asking $250.

I have been using my trusty Klippermate for over 30 years (probably 1k frames!); these days only string 2-3 a month.

Great deal or stick with the Klip?

All, I have a manual EAGNAS Stringer for sale, an $800-900 machine new and its probably about 9 years old?. It's very similar to the Eagnas combo 900 LE..
take a look at attached pics.
Would depart with it for $250..
Don't want to haul it to florida.

 

jim e

Legend
Looks like it has nice base clamps.
For the price, it is a large improvement over your floating clamp drop weight.
No signs of rust, so evidently it was kept in a good environment.
As long as it is functioning, Get it.$250 seems like a good price.
It will make your stringing much more enjoyable, besides cutting down on the time it takes to string.
 
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norcal

Legend
Thanks for your input, Jim. Yeah he says it's in good shape - I know he's been a dubs specialist for a while now and just strings for himself so it hasn't seen too much use. And yeah stringing has not been fun for me for quite a while now so this would be a lot better (I've strung on a floor crank before and it was like heaven comparatively lol). Sounds like a no brainer.

@LOBALOT - I searched 'eagnas 900' and it was such a sh*tshow I figured I'd ask this forum since there are so many knowledgeable stringers on here.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
@norcal this is the machine I was using. It was just really rickety with parts all loose and cobbled together.

The last straw was when this part snapped while stringing and the plastic nut went whizzing by my head.

The good news is I called the Eagnas guy and while he put me through all sorts of gyrations I was able to buy a replacement before returning the machine to its owner.

Ohh... And please excuse the messy basement!

 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
@LOBALOT
Your machine is quite different. The arms do not rotate inward. The 6 and 12 are screw down holders.

@norcal
I agree with Jim. I have a similar Eagnas machine and never had a problem. It’ll be faster to mount and the base clamps will be an improvement on the floating clamps. The difference is I’m now using a Wise and I also bought gravity release base clamps as mine were cone lock.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
@LOBALOT
Your machine is quite different. The arms do not rotate inward. The 6 and 12 are screw down holders.

@norcal
I agree with Jim. I have a similar Eagnas machine and never had a problem. It’ll be faster to mount and the base clamps will be an improvement on the floating clamps. The difference is I’m now using a Wise and I also bought gravity release base clamps as mine were cone lock.
Yes you are right. It had been a while since I have looked at/used it. You had to kind of pick the appropriate hole for the side support and then tighten it down. That said I still wouldn't but it depends on ones risk tolerance and patience.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
Yes you are right. It had been a while since I have looked at/used it. You had to kind of pick the appropriate hole for the side support and then tighten it down. That said I still wouldn't but it depends on ones risk tolerance and patience.
Definitely an upgrade to a Klipperusa. While I personally enjoy using a Klipperusa or X2, the consistency one can get from a crank machine is better and easier to attain.

The price point is such that he could likely recoup all of his $250 back if he changes his mind later, make $50-100 if he’s more patient with selling it, or collect half of it by selling his Klipperusa for $125.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
I just zoomed and and see you’re getting one of those weaving tools too. That’s got to be worth something.
 

Steve Huff

G.O.A.T.
The only thing I can say about Eagnas' 3 tooth clamps is they "look" like the old Babolat clamps. I bought some, even had a machinist fit a post on them so they'd fit my Alpha. The metal in these is softer than most I've used. Within 50-75 rackets, the clamps wouldn't hold synthetic gut. They did pretty well with poly, so they became my "poly" clamps. The machine itself looks solid.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
I’ve got those same Eagnas clamps. I keep them dust free but don’t clean them with anything. Admittedly I only string maybe 30-40 racquets per year and 75% of that is Prince or Wilson synthetic gut. I’ve never had a problem and have used them for 5 years.

I’m always amazed at the lengths people go to to say things are worn out and no longer work, slip, etc. The most notorious examples are older Neos or Ektelon string clamps. I’ve seen some crazy things such as adding lead tape to keep them from sliding on the glide bars. If they get any sort of nylon string or even coated gut string buildup, soak them in alcohol and brush them with a toothbrush. They’ll perform like new again. It’s highly unlikely that a non-moving piece of nylon is going to wear down a piece of metal. Now if the nylon were sawing back and forth for days on end, I could see that as a possibility. Otherwise, it’s just residue and it will come clean.
 

norcal

Legend
Thanks for the input guys, I'm picking up the machine later this morning. Good thing I acted quick as two other guys in the group wanted it as well (both new to stringing).

Going to bring my stringmeter and get a reading off his rackets to see ref tension/actual tension difference between the Eagnas and my dropweight (my rackets come off the stringer 5.5 lbs less than ref tension and lose 13-14% over their life, typically). Then I can at least spitball an estimate tension to string my racket at and not have it too tight/loose.
 

struggle

Legend
Looks like a Combo 910. I had one, it worked fine. $250 is s decent price, for sure.

I have the manual if you need it (PDF).
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
The ref tension thing between DW vs LO is overrated. It exists, but both will just be numbers. Just find that new number, which is what you seem to be doing. I would not try to replicate the tension of your old DW, since you will also be moving from floating clamps to fixed clamps. Just be consistent cranking, eg just go click rather than 1-2-3 click. Clamp quickly. Straighten the cross before cranking since you do not want to do it after LO. FWIW, the variance reported between DW vs LO is between 2-7# depending on frame and string. I have personally been in the 3-5# range BITD when using a LO.
 

Steve Huff

G.O.A.T.
The machine has the newer "C" shaped mounting braces too, instead of the old "L" shaped ones. Looks like a nice, solid machine.
 

norcal

Legend
Thanks again for all your input. I just finished stringing my first racket. It went pretty well, definitely a learning curve, a lot of the things are counter intuitive coming from a dropweight with flying clamps.
I ended up setting tension a few pounds less than I did with my drop weight and it came off the stringer 7 pounds less! I’m sure some of that is bad technique, slow clamping etc. but I think a lot of it has to do with dropweight being constant pull. I was very careful to adjust the clamps so there is no slippage.
That’s fine I can use that racket for cold days and I will string another racket tomorrow 7 pounds higher and hopefully get a similar result from the old drop weight. Overall it is much more enjoyable experience and once I get used to it it will be a breeze. Took me about 50 minutes compared to 35 on the klipper. I’m sure I will get a lot faster once I get used to it. Came with a gamma calibrator as well, will be interesting to see what that says when I test it.
 

Wes

Hall of Fame
Thanks again for all your input. I just finished stringing my first racket. It went pretty well, definitely a learning curve, a lot of the things are counter intuitive coming from a dropweight with flying clamps.
I ended up setting tension a few pounds less than I did with my drop weight and it came off the stringer 7 pounds less! I’m sure some of that is bad technique, slow clamping etc. but I think a lot of it has to do with dropweight being constant pull. I was very careful to adjust the clamps so there is no slippage.
That’s fine I can use that racket for cold days and I will string another racket tomorrow 7 pounds higher and hopefully get a similar result from the old drop weight. Overall it is much more enjoyable experience and once I get used to it it will be a breeze. Took me about 50 minutes compared to 35 on the klipper. I’m sure I will get a lot faster once I get used to it. Came with a gamma calibrator as well, will be interesting to see what that says when I test it.
:unsure:
Why in the world would you set the reference tension, on a crank/lock-out machine, lower than what you had used on the drop-weight/constant-pull?
That makes no sense.
When moving from a constant-pull, to a lock-out, you would typically need to set the LO machine to a higher reference tension.

If one was moving from a lock-out, to some type of constant-pull, then a reduction would've likely be in order.
 

norcal

Legend
Yeah I realize that was a mistake - going by what he thought he had strung his rackets at (it had been awhile) and comparing stringmeter readings I thought it would be close. Went a bit lower because I definitely don't want higher than I have now (highest in hot summer) and if I were wrong (as I clearly was) I can use the lower tension in fall/winter.
Also I think the common narrative about how crappy dropweights are (more ways to lose tension) overrode the common sense that a constant pull would produce a tighter stringbed.

^^ long winded way to say I'm dumb! :whistle:
 

brownbearfalling

Hall of Fame
I can’t believe you used a klippermate for that long. I learned on one but instantly switched.

Great purchase. At that price the machine is worth it. I used a machine that had those Babolat star 5 copy clamps and they worked well for me. I would advise to give a thorough cleaning/ lubing and calibrate the tensioner.

When I had an eagnas the biggest issue I faced was the turntable would wobble. So when tension was pulled the racquet would wobble toward the tensioner. There was no way to secure it down. Just poor craftsmanship and design. All in all the machine still worked and did it’s job.
 

struggle

Legend
$250 was a good deal for this machine. Enjoy, I had the same machine for awhile back (Eagnas branded), it was perfectly functional.

If you need parts, beware....Victor at Eagnas is not easy to deal with. And never mention that you bought the machine second hand (used).
Otherwise, you should be ok. Deal with the female there and you are better off.
 

norcal

Legend
Strung one of my newer rackets last night, bumped up the tension to match the Klip. It's nice to be having 'fun' again while stringing.

This weekend I will clean and lube it and calibrate the tension. Everything works well but the glide bars are a bit sticky - will a bit of silicone lubricant do the trick or should I use a different type?

I can’t believe you used a klippermate for that long. I learned on one but instantly switched.
Ha I was a broke college student when I bought it ($119? $129?) and I strung a ton for friends etc. Then I just strung for myself and a couple friends so I never really thought about upgrading. I figure I must have strung close to 1500 frames on that thing! Took it everywhere, even strung on the beach!

I have the manual if you need it (PDF).
@struggle - the seller didn't have the manual, could you send it to me? (pm'd you).
 

struggle

Legend
Strung one of my newer rackets last night, bumped up the tension to match the Klip. It's nice to be having 'fun' again while stringing.

This weekend I will clean and lube it and calibrate the tension. Everything works well but the glide bars are a bit sticky - will a bit of silicone lubricant do the trick or should I use a different type?



Ha I was a broke college student when I bought it ($119? $129?) and I strung a ton for friends etc. Then I just strung for myself and a couple friends so I never really thought about upgrading. I figure I must have strung close to 1500 frames on that thing! Took it everywhere, even strung on the beach!



@struggle - the seller didn't have the manual, could you send it to me? (pm'd you).
Try and clean the base clamp rails with alcohol (90%). Not sure lubing a gripping surface is a good idea.... The bases may need to be adjusted as well. The manual will describe this.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
This weekend I will clean and lube it and calibrate the tension. Everything works well but the glide bars are a bit sticky - will a bit of silicone lubricant do the trick or should I use a different type?
I think this was a great purchase for $250. Don't lube the base bars, otherwise they'll probably slip, not to mention attract smutz. Instead clean them with some isopropyl alcohol.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
:unsure:
Why in the world would you set the reference tension, on a crank/lock-out machine, lower than what you had used on the drop-weight/constant-pull?
That makes no sense.
When moving from a constant-pull, to a lock-out, you would typically need to set the LO machine to a higher reference tension.

If one was moving from a lock-out, to some type of constant-pull, then a reduction would've likely be in order.
I had to do that very thing when I moved from a drop weight to the Neos. Reason was to compensate for the clamps. The drop weight flying clamps (Gamma composite) has a lot of drawback where they fixed clamps on the Neos did not. If I remember correctly, and I have posted this, I had to move tension down about 8 pounds.
 
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