3 Tips For Developing a Better Slice Backhand!!

thomas daniels

Semi-Pro
First off.

For the record.

This post is for intermediate and advance players only.

So, if you don't fit into those groups, you can stop reading now.

Also, here are some reasons that you should develop a slice backhand...

You will be able develop a better approach shot and you will be able to disrupt your opponent's timing on points in your tennis matches.

Now, check out the tips.

1).

Start with the right grip.


You must use a continental grip on your slice backhand.

I see players trying to hit slice shots with semi-eastern grips all the time.

And it affects their feel for making the shot in their matches.

If the continental grip feel strange at first, just get in more reps until you get use to using it.

2).

The backswing must be high and compact
.

Keep your non racket hand on the throat until the last minute too.

The higher the better, because what you are attemting to do here, is bite through the ball on a downward angle with your racket.

So, to do that, use a higher backswing and slice through it and accelerate your racket head speed at the same time.

This takes practice and patience, but the more reps you get in and the more adjustments you do after each one, will help you develop a better slice in months.

NOTE- experiment with side spin as well.(Look at the palm of your hand as being an extension of your racket face)

Because they are great on those approach shots for taking your oppoent wide, then hitting behind them.

3).

You must slice all the way through the ball.

This is the biggest mistake that I see players making when hitting a slice backhand.

They don't slice all the way through the ball and it throws their timing off for making the shot.

Watch the pros more when they are using the slice on points and you will see that...

It's always one flowing and fluid motions, with them biting through the ball at a sidways or downward angle (Ex. Federer).

Try to tape yourself if you can, to get a better visual FEEL of what you are doing, then use that feedback to make corrections...

NOTE.

Use very small chopping steps, when preparing to help a slice backhand.

Because.

The way your body is align with the ball before contact, will have a big impact on whether you will be able to execute the shot or not.

With that being said.

Let me leave you guys with this to think about.

The slice backhand is the most under used shot in adult and junior play right now, so by developing a better slice backhand in months.

You will have another competitive edge over your opponents in your future matches.
 
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ballmachineguy

Hall of Fame
Don’t forget that the non dominant arm must perform a similar motion on the other side of the body or you will not slice as smoothly. It keeps you perfectly balanced. Kind of like a baseball ump making an energetic safe sign with two hands vs only one. Also, it will keep you from spinning out/rotating.
 
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stapletonj

Hall of Fame
somewhat disagree on the high part. I try to vary my takeback so that my racket is level with the ball at the start of my swing.
it makes my slice backhand more flattish, but it also prevents it from "sitting up" if I get slightly too open with my racket face.

everything else is spot on
 

ballmachineguy

Hall of Fame
somewhat disagree on the high part. I try to vary my takeback so that my racket is level with the ball at the start of my swing.
If you are actually doing the above, you aren’t actually hitting a slice. You can’t slice bread without getting the knife above the loaf. If at same level, you are next to the bread or the knife was already in the loaf. No slicing to be done.
With few exceptions, most have the racquet pretty level and behind the head (even for knee high shot). The great thing about that distance to contact is that you use very little effort in getting the racquet started and accelerate into contact area. This makes for smooth stroke. If the ball is at the height of the racquet to start with, you would have to let the ball get to the strings and jerk mightily for any under spin.
 

thomas daniels

Semi-Pro
somewhat disagree on the high part. I try to vary my takeback so that my racket is level with the ball at the start of my swing.
it makes my slice backhand more flattish, but it also prevents it from "sitting up" if I get slightly too open with my racket face.

everything else is spot on
But you can't generate the bite that you want to have by doing it that way...
 
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stapletonj

Hall of Fame
You guys are correct insofar as the notion that a high takeback and strong downward motion WILL impart more backspin.

My point was that, for most of us, the risk of missing just slightly and pushing over a floater that does have a lot of bite, but slows down dramatically and sits up short at about waist level is pretty high. ugh.

Also for doubles, the high takeback slice tends to cross the net higher than the "flattish" slice.
And we all know what the net player does to those shots...... again, ugh....

So, in summation, I guess my takeaway is as follows

1. 4.0 and down, singles and doubles, hit the "flattish" slice
2. over 4.0? Go for it with the higher takeback.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
You guys are correct insofar as the notion that a high takeback and strong downward motion WILL impart more backspin.

My point was that, for most of us, the risk of missing just slightly and pushing over a floater that does have a lot of bite, but slows down dramatically and sits up short at about waist level is pretty high. ugh.

Also for doubles, the high takeback slice tends to cross the net higher than the "flattish" slice.
And we all know what the net player does to those shots...... again, ugh....

So, in summation, I guess my takeaway is as follows

1. 4.0 and down, singles and doubles, hit the "flattish" slice
2. over 4.0? Go for it with the higher takeback.

Slice bh was an important shot for me in singles tournaments. For me ... flatter with accuracy moving opponents around with "enough" backspin was more important to me than extreme backspin bite. You could find old posts of mine here saying something similar what you said ... I figured a higher backswing (racquet behind head) would have decreased my accuracy (I never had a high floater issue ... I just want to hit slice to tight targets). One day @IowaGuy here got me to try it. I was very surprised ... didn't hurt accuracy at all with the upside of easy increase in pace with bigger bite as an option when I opted for it. So at least for me ... my decades old 1hbh slice got better and just as accurate with higher and more full (shoulders) backswing. But ... that was me ... I agree the most important thing for all of us is "repeatable ... do no harm". One's mileage may vary.

Starting with a good turn and racquet up behind head does not dictate swing plane. You can drop it to flatter swing or cut steep high to low. That's the beauty of a 1hbh slice ... utility club.

Rosewall I think drove a more flattish less bite 1hbh slice from a pretty high backswing ... at least measured by rh behind head (I got to where I preferred elbow up there also with raquet parallel to the ground ... seemed to make slice effortless):

 

thomas daniels

Semi-Pro
If you are actually doing the above, you aren’t actually hitting a slice. You can’t slice bread without getting the knife above the loaf. If at same level, you are next to the bread or the knife was already in the loaf. No slicing to be done.
With few exceptions, most have the racquet pretty level and behind the head (even for knee high shot). The great thing about that distance to contact is that you use very little effort in getting the racquet started and accelerate into contact area. This makes for smooth stroke. If the ball is at the height of the racquet to start with, you would have to let the ball get to the strings and jerk mightily for any under spin.
Federer's take back is real high...
 

thomas daniels

Semi-Pro
Slice bh was an important shot for me in singles tournaments. For me ... flatter with accuracy moving opponents around with "enough" backspin was more important to me than extreme backspin bite. You could find old posts of mine here saying something similar what you said ... I figured a higher backswing (racquet behind head) would have decreased my accuracy (I never had a high floater issue ... I just want to hit slice to tight targets). One day @IowaGuy here got me to try it. I was very surprised ... didn't hurt accuracy at all with the upside of easy increase in pace with bigger bite as an option when I opted for it. So at least for me ... my decades old 1hbh slice got better and just as accurate with higher and more full (shoulders) backswing. But ... that was me ... I agree the most important thing for all of us is "repeatable ... do no harm". One's mileage may vary.

Starting with a good turn and racquet up behind head does not dictate swing plane. You can drop it to flatter swing or cut steep high to low. That's the beauty of a 1hbh slice ... utility club.

Rosewall I think drove a more flattish less bite 1hbh slice from a pretty high backswing ... at least measured by rh behind head (I got to where I preferred elbow up there also with raquet parallel to the ground ... seemed to make slice effortless):

check this out-
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
check this out-

Yeah … I have watched a lot of Fed videos … all strokes. I agree that a quality 1hbh slice is a great asset for a rec player, coupled with disguised drop shot. I probably wouldn’t use the term “compact backswing” because you are trying to encourage full shoulder turn just like all BHs … but I think you basically nailed it in OP. (y)
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
Aaaannnd that's why he gets paid to play and we don't......
I agree that the PROS do that high takeback a lot.
I love the video of Rosewall.

Yes he starts by taking it back high and early with his wooden small racket. He then whips it through a loop to where when it comes forward it is coming forward more flatly (path is a line close to the path of the ball, not close to perpendicular to the path of the ball).
I would submit the high takeback and whipping through a loop and down to a flatter swing is to build up momentum (f=ma) to allow the ball to be struck smartly. If he were to take the racket in more of a straight back - straight forward swing, it would be more difficult to generate the force needed to hit the ball smartly.

Unfortunately, we are not pros. What is the number one by far cause of unforced errors on groundstrokes (and approach shots, returns and volleys and overheads, now that I think about it). BEING LATE WITH YOUR FOOTWORK, PREPARATION, AND SWING.

What has been the number one change in tennis since the days of Rosewall, especially in rec.? Bigger frames, stiffer frames made with exotic materials. All doing what? MORE POWER. (Wilson Profile) Consequently, we can get away with smaller more compact backswing which gives us a little more time to get the racket moving forward quickly enough to make contact in front of us, as is needed. The high takeback resulting in a loop swing only flattening out just before contact with the ball is really cool and helpful, but you really need to analyze yourself.

Am I quick enough and well trained enough and fast enough that I am almost never late to the ball and/or in my swing? (If you say yes, then you are probably over 4.0, like I said above). Then the high takeback and loop into a flattish swing should be a part of your arsenal.

IF not, then I suggest that working on your speed and prep before the swing is important, but that allowing yourself the extra few nanoseconds to get your racket head out in front is more important and the more simplified takeback is better for your game
 

thomas daniels

Semi-Pro
Aaaannnd that's why he gets paid to play and we don't......
I agree that the PROS do that high takeback a lot.
I love the video of Rosewall.

Yes he starts by taking it back high and early with his wooden small racket. He then whips it through a loop to where when it comes forward it is coming forward more flatly (path is a line close to the path of the ball, not close to perpendicular to the path of the ball).
I would submit the high takeback and whipping through a loop and down to a flatter swing is to build up momentum (f=ma) to allow the ball to be struck smartly. If he were to take the racket in more of a straight back - straight forward swing, it would be more difficult to generate the force needed to hit the ball smartly.

Unfortunately, we are not pros. What is the number one by far cause of unforced errors on groundstrokes (and approach shots, returns and volleys and overheads, now that I think about it). BEING LATE WITH YOUR FOOTWORK, PREPARATION, AND SWING.

What has been the number one change in tennis since the days of Rosewall, especially in rec.? Bigger frames, stiffer frames made with exotic materials. All doing what? MORE POWER. (Wilson Profile) Consequently, we can get away with smaller more compact backswing which gives us a little more time to get the racket moving forward quickly enough to make contact in front of us, as is needed. The high takeback resulting in a loop swing only flattening out just before contact with the ball is really cool and helpful, but you really need to analyze yourself.

Am I quick enough and well trained enough and fast enough that I am almost never late to the ball and/or in my swing? (If you say yes, then you are probably over 4.0, like I said above). Then the high takeback and loop into a flattish swing should be a part of your arsenal.

IF not, then I suggest that working on your speed and prep before the swing is important, but that allowing yourself the extra few nanoseconds to get your racket head out in front is more important and the more simplified takeback is better for your game
You don't have to be a pro to imprint this shot on your subconsious mind, just watch videos of it daily(followed by shadow swings), do the reps and make the adjustments as you are doing them... it's called modern NLP or speed learning...
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
Thomas, respectfully, I agree with what you say, but no matter how much you "imprint" this shot into your subconscious mind, the extra motion required means that you must start the shot earlier to present the racket face to the ball "in front", which is critical to the backhand in general. The longer and more the prep. the greater chance to be just a little late, with disastrous results for the shot.

Know why the 2 hand BH is such a Godsend to beginners? Because they can be a little late and still hit a decent shot.
Being late in getting the racket to the ball is the number one reason for missed shots.
 

ballmachineguy

Hall of Fame
Thomas, respectfully, I agree with what you say, but no matter how much you "imprint" this shot into your subconscious mind, the extra motion required means that you must start the shot earlier to present the racket face to the ball "in front", which is critical to the backhand in general. The longer and more the prep. the greater chance to be just a little late, with disastrous results for the shot.

Know why the 2 hand BH is such a Godsend to beginners? Because they can be a little late and still hit a decent shot.
Being late in getting the racket to the ball is the number one reason for missed shots.
Well, since a slice that is more about returning at the pace of the incoming ball speed, because you are mostly creating backspin, has a swing path that is just short of perpendicular to the flight of incoming ball, yeah, late would pretty much mean a whiff. Yet, you rarely see it.
The great thing a bout a slice is that it is all gravity assisted toward the contact. Ball skips faster off a line, just pull dow more quickly. Try that on a low to high swing path shot! Also, the backswing and forward swing are not the same part of a loop like on topspin shot. You can set up, put the racquet behind the head and just wait a second or two, if you want. No negative effect. Not a shot you should be late hitting.
 
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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Thomas, respectfully, I agree with what you say, but no matter how much you "imprint" this shot into your subconscious mind, the extra motion required means that you must start the shot earlier to present the racket face to the ball "in front", which is critical to the backhand in general. The longer and more the prep. the greater chance to be just a little late, with disastrous results for the shot.

Know why the 2 hand BH is such a Godsend to beginners? Because they can be a little late and still hit a decent shot.
Being late in getting the racket to the ball is the number one reason for missed shots.

First ... on us rec players being late (let's just say baseline rally) I think that is all about not being unit turned in time (say by bounce on your side) rather than length of stroke. That's just bad habits between our ears. 8-B

But repeatable isn't as straightforward imo. Again ... throw out ros for my point. My go to 1hbh ros against a big serve was block/slice ... abbreviated shoulder turn and arm backswing if necessary (you gotta do what you gotta do to get ros back in play). But on everything else other than big serves ... my experience on all things 1hbh ... a full unit turn in a closed stance with shoulder under chin is more repeatable than a shorter unit turn and swing. This is what I mean. Say you get a typical rec rally ball where you are going to have to generate much of your pace. Just pick a pace ... say we are trying to hit 30-45 mph low slice deep to opponents corner. With a full shoulder turn (regardless of swing plane) ... much more effortless than trying to hit same pace/shot/trajectory with a 1/4 or 1/2 unit turn. Hard to make the case "more arming" effort is more repeatable than the same swing plane with less effort.

But swing plane difference ... more high to low for more backspin ... absolutely a higher degree of timing difficulty. So to me ... a common sense approach or at least starting point for a rec player 1hbh slice is be strict about 1) full unit turn in closed stance by bounce 2) moderate high to low with enough open rf for backspin. Arm, racquet, rf position imo is not nearly as key as that shoulder under the chin.

I think it's a utility shot that doesn't require strict technical adherence like a full topspin fh stroke for example. Djokovic 's is ugly as crap imo ... but it serves it purpose. A rec player that can hit his spots with a low UE low trajectory 1hbh slice is often a great addition in singles ... and also a very effective doubles ros even at 4.5.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
ByeByePoly, I think we are at least 90% in agreement.... perhaps just using different verbiage.

I agree… and probably 100% with my old post. 8-B If I find it … I will link it. I only responded because I love the 1hbh slice and had great success over decades with it. There really wasn’t anything that needed fixing … but this old dog was totally surprised what happened in the first 5 minutes when I put the rh behind my head. Best part was friends that I have played for 20+ years said … “that’s different”.8-B
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I was watching the Djokovic vs Brooksby match and it made me think of this thread. Watch Djokovic hit his 1hbh slice rally ball … no excessive pace or backspin … and yet it worked at elite level just keeping it deep with a lowish trajectory.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
what i realised with federers video are two things that i hadnt noticed, the high backswing i knew, but when i tried to do that i often framed the ball, what i saw now is that his stance isnt as closed as i thought it had to be to hit a good slice, and that his wrist is quite locked at contact, i sometimes tried to use the wrist in the slice because i felt i generated more backspin (backspin i would get with a higher backswing) ill try to practice the locke wrist and straight arm at contact, im a one hander and i really want to have a consistent and disturbing slice, it would get my game much further
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
what i realised with federers video are two things that i hadnt noticed, the high backswing i knew, but when i tried to do that i often framed the ball, what i saw now is that his stance isnt as closed as i thought it had to be to hit a good slice, and that his wrist is quite locked at contact, i sometimes tried to use the wrist in the slice because i felt i generated more backspin (backspin i would get with a higher backswing) ill try to practice the locke wrist and straight arm at contact, im a one hander and i really want to have a consistent and disturbing slice, it would get my game much further

Low and accurate with “some” backspin is quite disturbing in rec singles. The amount of topspin … particularly if heavy often got our attention in tournaments, but I can’t remember one conversation where we ever said something like “wow … that guys backspin was insane”. We had a lot of successful 1hbh chip and charge players … and I can’t remember any of them going for any more backspin than just enough to keep bounce fairly low. Accuracy and placement way more important to them … more spin at cost of placement wasn’t worth it. If you can pull off both … go for it … otherwise stick with low and accurate.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
Low and accurate with “some” backspin is quite disturbing in rec singles. The amount of topspin … particularly if heavy often got our attention in tournaments, but I can’t remember one conversation where we ever said something like “wow … that guys backspin was insane”. We had a lot of successful 1hbh chip and charge players … and I can’t remember any of them going for any more backspin than just enough to keep bounce fairly low. Accuracy and placement way more important to them … more spin at cost of placement wasn’t worth it. If you can pull off both … go for it … otherwise stick with low and accurate.
i agree, hitting spots with a low slice gives you much more than a ton of backspin, wich eventually is gonna make some of them slices float, i just dont trust my slice technique enough to go for spots so at the moment what i can do more or less succesfully is aiming for backspin and try to make it crosscourt and not too centered, the aproach down the line im much more gentle in the swing tough, i just havent put a lot of reps into it, at trainning we barely do slices and i have to practice in matches, wich you can imagine the outcome
 
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QuadCam

Professional
By High and compact, I'm assuming you mean a big high takeback....and a compact follow through.

That's how it was explained to me years ago. Kind of the opposite of a topspin forehand which has a high compact takeback and a big follow through.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
i agree, hitting spots with a low slice gives you much more than a ton of backspin, wich eventually is gonna make some of them slices float, i just dont trust my slice technique enough to go for spots so at the moment what i can do more or less succesfully is aiming for backspin and try to make it crosscourt and not too centered, the aproach down the line im much more gentle in the swing tough, i just havent put a lot of reps into it, at trainning we barely do slices and i have to practice in matches, wich you can imagine the outcome

Ah ... got it. But even at the start of the learning curve ... I (not a coach) would not have you start with "big" backspin. I would just concentrate on basic technique ... moderate backspin ... decrease target size as you progress. I see the "floaty" comment all the time, and that always leaves me a little puzzled. In fairness ... long, long time ago when I was going through the slice bh learning curve. But to my mind ... a slice is "floaty" by definition. Topspin trying to curve down, backspin trying to curve up but loses to gravity. If one is referring to "floaty" as far as depth, that just seems like any groundstroke ... swing speed, racquet face, trajectory. If the slice technique is basically close enough ... and a slice is going to high and long ... adjust swing path, rf, trajectory ... yada yada yada. But good for you adding the bh slice to your game early ... it's a utility shot that is a big addition to your options/game. Enjoy the ride. A good rec utility bh slice is A LOT about feel and touch ... I think even more than technique.

Btw ... neutral or closed fine ... imo the main early swing thought should be good shoulder turn even on slower pace/touch shots. Even a touch shot like a drop shot gets huge benefit from the shoulder uncoiling assist.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
Ah ... got it. But even at the start of the learning curve ... I (not a coach) would not have you start with "big" backspin. I would just concentrate on basic technique ... moderate backspin ... decrease target size as you progress. I see the "floaty" comment all the time, and that always leaves me a little puzzled. In fairness ... long, long time ago when I was going through the slice bh learning curve. But to my mind ... a slice is "floaty" by definition. Topspin trying to curve down, backspin trying to curve up but loses to gravity. If one is referring to "floaty" as far as depth, that just seems like any groundstroke ... swing speed, racquet face, trajectory. If the slice technique is basically close enough ... and a slice is going to high and long ... adjust swing path, rf, trajectory ... yada yada yada. But good for you adding the bh slice to your game early ... it's a utility shot that is a big addition to your options/game. Enjoy the ride. A good rec utility bh slice is A LOT about feel and touch ... I think even more than technique.
Yeah when it floats i mean that you catch the ball a little earlier and the raquet face is a tad more open than the previous slice, and instead of skidding trough the court, it sits up, but yeah i must admit that the rec players i play that have good slices dont seem to have very complex technique, they rely on feel and soft hands, i have a good top spin one hander and i like to be quite agressive with it, maybe thats why im not so natural at slicing, also, the reason why i ended up looking for backspin, is because too many slices ended at the net when i tried to keep it low and with little backspin, whereas with a more agressive cut at the ball, they always clear the net, but at the cost of accuracy and consistency, i hope i ll get to an intermediate point, because the feeling of a good slice is so good, it ads a lot of variety and is so easy on the body, its like you are resting in the middle of the rally, and at the same time making things difficult for your opponent, its just a smart shot
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Yeah when it floats i mean that you catch the ball a little earlier and the raquet face is a tad more open than the previous slice, and instead of skidding trough the court, it sits up, but yeah i must admit that the rec players i play that have good slices dont seem to have very complex technique, they rely on feel and soft hands, i have a good top spin one hander and i like to be quite agressive with it, maybe thats why im not so natural at slicing, also, the reason why i ended up looking for backspin, is because too many slices ended at the net when i tried to keep it low and with little backspin, whereas with a more agressive cut at the ball, they always clear the net, but at the cost of accuracy and consistency, i hope i ll get to an intermediate point, because the feeling of a good slice is so good, it ads a lot of variety and is so easy on the body, its like you are resting in the middle of the rally, and at the same time making things difficult for your opponent, its just a smart shot

Yep ... particularly in the land of high heat and humidity summer singles. Also ... your existing bh drive will make that slice even more of a weapon. A bh slice rally with a finishing bh drive passing shot is a completely different animal than a player with only slice. What is your bh drive grip? I hit flattish bh drives and hit every bh with continental, so never had a bh grip change issue. BH slice ... and drop shots need to be continental imo.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
Yep ... particularly in the land of high heat and humidity summer singles. Also ... your existing bh drive will make that slice even more of a weapon. A bh slice rally with a finishing bh drive passing shot is a completely different animal than a player with only slice. What is your bh drive grip? I hit flattish bh drives and hit every bh with continental, so never had a bh grip change issue. BH slice ... and drop shots need to be continental imo.
I have eastern backhand grip and semiwestern forehand, it used to be eastern but i found i could be much more agressive with semi, and it paid off, continental for everything else, including drop shots, i never had too much of a problem switching grips, maybe at first i was a little more clumsy, but now its easy, as for the backhand, i learned to hit it with a lot of spin and i can deffend quite good with it and also hit it flatter when on the attack, not on the level of accuracy of the forehand but im quite happy with it because at first everybody atacked my backhand with great success, the thing is, when i dont slice too much i win more matches , but thats just because my slice is a plain bad shot compared to my top spin backhand, i just feel like if i developed it i would reach another level, also what i like about the slice is that is soo good for setting up your forehand
And yeah i live in very very humit place, and play singles mostly, im 30 years old but whe i play matches close to 3 hours i can barely move for two days
 
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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I have eastern backhand grip and semiwestern forehand, it used to be eastern but i found i could be much more agressive with semi, and it paid off, continental for everything else, including drop shots, i never had too much of a problem switching grips, maybe at first i was a little more clumsy, but now its easy, as for the backhand, i learned to hit it with a lot of spin and i can deffend quite good with it and also hit it flatter when on the attack, not on the level of accuracy of the forehand but im quite happy with it because at first everybody atacked my backhand with great success, the thing is, when i dont slice too much i win more matches , but thats just because my slice is a plain bad shot compared to my top spin backhand, i just feel like if i developed it i would reach another level, also what i like about the slice is that is soo good for setting up your forehand
And yeah i live in very very humit place, and play singles mostly, im 30 years old but whe i play matches close to 3 hours i can barely move for two days

I was the opposite ... more bh slice more wins. I used bh flattish drives dtl for my go to passing shot, and to inject offense in a rally.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
I was the opposite ... more bh slice more wins. I used bh flattish drives dtl for my go to passing shot, and to inject offense in a rally.
Its tricky to play against that, with my style i rely a lot on intensity, the day im a step slower everything changes so drastically, thats why i would like to get some of that relaxed crafty style to change things up while i find my feet and my strokes during a match, but i guess you cant have everything, altough just a little bit of each world would do
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
[/hijack] You should employ your BH slice against Dennis, the Squirrel. [/end hijack]

hahahaha ... hello sir esgee ... hope all is well. You realize these guys have no idea what you just referenced. You should respond in the squirrel thread ... hahahaha. Good point though ... who would take advice from someone in his golden squirrel years. 8-B
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Its tricky to play against that, with my style i rely a lot on intensity, the day im a step slower everything changes so drastically, thats why i would like to get some of that relaxed crafty style to change things up while i find my feet and my strokes during a match, but i guess you cant have everything, altough just a little bit of each world would do

Truth here ... once I switched to kick serve, s&v, c&c ... the amount I varied from one tournament match to another was pretty small. If I was tight ... that didn't really break down ... it was the full fh and bh drives that were more susceptible to early match tension. That said ... you always want want you don't have. Most of us s&v players would have loved a heavy topspin cc 1hbh ... particularly sharp angle cc. But ... like you implied ... having to be "on" doesn't usually work out in a tournament where you might have to play 5-6 rounds. One of those matches you are likely to be a little off with the full drives.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
Truth here ... once I switched to kick serve, s&v, c&c ... the amount I varied from one tournament match to another was pretty small. If I was tight ... that didn't really break down ... it was the full fh and bh drives that were more susceptible to early match tension. That said ... you always want want you don't have. Most of us s&v players would have loved a heavy topspin cc 1hbh ... particularly sharp angle cc. But ... like you implied ... having to be "on" doesn't usually work out in a tournament where you might have to play 5-6 rounds. One of those matches you are likely to be a little off with the full drives.
its so true that we want what we dont have, personally the tennis i would like to play, and that i like the most is serve and volley, but my body and constitution, as well as the way i move, push me in other directions, im just agressive with the movements and atacking the ball and getting inside the court just feels right for me, i could learn a bit more about s&v and try it, but my game is just not that, my serve is not a weapon, i tried to play a little more like that but lost too many matches and in horrible fashion, i like to charge the net and keep points not too long tough, also, what i do to warm up full swings at the beggining of a match, is just focusing more on spin and keep it deep, so you dont get attacked easily, and begin to take full cuts at the easy balls first, then as confidence builds up and you adapt to conditions, you can swing more freely, but yeah is also the beauty of the sport how your body and qualities drive you towards one style of play, even if you didnt really choose it, for me, if i start going to the net at the beggining of a match, ill miss half the volleys, im not tall and i have to stretch a lot, so my body really needs to be warm to be sharp at the net, also i dont really know how to make drop volleys so they are all drive volleys
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
its so true that we want what we dont have, personally the tennis i would like to play, and that i like the most is serve and volley, but my body and constitution, as well as the way i move, push me in other directions, im just agressive with the movements and atacking the ball and getting inside the court just feels right for me, i could learn a bit more about s&v and try it, but my game is just not that, my serve is not a weapon, i tried to play a little more like that but lost too many matches and in horrible fashion, i like to charge the net and keep points not too long tough, also, what i do to warm up full swings at the beggining of a match, is just focusing more on spin and keep it deep, so you dont get attacked easily, and begin to take full cuts at the easy balls first, then as confidence builds up and you adapt to conditions, you can swing more freely, but yeah is also the beauty of the sport how your body and qualities drive you towards one style of play, even if you didnt really choose it, for me, if i start going to the net at the beggining of a match, ill miss half the volleys, im not tall and i have to stretch a lot, so my body really needs to be warm to be sharp at the net, also i dont really know how to make drop volleys so they are all drive volleys

S&V for me was by choice ... my instinct was fast agile 5' 7" defensive baseliner. Long matches ... very hard to inject offense for me. S&V ended up being instant offense ... completely changed my results. Most have ... or will develop "good enough" rec singles volley for s&v. It's the overhead and speed/agility that often is the main obstacle. Serve just has to be good enough for constant attack. I lived off of moderate pace low double fault kicker, and good duece slice wide. One friend ... fellow s&v top in state with 100% slice serve ... whatever gives you a consistent close to net for 1st volley.

I think a great option for aggressive baseliners is just what you said ... pick your moments from the baseline and close and finish. It drives me crazy when I have watched local college girls with awesome baseline game never go in a finish the point from the sitter they just created.
 
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Slicehand

Guest
S&V for me was by choice ... my instinct was fast agile 5' 7" defensive baseliner. Long matches ... very hard to inject offense for me. S&V ended up being instant offense ... completely changed my results. Most have ... or will develop "good enough" rec singles volley for s&v. It's the overhead and speed/agility that often is the main obstacle. Serve just has to be good enough for constant attack. I lived off of moderate pace low double fault kicker, and good duece slice wide. One friend ... fellow s&v top in state with 100% slice serve ... whatever gives you a consistent close to net for 1st volley.

I think a great option for aggressive baseliners is just what you said ... pick your moments from the baseline and close and finish. It drives me crazy when I have watched local college girls with awesome baseline game never go in a finish the point from the sitter they just created.
Wow thats nice to hear, ill try to keep evolving, and yes i dont like that tennis with no willing to finish the point, you create a chance but you keep waiting for your opponent to make a mistake, i dont think that pays off in the long run, better to be brave and when you lose, try to lose on your own terms
 
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