4.0 + Racquets.

GAZ082

Rookie
Hi. I'm just browsing through the vast amount of rackets in TW looking for a heavy one (12 oz) and found that most of them are recommended for 4.0+ players, independent of the head size. So i wonder, these "player" rackets are by conception for 4.0+ players? If so, why?

  • The weight? What if i'm a muscled guy?
  • The fact that they are light balanced and therefore offer less power? What if i have a good legs-shoulders transition that gives me nice head speed?
  • Small sweetspot? But today's rackets aren't supposed to have fairly large sweetspots (there are exceptions)? (for a 95-100" head)
Just do not get it.

I'm a 2.5 player with a LM4.
 
Hi. I'm just browsing through the vast amount of rackets in TW looking for a heavy one (12 oz) and found that most of them are recommended for 4.0+ players, independent of the head size. So i wonder, these "player" rackets are by conception for 4.0+ players? If so, why?

  • The weight? What if i'm a muscled guy?
  • The fact that they are light balanced and therefore offer less power? What if i have a good legs-shoulders transition that gives me nice head speed?
  • Small sweetspot? But today's rackets aren't supposed to have fairly large sweetspots (there are exceptions)? (for a 95-100" head)
Just do not get it.

I'm a 2.5 player with a LM4.
There are idiots on the boards that will tell you that you have to be a certain level or have a certain style to get this racquet or that racquet..

The fact is: THERE IS NO RULE

Get whatever you want and feel like playing with..
 
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snoflewis

Hall of Fame
There are idiots on the boards that will tell you that you have to be a certain level or have a certain style to get this racquet or that racquet..

The fact is: THERE IS NO RULE

Get whatever you want and feel like playing with..
yep...agree...although some rackets will help you more than others...
 

soggyramen

Professional
i think the amount of forgivness and how fast and hard you have to swing to get the full benefit of the racquet should be done by ntrp but then again nothing's better than something you feel comfortable with.

but what i'm saying is that you wouldn't suggest a k90 to a 2.0 or a prestige mid to a 3.0
 

takl23

Semi-Pro
i think the amount of forgivness and how fast and hard you have to swing to get the full benefit of the racquet should be done by ntrp but then again nothing's better than something you feel comfortable with.

but what i'm saying is that you wouldn't suggest a k90 to a 2.0 or a prestige mid to a 3.0
Exactly. I'm at the 4.0 level and I wouldn't use a k90, I have hit with it, but I know it won't do me any good. Play with a broomstick if it allows you to play well!:-D :-D

Cheers,

Tim
 
i think the amount of forgivness and how fast and hard you have to swing to get the full benefit of the racquet should be done by ntrp but then again nothing's better than something you feel comfortable with.

but what i'm saying is that you wouldn't suggest a k90 to a 2.0 or a prestige mid to a 3.0
Well probably not. But I didn't have much choice when I had to start with a wood frame. So if they did get themselves a K90, it certainly wouldn't kill them;)

Some people think tennis was invented 5 years ago, and the only racquet the newbies should use are 200" Babolats and W line racquets..
 

soggyramen

Professional
Well probably not. But I didn't have much choice when I had to start with a wood frame. So if they did get themselves a K90, it certainly wouldn't kill them;)

Some people think tennis was invented 5 years ago, and the only racquet the newbies should use are 200" Babolats and W line racquets..
well who's fault is that lol :p j/k
 

quest01

Hall of Fame
yep...agree...although some rackets will help you more than others...
I agree that some rackets will help more than others. I'm a 4.5 player and would only use a 90 sq inch racket if I was playing for fun or playing against a guy thats well under me in skill level. However if I was playing seriously or in a league I would not use a 90 sq inch racket because it is much more demanding then a 95 or 100 sq inch racket.
 

threed

New User
Trust me everything is in the way you swing.

No matter how strong you are, if you are 2.5 you will for sure struggle with 4.0+ racquet.

Head LM4 is indeed good racquet, and will suit you well at least you're 4.0+ player.

So keep your good racquet and do some lessons for the money :) Then you will start to fell what is your style and what racquet will suit you.
 

OrangeOne

Legend
Hi. I'm just browsing through the vast amount of rackets in TW looking for a heavy one (12 oz) and found that most of them are recommended for 4.0+ players, independent of the head size. So i wonder, these "player" rackets are by conception for 4.0+ players? If so, why?
  • The weight? What if i'm a muscled guy?
  • The fact that they are light balanced and therefore offer less power? What if i have a good legs-shoulders transition that gives me nice head speed?
  • Small sweetspot? But today's rackets aren't supposed to have fairly large sweetspots (there are exceptions)? (for a 95-100" head)
Just do not get it.

I'm a 2.5 player with a LM4.
a. I'm slightly confused that a '2.5' player is concerned with "legs shoulders transitions" and "head speed". Most 2.5s, by my understanding, should be focused on hitting the ball into the court, and doing so by using the strings. That may sound harsh, but in reality, I don't get players at the 2.5 level caring too much (at all) about frames. Find something that's comfortable, hit the ball, do it often! Changing frames (unless there's a very inappropriate frame in the mix) at the 2.5 level shouldn't have much impact....

b. Of course modern frames have (comparatively) larger sweetspots, but yes, some have larger than others. The general perception seems to be that the larger the sweetspot, the less control is offered, hence a frame like the k90 having a small sweetspot but excellent control if you can nail that sweetspot over & over.

c. 'Muscled'... or not... will generally not impact your ability to use a heavier frame. Skill level will, as it becomes all about swing-speed as ability gets higher. Look at Fed, look at Gasquet's backhand, etc etc - it's far more about how fast and accurately you can swing a frame than anything else, neither of those guys are overly 'muscled'.
 
I agree that some rackets will help more than others. I'm a 4.5 player and would only use a 90 sq inch racket if I was playing for fun or playing against a guy thats well under me in skill level. However if I was playing seriously or in a league I would not use a 90 sq inch racket because it is much more demanding then a 95 or 100 sq inch racket.
Well I owned and tried 95 and 98 inch frames in this last year as I wanted get something that was a bit more modern. But I ended up going 360 and am back with a mid 89.5 inch LM Prestige.. Anything bigger just looks and feels strange to me.. Although, the new MG radical has interested me..
 

keithchircop

Professional
I'm not going to go into the advantages of heavy racquets.

Heavy racquets (even a Radical LE OS or a POG OS):
+require good technique to generate good pace
+takes a little longer to swing them, so you cannot have late preparation and still manage a great shot i.e. a little more concentration is needed

You need good preparation/fast strokes to hit the ball on time. That said, NTRP ratings aren't based on how good your strokes look. You can have the earliest preparation and the most beautiful strokes in the world and still remain a 3.0 forever, regardless of what racquet you use.

Soon some self proclaimed teaching gurus will come in here and tell you that you're not good enough for heavy racquets and never will be. That you suck.

Just demo a 12oz stick (strung) and see how it goes.
 

SimpleSimon

New User
I agree that some rackets will help more than others. I'm a 4.5 player and would only use a 90 sq inch racket if I was playing for fun or playing against a guy thats well under me in skill level. However if I was playing seriously or in a league I would not use a 90 sq inch racket because it is much more demanding then a 95 or 100 sq inch racket.
My experience exactly.
 
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