4.5 In search for the "Holy Grail"

iamrkoev

New User
Dear tennis fellows,

I'm looking to buy yet another racquet. Truth is - I don't even know what I want anymore.

There are many experts and lots of tennis nerds here, who tested lots of different racquets. Based on your experience - please advise me on what to buy next.

Personally - I have never used a racquet that was produced after 2006. I prefer and play more often on a hard court and I've been using mostly a LM Prestige 98 with some lead at 3 and 9 strung with a full bed of Yonex Tour Pro Poly or a hybrid with Wilson Sensation for the mains. I usually hit flat and I like to play aggressively. I love to go on to the net and do serve & volley. The Prestige is a great racquet, but if I miss the sweet spot my shots land short or even in the net, so this summer I took my Yonex RD-8, because I was playing mostly on clay. I do enjoy this surface a lot - I love to slide, but I hate the long rallies and I can't go that often to the net so basically I "beat myself" due to impatience, forced errors in my attempts to win the point aggressively and due to my flat strokes as well. The Yonex's pattern helped me to decrease the long shots (I use a slightly modified eastern grip - similar to Fed and Dimitrov's) and I also enjoyed the extra spin on my serve! Strung with a full bed of Yonex Tour Poly Pro on a lower tension I enjoy this racquet a lot! I've put lead at 3 and 9 and some on the handle, so I wield a flexible ~360g graphite classic.

Back to the hard courts... aaand I want something else. I've tried a Head i.Prestige 600 - no issues with it - it's a great weapon and a beautiful racquet, however due to past issues with my elbows, I do not like to THAT much effort in my strokes, so even though I adore the 90/93inch headsize - 95/98 is better for me.

I feel like I could try another 16x19 since I really like my 2nd serve with this pattern and I started practicing a semi-western grip, cause I meet lots of players who hit "baloons" when they are pushed and I hit the net with my eastern-grip (even if I jump) when the ball comes high.

I never tried a Wilson racquet although I believe that their frames might be the ones I would like the most. Everything that I bought from them is top quality - way better than any other brand IMO. I purchased the frame of an nCode 95 18x20 (for 10 EUR), but I don't want to spend 50eur on grommets + shipping (I live in Bulgaria) and I can find only 1 seller from the States, so I never tried it + I think I'm moving towards a 16x19 for both clay and hard courts.

So I wonder... What about Wilson Blade 2013? What about the Pro Staff 95 BLX? Or maybe there is a Prince that I would like... maybe another HEAD? I like my Yonex - I just wanna get my hands on something new...Oh and by the way is there any good NEW racquet? I read good things about the Pure Strike and these new Gravity/Clash sticks that look awful. I kind of hate the new racquets. I am definitely a hater of the new technologies, but at the same time I am asking myself - could I be wrong?

What do you think? Also, share your experience and your thoughts on the new (technology and production wise) sticks, please!
 
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McLovin

Legend
So I wonder... What about Wilson Blade 2013? What about the Pro Staff 95 BLX? Or maybe there is a Prince that I would like... maybe another HEAD? I like my Yonex - I just wanna get my hands on something new...Oh and by the way is there any good NEW racquet? I read good things about the Pure Strike and these new Gravity/Clash sticks that look awful. I kind of hate the new racquets. I am definitely a hater of the new technologies, but at the same time I am asking myself - could I be wrong?

What do you think? Also, share your experience and your thoughts on the new (technology and production wise) sticks, please!
I was part of the Gravity playtest (had the MP), and while I agree the PJ is ugly, they do play nicely. I'd definitely recommend you give either the new Gravity Tour or MP a swing (MP will require a butt-load of lead, but using a leather can help get you there quicker).

The VCORE Pro line from Yonex is probably your best bet if looking for a 'players' stick from them. One of my regular hitting partners (who is a 5.0) currently uses the previous VCORE Pro 97, and has been hitting the best combination of power/spin/control that I've ever seen in our 4-5 years of hitting. I've also heard good things about the VCORE 95 (if looking to stay in the 95 sq in category).

But, as @JBH suggested, getting some demos is the preferable method, especially since you can compare them w/ your regular frames at the same time. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem as though TWE has a demo program (or at least I can't find it on their site if they do).
 

iamrkoev

New User
We have pretty much nothing here when it comes to such services + 99% of the racquets that I'm interested in aren't for sale anywhere except e**y or similar websites.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
The VCORE Pro line from Yonex is probably your best bet if looking for a 'players' stick from them. One of my regular hitting partners (who is a 5.0) currently uses the previous VCORE Pro 97, and has been hitting the best combination of power/spin/control that I've ever seen in our 4-5 years of hitting. I've also heard good things about the VCORE 95 (if looking to stay in the 95 sq in category).
There is a guy here who spent time as a youth at Bollettieri's. He plays the Pro 97. Guy hits like a ton, should be really good but is a head case. I have a VCore 95 and it hits very old school, but very maneuverable. @McLovin is right.
 

Red Hood

New User
If the "holy grail"exist, we wouldn't have a demo program. Honestly, this is why technique and experience is more important than equipment.
Save that $200+ money on rackets for lessons and tournaments.
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
That's really tough if you can't demo. I think being a 4.5, you could look into such older frames like the IG Prestige MP/Pro or the 2015 Blade 98 18x20 on the auction site. You will have to try different frames to see what really fits your game. I've seen a couple of life long heavy player's racket users switched to the new Pure Aero because it provides all the spin and power they were seeking but in a controllable manner. From the new sticks, I think the Blade 98 18x20 really seems to have gotten more love than other frames.
 
Coming from a similar place a little while ago, I’m gonna say something a bit unconventional, based on some reading, experience, and calculations I’ve done lately.

Weight distribution is key. Then total weight. Then grip shape. Then type of strings / tension. Then fine-tune the frame choice...



If you’re 6’ tall, start with (m g R / I) around 21, higher if you’re shorter, lower if you’re taller. Tune the mass and swingweight from there.

I’d start with a racquet like the Blade or Srixon 200, strung with multis, and play with placing head tape and coins either over the hoop or near the handle, and see what feels best in terms of relaxed swing dynamics and effortless accuracy / depth. Then measure the configuration that feels best, and go from there.
 

WillGinRVA

New User
Coming from a similar place a little while ago, I’m gonna say something a bit unconventional, based on some reading, experience, and calculations I’ve done lately.

Weight distribution is key. Then total weight. Then grip shape. Then type of strings / tension. Then fine-tune the frame choice...



If you’re 6’ tall, start with (m g R / I) around 21, higher if you’re shorter, lower if you’re taller. Tune the mass and swingweight from there.

I’d start with a racquet like the Blade or Srixon 200, strung with multis, and play with placing head tape and coins either over the hoop or near the handle, and see what feels best in terms of relaxed swing dynamics and effortless accuracy / depth. Then measure the configuration that feels best, and go from there.
If I'm reading that graph correctly, to achieve 21, you'd want the weight of a racket to be 1.075 times the swingweight? So swingweight of 325 should have a static weight of 349g? And if you're shorter than 6', you should get a racquet that has even higher static weight compared to SW?
 
If I'm reading that graph correctly, to achieve 21, you'd want the weight of a racket to be 1.075 times the swingweight? So swingweight of 325 should have a static weight of 349g? And if you're shorter than 6', you should get a racquet that has even higher static weight compared to SW?
That’s about what the trend suggests... Take a racquet like Yonex Duel G 330 — stock, it’s about that spec, and easily tuned up or down via head tape, putty, etc. Lots of players at level 4 and up like how that stick feels, 16/20 or 16/19 being a second order effect.

Since it’s a fairly decently linear trend for most player-style racquets (that I’ve measured), the ballyhooed (m g R / I) = 21 target of top pros could be in principle replaced by a target (W / SW) number, although it won’t tell the whole story.

To illustrate, consider a dense, 300g sphere in the middle of a 50g, 27 inch long stick. Consider also a 50g stick connected on each end to 175g spheres - a dumbbell of sorts. Consider finally a 350g stick of uniform density. These three extreme cases all have the same mass, same balance point, but would feel radically different when swung from one end.

So we have all these attempts to characterize the mass distribution in a racquet, and its hard to reduce them all to one number or one ratio... Also swing styles, how a person grips the racquet, different muscle group strength — can change the dynamics (e.g. Nadal choking up on the grip for volleys, or Sampras sliding down for down the line forehands).

Anyhow, I think this is fun. I’ve got a few essentially identical racquets set up to vary the weight distribution to try things out, and I’ve also got different racquets (e.g. stuff vs. flexy, small / mid / OS) tuned to similar weight distribution. Now I plan to hit and get a sense of what works for me in a systematic way.
 

FRV2

Professional
Are you a Federer fan? If so I am surprised that you haven't figured out that the way to go is FORCE everything Roger uses to be your "holy grail"
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
This is a crazy thread. I can't tell if OP is 4'5" tall, grip size 4.5, USTA 4.5 or UTR 4.5. I personally think his 4.5 has something to do with malt beverages.
 

iamrkoev

New User
Are you a Federer fan? If so I am surprised that you haven't figured out that the way to go is FORCE everything Roger uses to be your "holy grail"
I am a fan of Grigor and Nadal. What works for them does not mean that it will work for me. We aren't and we will never be on the same level of anything related to tennis.

I use this grip, because when I was 12 I took tennis lessons for 2 years or so. It was the only one I knew since I started playing again in 2017. In my country the tennis coaches aren't giving much information. Two years ago I have learned that I use a continental grip for serves and volleys while I was trying to explain to a friend how to hold the racquet. They don't know almost anything about gear and how it impacts the game, so the kids have to figure it out by themselves or the parents should research it. They even recommend playing with a lighter racquet in order to not get injured. The majority of the kids use Head Speed and Babolat Pure Aero with full poly strings - I haven't seen even 1 with a hybrid! They also dont let them try 1H Backhand. Thats why I am also hitting bh with 2h.

Anyway.. Tennis talk, right?
 

blablavla

Hall of Fame
I am a fan of Grigor and Nadal. What works for them does not mean that it will work for me. We aren't and we will never be on the same level of anything related to tennis.

I use this grip, because when I was 12 I took tennis lessons for 2 years or so. It was the only one I knew since I started playing again in 2017. In my country the tennis coaches aren't giving much information. Two years ago I have learned that I use a continental grip for serves and volleys while I was trying to explain to a friend how to hold the racquet. They don't know almost anything about gear and how it impacts the game, so the kids have to figure it out by themselves or the parents should research it. They even recommend playing with a lighter racquet in order to not get injured. The majority of the kids use Head Speed and Babolat Pure Aero with full poly strings - I haven't seen even 1 with a hybrid! They also dont let them try 1H Backhand. Thats why I am also hitting bh with 2h.

Anyway.. Tennis talk, right?
please correct me if I am wrong, but heavy frame is not a synonym of injury free.
while there are voices claiming that most if not all injuries come from lightweight and stiff frames strung with poly strings, once a while one can see posts about similar injuries that happened with wooden frames or flexy composite frames.
so, it's not black & white.
beyond, according to internet, TE (tennis elbow) / GE (golf elbow) are not exclusive to people who play tennis and golf, it occurs from repetitive actions that over time result in this injuries, and happen as well to people that never played tennis / golf but have to do a lot of physical work during their life.

while heavy and flexy frames might have a direct correlation to smaller chance of wrist / elbow issues, they probably have a correlation with more shoulder injuries.
one needs to play with a frame that he / she is capable to swing.
 

iamrkoev

New User
please correct me if I am wrong, but heavy frame is not a synonym of injury free.
while there are voices claiming that most if not all injuries come from lightweight and stiff frames strung with poly strings, once a while one can see posts about similar injuries that happened with wooden frames or flexy composite frames.
so, it's not black & white.
beyond, according to internet, TE (tennis elbow) / GE (golf elbow) are not exclusive to people who play tennis and golf, it occurs from repetitive actions that over time result in this injuries, and happen as well to people that never played tennis / golf but have to do a lot of physical work during their life.

while heavy and flexy frames might have a direct correlation to smaller chance of wrist / elbow issues, they probably have a correlation with more shoulder injuries.
one needs to play with a frame that he / she is capable to swing.
I think that you're right, but I also think that the cases of shoulder issues are lower than TE/GE ones.
 

TennisManiac

Professional
25 people are going to give you 25 different suggestions. But if you want mine... nothing beats the Wilson Prostaff 97. Particularly the 2015 version. Followed by the Countervail. But be advised, you need to add some weight to the tip for this frame to shine.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Dear tennis fellows,

I'm looking to buy yet another racquet. Truth is - I don't even know what I want anymore.

There are many experts and lots of tennis nerds here, who tested lots of different racquets. Based on your experience - please advise me on what to buy next.

Personally - I have never used a racquet that was produced after 2006. I prefer and play more often on a hard court and I've been using mostly a LM Prestige 98 with some lead at 3 and 9 strung with a full bed of Yonex Tour Pro Poly or a hybrid with Wilson Sensation for the mains. I usually hit flat and I like to play aggressively. I love to go on to the net and do serve & volley. The Prestige is a great racquet, but if I miss the sweet spot my shots land short or even in the net, so this summer I took my Yonex RD-8, because I was playing mostly on clay. I do enjoy this surface a lot - I love to slide, but I hate the long rallies and I can't go that often to the net so basically I "beat myself" due to impatience, forced errors in my attempts to win the point aggressively and due to my flat strokes as well. The Yonex's pattern helped me to decrease the long shots (I use a slightly modified eastern grip - similar to Fed and Dimitrov's) and I also enjoyed the extra spin on my serve! Strung with a full bed of Yonex Tour Poly Pro on a lower tension I enjoy this racquet a lot! I've put lead at 3 and 9 and some on the handle, so I wield a flexible ~360g graphite classic.

Back to the hard courts... aaand I want something else. I've tried a Head i.Prestige 600 - no issues with it - it's a great weapon and a beautiful racquet, however due to past issues with my elbows, I do not like to THAT much effort in my strokes, so even though I adore the 90/93inch headsize - 95/98 is better for me.

I feel like I could try another 16x19 since I really like my 2nd serve with this pattern and I started practicing a semi-western grip, cause I meet lots of players who hit "baloons" when they are pushed and I hit the net with my eastern-grip (even if I jump) when the ball comes high.

I never tried a Wilson racquet although I believe that their frames might be the ones I would like the most. Everything that I bought from them is top quality - way better than any other brand IMO. I purchased the frame of an nCode 95 18x20 (for 10 EUR), but I don't want to spend 50eur on grommets + shipping (I live in Bulgaria) and I can find only 1 seller from the States, so I never tried it + I think I'm moving towards a 16x19 for both clay and hard courts.

So I wonder... What about Wilson Blade 2013? What about the Pro Staff 95 BLX? Or maybe there is a Prince that I would like... maybe another HEAD? I like my Yonex - I just wanna get my hands on something new...Oh and by the way is there any good NEW racquet? I read good things about the Pure Strike and these new Gravity/Clash sticks that look awful. I kind of hate the new racquets. I am definitely a hater of the new technologies, but at the same time I am asking myself - could I be wrong?

What do you think? Also, share your experience and your thoughts on the new (technology and production wise) sticks, please!
I'm rather devoted to the Volkl C10. I got my first ones a number of years ago and I've also picked up a couple of other "10-series" Volkls in more recent years. The C10 is what I consider to be a great combination of classic and modern racquets designs. It's an old-school sort of frame with its feel and flex, but it has a 98" hoop.

I had a LM Prestige mp some years ago, but that racquet didn't impress me at all compared with this Volkl. The C10 gives me more power and more comfort that what I found with the LM Prestige. I string mine with 16 or 17 ga. synthetic gut and I also have some lead added to the handles of my C10's to get a little extra head-light balance that's familiar for me.

If you like to be aggressive on the courts and hit more of a flat ball than an ultra-spinny shot, the C10 can certainly do that. One of my other Volkl models (Organix 10 325g's with lead on the hoops & handles) is much more of a spin friendly frame that I prefer for teaching/coaching. I also sometimes like these O10's for hitting with more spin on clay courts, but my favorite overall is the C10.

Most new technology with racquets today boils down to nothing but marketing gimmicks. Racquet performance is still primarily determined by the frame's weight, balance, flex, and head size. If you want to get half-decent performance and also keep your arm healthy, the C10 paired with a snug bed of synthetic gut could be great for you. It's proven to be ideal for me. Just don't string it with a poly. The flex of the racquet will not help your arm if you put a bed of poly in there. I tried it two years ago and it was lethal for me - ferocious case of tennis elbow.
 

iamrkoev

New User
Just got off the phone with a lady that sells a Prince Graphite Pro 90 in pristine condition with the original leather grip. I guess I'll give it another try with a 90inch racquet. Bought it for 15 EUR. 14x18 , graphite and fiber glass composition. ~12oz strung without a dampener. Extremely flexible. I plan to string it with Wilson Sensation and Yonex Poly Tour Pro.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
while heavy and flexy frames might have a direct correlation to smaller chance of wrist / elbow issues, they probably have a correlation with more shoulder injuries.
one needs to play with a frame that he / she is capable to swing.
I generally like to play with rackets weighing from 11.6/330 to 12.5/354, depending on flex, length and string pattern. A while back I picked up a Prince Phantom Pro 100P and couldn't get rid of that thing fast enough. I practice serving a lot and that racket and my technique combined for a very sore shoulder.

Just got off the phone with a lady that sells a Prince Graphite Pro 90 in pristine condition with the original leather grip.
I have 3 Graphite Pro 90s and I think they are one of the best of the many Prince 90 (all actually 93") rackets from the 1980s. I have around 30 Prince 90s from the 80s. I think the Graphite Pro 90 is the equal to the POG 90 but of course plays a bit differently. I have 7 POG 90s left and take one to the court every now and then. These 3 Prince 90s are the top of the heap in my opinion in no order because they all play a bit differently: POG 90, Graphite Pro 90 and Advance Response 90 (pretty maroon stick).

I don't know any UTR 12 - 9 players from 18-22 yrs old who use a racket over 11.5oz/325g . Most I know keep it at or below 11oz/310g. I know one young guy who is about 25, easy 11 utr, but is a military officer (his mom is a teaching pro), who insists on using a 10.2oz/289g racket. He is 200lb/90kilo, 73"/1.85m. Huge topspin both sides, attacks the net, serve is great, plays the short court well. Fabulous doubles player.

I don't know any Boomers and I am one, who play with anything less than 11.5oz (unless they are playing 115"+ rackets that weigh 9oz), because we don't have that kind of technique for generating that amount of RHS on just about every type of shot. We play more "linear", flatter. My frame of the day is 95" 27.5" long, 18x20 and weighs 335g. No one confuses my technique with Berretinni's.
 
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graycrait

Hall of Fame
We have pretty much nothing here when it comes to such services + 99% of the racquets that I'm interested in aren't for sale anywhere except e**y or similar websites.
I love the big auction site for tennis rackets. I have never been disappointed buying a racket on E.... Sure, sometimes there is some unidentifiable gunk on some rackets, but once cleaned nearly all have proven playable. I pretty much assume the grip will suck. I care nothing about color or style. For me, when I look on the big auction site for rackets, the key is often the grommets and headguard wear. Some headguard wear is OK to me, but once it hits the graphite I forget that racquet. Also, as you go back in time over 20 yrs some companies used some plastic formulation that were more brittle than others. This is the primary reason that I have multiple copies of various rackets - more to do about grommet "resupply" than love of the frame.
 

toottoot

New User
I just bought a Liquidmetal Prestige Mid from an auction site a week ago and instantly I knew its the best racket I have ever hit with. You should consider sticking with it.
 

iamrkoev

New User
@graycrait The grommets and the headguard is the only thing i look at, cause you cant find those easily + they cost more than a classic racquet.

I just bought a Liquidmetal Prestige Mid from an auction site a week ago and instantly I knew its the best racket I have ever hit with. You should consider sticking with it.
Never tried the LM Mid - only the MidPlus. Not inti the 18x20 pattern currently, but I'll buy one for sure and probably sell my 98 LM Prestige
 

iamrkoev

New User
Dude, this post makes me feel like you know s**t.

The more a person learns about something he starts to understand that actually - he doesn't know much. That's how I feel and it appears that many relate when it comes to finding your favorite racquet. Many pros on tour are still searching it or updating their setup.

If you have found your weapon - that's great! I am definitely glad for you and I would actually want to know more about your play style, preferences and which is your racquet of choice.
 

FedGR

Semi-Pro
@iamrkoev Don't take it too personal, this forum has some trolls or users ready to make insulting comments (but also has a ton of knowledgeable people). Just ignore them.

---
On topic, there is no holy grail as others have mentioned before. Try a couple rackets, keep the one you like the most, find the right strings and call it a day. Don't spend money meaninglessly trying to find the "perfect" racket, it's a utopia. Instead save the money and time and spend it on tennis lessons or court/tournament fees! (y) (y)

For the record a couple rackets that I have really liked out of probably 70-80 that I have tested are 2015 Blade 98 18x20, 98S and 6.1 95S, Head YTIG Radical MP and G360 Speed MP, Yonex VCP 97 330 and DR98, and Angell TC100Pro. All these offer good comfort, power, spin, feel in a maneuverable package.
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
A 4.5 in racquet is the holy grail. There used to be a video of it on this forum.

Seem to remember it had a white paint job.
 

sshin12

Rookie
Similar boat, I’m somewhere btwn a 4.0-4.5 (hs #1 singles 4 yrs, team captain for 2 yrs, team made it to state quarters for 3 of the 4 years, but not good enough for college - maybe could have played d3 but definitely not d1). Also love the old school feel. My goal was to replace the N90.

Having spent the last couple of years searching, bought 40 rackets and sold roughly half of them, here’s some stuff I picked up.

If you have the money and don’t want to go down the rabbit hole of racquetholism, get a set of matched pro stock rackets and spec them to what you need. They’re the closest you’re going to get to that pre2010 feel. Do some research to figure out what’s closest to your LM Prestige. I like the H19. Head pro stocks are raved about on this site too.

Next best thing is new, or like new condition of the older frames. Which sounds like what you’re looking for. I dug out an old RD7, iPrestige and found some good PT630s.

Now I’m not saying the new stuff is bad, but if you’re looking for the old school flex feel, stay away from Babolats, Countervail, and Graphene. These are completely different rackets than what I grew up with. Instead of growing into a racket, the objective is to tame these rackets bc they’re stiff and powerful. That’s a different mindset I’m trying to learn.

Unfortunately I’m a racket addict now and will continue down the path of trying new rackets. My latest hopes and dreams are with the new Blade v7 and the soon to be released Prestige MP. Of the new frames I’ve tried, the Yonex Vcore Pro 330 felt closest to the old school, but actively using the MG Radical MPs, PT630s and H19s.

If I could do it all over again, I’d get a set of matched PT57As and call it a day.
 

max

Legend
Interesting point about "taming" the racquet.

How much of this has to be done nowadays, which works against accuracy and good technique.

I'd chip in that. . . the racquet's not supposed to do the work. You're supposed to lean into your shots!
 

grhcan99

Semi-Pro
and don’t want to go down the rabbit hole of racquetholism,
You do not choose racquetholism. It chooses you.

Unfortunately I’m a racket addict now and will continue down the path of trying new rackets
See what I mean?

If I could do it all over again
Good luck with that.

The only solution is to run away from this forum. Run far and run fast. But too late. You're here now. Welcome to our world :)
 

megamind

Hall of Fame
You do not choose racquetholism. It chooses you.


See what I mean?


Good luck with that.

The only solution is to run away from this forum. Run far and run fast. But too late. You're here now. Welcome to our world :)
need to end that post with a muahahahaha
 

polksio

Rookie
Just buy a roll of lead tape, take your most flexy racket, make it 340SW, then add 15g of lead to the higher half of the handle. That's it, you won. Now go do footwork drills.
 

tennis347

Professional
There is no such holy grail racquet. It really comes down to personal preference and game style as well if the player has any arm issues.
 

Kevo

Legend
I've probably posted this too many times in the last almost 2 years now, but I didn't find my holy grail until I found an old PK Copper Ace for sale in our neighborhood. I think I paid maybe $15 for it, and on the first hit I knew I was going to end up buying at least 3 or 4 more. After that I got hold of a few old Rossignol frames and thought to myself how I just missed all the best frames when I was a kid. Those old school fiberglass composite frames feel so much better to me than the modern ones. There was one guy with a Rossignol on our team and I never hit with it so I was completely unaware what I was missing. The fancy stuff like ceramic, boron, and kevlar was all the rage then and that's what the rest of us played with. What a shame.

So now I play with a Rossignol 82sq in frame from the 80s and my almost new Babolat PC95s sit idle even they are also great frames.

I think there are plenty of people that would not want a flexible frame with that kind of feel, but for those that like feel and flex, the old school frames are far superior. Any modern frame with an RA higher 50 will most likely never get a serious look from me. No comparison as far as I'm concerned.

BTW, my last computer rating was also 4.5, but I've not played in leagues or tournaments in many years now and mainly just teach lessons and play for fun maybe once a week if I can work it into my schedule. I could probably play 4.5 still, but I think I might have missed my chance at becoming a 5.0 due to the back injury that took me out of competition years ago (not tennis related) and I can't seem to keep from getting older, so there's that too.
 

sshin12

Rookie
Interesting point about "taming" the racquet.

How much of this has to be done nowadays, which works against accuracy and good technique.

I'd chip in that. . . the racquet's not supposed to do the work. You're supposed to lean into your shots!
FWIW, the framing of modern rackets as “taming” came as an epiphany from several other TTW users on this thread @fuzz nation and other threads I don’t have top of mind to link. Gotta give credit where credit’s is due!

What frustrated me was that despite having every shot in the book and could easily move between wood and graphite rackets, the Babolats eluded me.

@grhcan99 - I’m just a sucker for any racket that feels like the pro tour or pro staff tours.
 

polksio

Rookie
I think there are plenty of people that would not want a flexible frame with that kind of feel, but for those that like feel and flex, the old school frames are far superior. Any modern frame with an RA higher 50 will most likely never get a serious look from me. No comparison as far as I'm concerned.
Damn and I thought I was picky by not looking at frame over 60 but looks like it's just turtles all the way down
 

Kevo

Legend
Damn and I thought I was picky by not looking at frame over 60 but looks like it's just turtles all the way down
I have a Rossignol F200 which feels more flexy than my old bancroft wood frame. It's just fantastical off the ground. It's probably close to an RA of 30. I think it might be the most amazing feeling frame for groundstrokes ever. The only problem with it is it's pretty heavy so it's a bit too much for me on serve. I think though without the heft that frame wouldn't be the beast it is. I'm sure there's a different cutoff for everyone, but if you're only trying modern frames you might be totally in the dark like I was before I happened on a garage sale PK Copper Ace.
 
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