"4-inch Swivel Move" ???

mnttlrg

Professional
Does anybody want to spoil the premium content from a Youtube channel and tell me what the "4-inch swivel move" is that can "take you from a bad college server to a top ATP server?"

I'm just dying of curiosity now.

I would actually consider paying for some of this premium content I keep seeing, except for the fact that there are a million of these things now, and they are all expensive and getting way too spammy on my Youtube account.

I hope that doesn't ruffle anyone's feathers.
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
Does anybody want to spoil the premium content from a Youtube channel and tell me what the "4-inch swivel move" is that can "take you from a bad college server to a top ATP server?"

I'm just dying of curiosity now.

I would actually consider paying for some of this premium content I keep seeing, except for the fact that there are a million of these things now, and they are all expensive and getting way too spammy on my Youtube account.

I hope that doesn't ruffle anyone's feathers.
yes, I'm waiting to hear this one too, but I'm guessing it has to do with how the racket head swivels to the outside with the shoulder turn during racket drop in the back. Sampras is one of the best examples of this motion.
 
F

FRV3

Guest
Maybe it's the airborne swivel thing I do. When you leave the ground as you attack the ball with your racket, you can coil at the hips a little more and then release all while in midair. It adds some pace to the ball and will probably injure you, but I say it's worth it.
 
Compare Jeff Selzenstein's serve to Goran Ivanišević's and you might be able to see what is the 4-inch swivel move. Jeff said it himself that he copied Ivenisevic's serve in college. I am too cheap to pay for the video but I suspect it's the shoulder turn.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
I dunno, I didnt watch the swivel move video so I really have no idea what it's about, but there's currently an active thread about shoulder turn on serve that might be on point.
 

nochuola

Rookie
I think the shoulder turn is the best guess like others have pointed out. Salzy loves talking about the "first move" in his free videos, which is basically to start the serve motion with a shoulder turn. The 4 inch might be referring to the distance between where the shoulder is before toss and where it is during/after toss.
 

EastBayPro

New User
It appears there are many threads regarding serving motion, but none that I found speaking of the 4" swivel. The 4 inches could be a vertical or horizontal dimension, or could be measured along an arc as implied by the word swivel. I suspect it is a somewhat random checkpoint to help ensure full shoulder rotation. Something like: if you can be sure to rotate your shoulders just 4 inches by a certain point in your serve, then you will be likely to continue the rotation throughout your tossing motion. But that's just an educated guess knowing that Jeff is a big proponent of shoulder rotation.
 

kaninfaan

Rookie
I think the shoulder turn is the best guess like others have pointed out. Salzy loves talking about the "first move" in his free videos, which is basically to start the serve motion with a shoulder turn. The 4 inch might be referring to the distance between where the shoulder is before toss and where it is during/after toss.
Since this thread sparked my curiosity about this "4-inch swivel move" I looked into the below Salzenstein vid and at 3.10 he refers to the "first move fix" "which is basically to start the serve motion with a shoulder turn." with "it all starts in the first six inches of the motion".

Doubt it. That distance is much more than 4 inches. More like 8 maybe.
Maybe his wife corrected the measurement? :p

 
yes, I'm waiting to hear this one too, but I'm guessing it has to do with how the racket head swivels to the outside with the shoulder turn during racket drop in the back. Sampras is one of the best examples of this motion.
Yeah, the thing I told someone not to be doing when he posted a vid of his serve. Oops! His was more like 8-10” though. No jokes! I
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
Tennis communication uses many terms that are undefined. If you can't Google the term for tennis, it is very poor for communication.

Tennis is now suffering with many terms that are not scientific and were first used when something was first noticed but not understood. "Pronation" on the serve is the flagship of all bad tennis terms....... It is always the worst to take a term that has a defined and well known use outside of tennis - in kinesiology and biomechanics - and use it incorrectly to mislead new people.

Many of the forum posts are about what posters believe about undefined tennis terms.

 
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