4 knots with multi?

#4
Many multi strings are easily damaged by getting the string twisted and having shorter sections of string to work with (like 2 piece instead of one piece) makes it is easier. Having a lower tension on the crosses or mains is just personal preference and I would not say it is either good or bad.
 
#5
Many multi strings are easily damaged by getting the string twisted and having shorter sections of string to work with (like 2 piece instead of one piece) makes it is easier. Having a lower tension on the crosses or mains is just personal preference and I would not say it is either good or bad.
So if I understand correctly, two piece is better to preserve the string during stringing?
 
#7
2 knots or 4 knots is fine. @Irvin sums up the 4 knot line of thinking rather well. 2 knots is equally as fine. There is no hands down "best option". You won't see better playability or feel the difference between 2/4 knots.
4 knots not maintain tension better when different tension in mains and crosses?
 
#8
4 knots not maintain tension better when different tension in mains and crosses?
No, IME, the maintenance of tension is directly related to the properties of the string being used. Most multis do not maintain tension well; there are exceptions. So that is the single biggest factor.

An argument can be made that the fewer knots the better the tension maintenance. This is because knots introduce tension loss by their very nature. When I string one-piece, I always make sure that the short side is tied off on a cross. In other words, I string the short side and then weave at least the first cross (sometimes two). By doing this, the last main is at tension - guaranteed. The reason for tying off on a cross is that you lose less tension due to the friction between the cross and the mains. The amount of wear and tear on a multi stringing 1-piece versus 2 is negligible. It really boils down first to the preference of the customer (as he is always right) and second to the stringer. In other words (and once again) one-piece versus two-piece has no real effect on playability or on the properties of the string job.

It's much ado about nothing. :)
 
#9
No, IME, the maintenance of tension is directly related to the properties of the string being used. Most multis do not maintain tension well; there are exceptions. So that is the single biggest factor.

An argument can be made that the fewer knots the better the tension maintenance. This is because knots introduce tension loss by their very nature. When I string one-piece, I always make sure that the short side is tied off on a cross. In other words, I string the short side and then weave at least the first cross (sometimes two). By doing this, the last main is at tension - guaranteed. The reason for tying off on a cross is that you lose less tension due to the friction between the cross and the mains. The amount of wear and tear on a multi stringing 1-piece versus 2 is negligible. It really boils down first to the preference of the customer (as he is always right) and second to the stringer. In other words (and once again) one-piece versus two-piece has no real effect on playability or on the properties of the string job.

It's much ado about nothing. :)
My problem is that I'm not sure my stringer is so precise like you in his job!! :D
 
#13
So if I understand correctly, two piece is better to preserve the string during stringing?
That’s what many say. But I think the only strings you will loose a good portion of the tneion on is where you tie starting knots and I doubt that tension loss will bleed inverted into the playing area. Also you can increase tension on tie off staring to account for loss that will develop and if you do it right most of the drawback can be eliminated.
 
#14
I do like the 3 knot idea the best!

Do you mind if piggy back on this thread though...

I have never done this as I assume it is not good technique but if the mains/crosses are using the same string is there anything wrong with Stringing 1 piece where you string the mains at one tension and then change the tension setting and string the crosses at another?

From previous posts tension does not travel from string to string so I am just curious.
 
#15
I do like the 3 knot idea the best!

Do you mind if piggy back on this thread though...

I have never done this as I assume it is not good technique but if the mains/crosses are using the same string is there anything wrong with Stringing 1 piece where you string the mains at one tension and then change the tension setting and string the crosses at another?

From previous posts tension does not travel from string to string so I am just curious.
3 knots is just an aberration! ^^
 
#16
@LOBALOT The friction of the strings where they go around the frame prevents the tension from bleeding/equalizing. I have done differential tensions [mains vs cross with same string] using 1 and 2 piece. I did not notice any difference. Neither did the client. 2 vs 4 knots is a stringer or client preference. I do 2 knots unless asked to do 4 knots. If hybriding, they get 4 knots though I wish I could figure out a way to do 3 knots. o_O
 
#17
Racket stringing is not rocket science (despite what many on this section of the boards would lead you to believe).
This should be the Gospel.


I have never done this as I assume it is not good technique but if the mains/crosses are using the same string is there anything wrong with Stringing 1 piece where you string the mains at one tension and then change the tension setting and string the crosses at another?
No, there is nothing wrong with it. Stringing 1 or 2 piece most of the time is personal preference. I string 99% of all I do as 2 piece. I just hate to mess around with super long piece of string. I do get the occasional racquet that can only be strung 1 piece, but they are few and far between around here. Some like to do 1 piece because they are trying to save a few inches of string. If you measure correctly you can still save a little string. I tend to get an extra half racquet per reel. I calculate cost and charge based on 16 racquets per reel, but typically get 17. At 40 foot per racquet a 660ft (200m) reel is good for 16.5 racquets. Some people like 1 piece to try and squeeze out 17.5 to 18 racquets per reel.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
#18
Either 2 knots or 4 knots is ok under the conditions you specify OP. There are some 1pc only racquets out there, but they are not common these days.

There’s no reason to overthink this. Assuming the mfg instructions are followed given the racquet, nothing magical (or catastrophic) is going to happen or not happen - to string it with 2 knots or 4 knots.
 
#21
4 knots with fullbed of multi with different tension on mains and crosses is a good option or not?
I will pick 4 knots


For 2 knots ,the transition from mains to cross from "X" lbs to "Y" lbs might mean that particular "Z" th cross is not properly pulled at "Y" lbs once you release the clamp on the mains.

The lower tension (mains/cross) can be tighter , and the higher tension (mains/cross) will be slightly lower.

thats my explanation for myself and myself .(Assuming no to negligible tension loss while tying the knot for 4knots scenario)

I will pick 4 knots for myself and myself.
2 knots will be a bit better if both mains and cross are pulled at the same tension.
 
#22
No, IME, the maintenance of tension is directly related to the properties of the string being used. Most multis do not maintain tension well; there are exceptions. So that is the single biggest factor.

An argument can be made that the fewer knots the better the tension maintenance. This is because knots introduce tension loss by their very nature. When I string one-piece, I always make sure that the short side is tied off on a cross. In other words, I string the short side and then weave at least the first cross (sometimes two). By doing this, the last main is at tension - guaranteed. The reason for tying off on a cross is that you lose less tension due to the friction between the cross and the mains. The amount of wear and tear on a multi stringing 1-piece versus 2 is negligible. It really boils down first to the preference of the customer (as he is always right) and second to the stringer. In other words (and once again) one-piece versus two-piece has no real effect on playability or on the properties of the string job.

It's much ado about nothing. :)
When stringing w 2 knots, how many crosses you do with short side? My thinking is that by doing more than one cross (if possible) with short side ensures better tension for the last main, compared to just one cross on the short side.
 
#23
When stringing w 2 knots, how many crosses you do with short side? My thinking is that by doing more than one cross (if possible) with short side ensures better tension for the last main, compared to just one cross on the short side.
I’ve heard many people say that very same thing. You will have more even tension on the ‘outside or last main’ if you do not run any crosses with the short side assuming your talking about an ATW pattern. If you’re talking about a 1 piece string job where the mains end at the head you’ll have more even tension stringing 2 piece.
 
#24
When stringing w 2 knots, how many crosses you do with short side? My thinking is that by doing more than one cross (if possible) with short side ensures better tension for the last main, compared to just one cross on the short side.
Typically, I weave the first cross. If I have enough string on the short side, I'll do two, weaving the 2nd then the first so the length to the tie off isn't as far. I should note that I weave the first cross on one and two-piece string jobs if possible. I say if possible because some rackets don't lend themselves to the practice, like O-ports. I'm not going to take credit for this practice as I lifted it from Richard Parnell. :)

One-piece or two really doesn't matter.
 
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