55 year old 4.0 teaching pro??

Bionic slice

Semi-Pro
Fuji, that's great that you are getting plenty of hours. Congrats on working on your degree.
I would like to use my Kinesiology degree more someday, and might look at getting a cert in a maybe in 10 -15 years from now.
 

Fuji

Legend
Fuji, that's great that you are getting plenty of hours. Congrats on working on your degree.
I would like to use my Kinesiology degree more someday, and might look at getting a cert in a maybe in 10 -15 years from now.
Thanks! Man, the hours are the hardest part though, honestly. Unless you are able to swing a solo gig at a club (which I did) dividing up hours between pros sucks. It just eats away at potential earnings. At the bigger clubs in my city, there are usually 7-9 pros. Sure they all get lessons, but if you're low on the totem poll good luck getting more than a couple privates a week. And the only court time available for beginners is 6-8am. Not pretty if you're starting out!

Mate, if you're looking at getting a coaching certificate just go out and do it. At least here, it's only a couple hundred bucks and 2 weekends of coaching training, then an evaluation. Easy peasy to do if you have some decent tennis and people skills. I think it expires every 5ish years, but it's worth having incase the opportunity comes up to teach someones kids, or to make some quick cash on like craigslist haha. I literally started out by finding a local tennis group on facebook and just doing some super simple adult beginner, eventually worked with some of their kids, then next thing I knew I was assistant pro at a huge country club, and now I'm coaching at a high level athletic performance center where various NHL/CFL/MMA guys train, and I'm helping to develop their own adult tennis program.

It's amazing what a little certificate can do for you if you're willing to put in even the most minimal efforts. Sure, it is a complete grind but lets say you start coaching now very part time, that is still experience that adds up over a couple years.

In regards to OP, if he started coaching extremely part time now, by the time he retires he could already have at least a decade of experience coaching under his belt that would be extremely useful in the long haul.

Just my 2cents of course, though. YMMV. :)

-Fuji
 

goober

Legend
Daydreaming in my cubicle....

Is it possible for a 50's year old 4.0 player to be a teaching pro? Maybe to teach beginner strategy and technique? In Florida maybe?

Has anyone else started being a teaching pro later in life? Is is possible without being REALLY good?
I know someone who started teaching in his late 50s. He called himself a 4.5 player but honestly he wouldn't even be a benchwarmer on some of the better 4.0 teams. But nonetheless he decided he was going to coach and went out and got some type of certificate. He is teaching mostly older 3.5-4.0 ladies and strings racquets on the side. I think he is a very marginal coach but he knows how to talk to middle ladies and has a following. I am not sure how rewarding it is to him but it probably beats his former cubicle job.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I know someone who retired as a baggage handler for United with bum knees, and then became a teaching pro. He is a good 3.5 at most.
 

dblsplayer

Rookie
No way someone over 50 and only a 4.0 level can coach, just ask Nick Bollettieri.

Why would anyone think an older coach has to be better than the younger athlete he coaches. If that was the case, the coaches would be competing and the athletes would be watching.

Coaching aka teaching is more than just playing ability.

I know, but, but but.... what if, what if, what if....
 

TobyTopspin

Professional
There are quite a few coaches here that may be even lower than 4.0. They are in the minority as most of the pros around here at the bigger clubs are still relatively young and out of college or played the changers for a while.

But, there are quite a few guys that you will see at the local parks bringing in carts that can't sustain a rally with a solid 4.0, but they can feed like nobody's business. They usually teach low level to intermediate (3.5ish), but they seem to do a great job.
 

monomer

Rookie
I know someone who started teaching in his late 50s. He called himself a 4.5 player but honestly he wouldn't even be a benchwarmer on some of the better 4.0 teams. But nonetheless he decided he was going to coach and went out and got some type of certificate. He is teaching mostly older 3.5-4.0 ladies and strings racquets on the side. I think he is a very marginal coach but he knows how to talk to middle ladies and has a following. I am not sure how rewarding it is to him but it probably beats his former cubicle job.
The fact is that a tennis pro is selling a product. To be successful you just have to convince enough people to buy what you are selling.

Maybe that is a high level certification and great tennis skill. It might be some innovative method of instruction. The instructor might have a knack for identifying and correcting technical flaws. Maybe the person has limited skill but is exceptional dealing with kids (better yet, the mommies).

The OP doesn't need to be a great player but he does have to offer something that people want to buy.
 

GuyClinch

Legend
The vast majority of teaching pros have BEEN way above 4.0 and are just on the way down with old age. Just because some old guy is now a 3.5 - doesn't mean some 3.5 hack should be teaching tennis.

And no Nick Bolleteri doesn't count because he is the owner of a teaching school - and wouldn't be a real tennis pro on his own.

The big issue is that teaching pros are almost always expected to be hitters as well. its hard to hit with your students if you are an at best 4.0. The older 'sinking' 4.0s tend to have good strokes when they get balls hit back to them - they are just losing mobility..

It's not the same as a 4.0 guy that runs balls down..
 
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