9 racket lengths not enough for 16x18 ?

27" racket. I always do 9 racket lengths for mains.
For my 16x18 100 size racket, I just barely had enough for the mains.
Like I could only get 1/2 the wheel pinched with string for both ends of the mains.
Literally not 1" to spare on either side! Lucky day for me.

I've never had this issue.
I always counted out 9 racket lengths and always had tons to spare.
And it's gut, which has some stretch.
 

jim e

Legend
If you had 1 inch less on each side you could have still finished the job, as with a starting clamp it can be used as a bridge.
I know you commented before, you only found one use for a starting clamp, but in reality there are many uses for it.You need to pay attention to what other posters here comment on and learn rather than argue and call names when you have no idea.
 

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
I have a 3 foot mark on my work bench and I measure referencing the Klipper site if a new racquet or my log book which I track/refine what I needed the previous time. For a full set of gut and a racquet I have not strung before I cut it in half so I measure out 20' as I don't want to take a chance on leaving the remainder too short for another racquet and as Jim noted I can bridge if needed.

I have 2 starting clamps one I leave on my machine the other already setup with scrap poly to bridge with in the drawer of my workbench within easy reach. Should I need the bridging clamp for another purpose then I remove the scrap string and use it.

If it is a racquet I have strung before (I use gut mains) and I have confidence in my measurements I may short the gut used to say 19' or 18' leaving myself with a tad extra on the remainder just in case the next racquet is new to me and needs it.
 

Strawbewwy

Rookie
different frames have different proportions/spacing

a mid size will require less string than an over size

for me i always count # of main string divided by 2 racquet lengths, ie) 16 main = 8 racquet lengths, 18 main = 9 racquet lengths for 93+, for 90- i subtract another half racquet length, but for anything over 100 i use the actual hoop to measure the same number of mains, ie) 16 mains = 16 middle of the hoop counts (the longest main)

some specific ones use less/more, for example a duel g with no main skips i can follow the mid size rule and have sufficient
 
That would not work for me.
I have 16x18 (100) and 9 rackets barely worked.
I will need to use 9.5 rackets, and still be uncomfortable close.
 

Moppet52

Rookie
I have 2 starting clamps one I leave on my machine the other already setup with scrap poly to bridge with in the drawer of my workbench within easy reach. Should I need the bridging clamp for another purpose then I remove the scrap string and use it.
This.
 

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
I have had a starting clamp hold 60 Lbs. Recently, I had to bridge gut mains on a friends racquet at 58 lbs without issue.

The guys here showed me how to use a starting clamp to bridge some time ago and since then it is no problem. I bet the thread is still out there.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
That would not work for me.
I have 16x18 (100) and 9 rackets barely worked.
I will need to use 9.5 rackets, and still be uncomfortable close.
The Gamma starting clamp is a super useful investment. I highly recommend it - holds 60 lbs. no problemo.

When I measure string for my mains or crosses, I use a different method than yours. Since the head sizes and numbers of mains or crosses will vary with different racquets, I figured out how to use the racquet's hoop to get an appropriate length for either the mains or the crosses that's usually accurate within several inches (no need to waste 2 or 3 feet of extra string to finish the mains or crosses).

If you've ever seen anybody doing a string job using a one-piece method, they need to measure out the "short side", which is only enough for half of the mains, plus a little to tie off. To measure that out from a full set, the stringer stretches lengths from one end across the hoop from 12 to 6 o'clock - if it's a 16 main racquet, 8 mains are measured out. That length of string is enough to do half the mains and also tie off.

So if I'm doing a racquet with 18 mains that's let's say an older 90" mid, I just measure off half the mains with string from an individual set or off of a reel - lengths of string running between 12 and 6 o'clock. That gives me half the mains, so then I just double it back on itself to get the length I need for all of them. Then I'll add perhaps 6"-12" and cut it there.

Now if you have a starting clamp, it's not necessary to add any extra to that measured length. Some racquets with dense patterns and larger heads will use up most of an individual set, so you may not want to leave much extra on what you've measured out for the mains if that's going to make it rather close - maybe not enough - to finish your crosses.

Even if you don't have quite enough to reach your tensioner with your last main or your last cross, the starting clamp will let you make a bridge to the tensioner using a scrap piece of string and finish it up. I'll bet that once you get a starting clamp, you'll be almost as excited about it as you were when you got your new Gamma machine.

When doing the crosses, I measure the amount I need by stretching lengths across the hoop between 3 and 9 o'clock. If the racquet has 19 crosses, I measure off 9 lengths of string, plus half a length, then double all that on itself. 9.5 x 2 = 19 crosses.

Long winded explanation, but this measuring technique made life much easier for me after I figured it out. Easy to measure just enough for mains or crosses without wasting a lot of extra string, but also just about bullet-proof for making sure that I have enough to do all the mains or crosses. No worries about coming up short if I'm installing a full set of natural gut or pricey multifiber. And if I'm not wasting extra string off my reels, I'm probably getting at least an extra half set from it before it runs out.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
Not trying to start an argument but is there a possibility that you miscounted? I’ve been stringing quite a while and not remotely close to the length of time @jim e or @Irvin has been stringing and never had an issue with 20 feet or 9 racquet lengths except for one particular racquet and using Kevlar. That racquet was the Head Youtek IG Radical MP. Kevlar doesn’t stretch but gut and synthetic guts definitely do. I have miscounted more than once or mismeasured. If using a set, I just wrap the string around a pole and walkout until I have equal lengths and cut it at the middle. Never had an issue there. I have cut a set in different lengths such as 22 and 18 and accidentally grabbed the wrong length.

Life lessons.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Not trying to start an argument but is there a possibility that you miscounted? I’ve been stringing quite a while and not remotely close to the length of time @jim e or @Irvin has been stringing and never had an issue with 20 feet or 9 racquet lengths except for one particular racquet and using Kevlar. That racquet was the Head Youtek IG Radical MP. Kevlar doesn’t stretch but gut and synthetic guts definitely do. I have miscounted more than once or mismeasured. If using a set, I just wrap the string around a pole and walkout until I have equal lengths and cut it at the middle. Never had an issue there. I have cut a set in different lengths such as 22 and 18 and accidentally grabbed the wrong length.

Life lessons.
I assume you’re talking to OP but 20’ for a mid plus is generally more than enough string IMO. I can’t imagine there being an issue with my machine or Jim’s machine for that matter. But the OP is probably using a poly string with a rotary gripper. That machine is going to take a longer length of string to put the end of the string in the gripper. Also if the OP uses his starting clamp as a bridge it may present a problem because he must put 2 ends of string in the gripper and that may not be easy to do. I have used a bridge on my X2 but I had to tie a knot the scrap string on to block the string from slipping through the eye, then put the single string in the gripper.
 
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Not sure. It has never ever been this close. I usually have lots of string left over for each knot.
Maybe I need to double check the base mount, I know it is skewed to one side,
and I should make sure the THROAT is the side that is closest to the tension head.
That might well be it ?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Not sure. It has never ever been this close. I usually have lots of string left over for each knot.
Maybe I need to double check the base mount, I know it is skewed to one side,
and I should make sure the THROAT is the side that is closest to the tension head.
That might well be it ?
Throat closest to tension head? That MUST be set by the racket if the racket is a 16 main and starts in the throat it end in the throat. If it starts at the head it will end at the head.
 

jim e

Legend
Not sure. It has never ever been this close. I usually have lots of string left over for each knot.
Maybe I need to double check the base mount, I know it is skewed to one side,
and I should make sure the THROAT is the side that is closest to the tension head.
That might well be it ?
Your racquet the end mains end at throat.
I have no idea what your comment is that you make sure throat is side closest to tension head, as if you tension last mains the tension head will be at throat end. Are you saying that possibly you did not tension end mains?
 
The mounting rack itself can be slid off-center.
My machine is configured such that the entire rotating platform is off-center.
One set of end mounts are closer to the tension head than the opposite side.

Look closely.
See how left end mount is closer to the end of platform than the right side? Slot visible.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Look closely.
See how left end mount is closer to the end of platform than the right side? Slot visible.
Look closely there is an adjust below each standard to move the standards in and out. You can move the standards so the racket is centered. You can also move the standard on the end where your mains tie off closer to the edge of the turntable you move the tension head effectively closer to the center of the racket. You also have another option you can center the standard out and use the 6&12 supports to hold the racket. If you leave your standards centered and only adjust the 6&12 supports you can also avoid the side supports from blocking any grommet holes.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yes, that's the entire point.
You adjust it so that the throat can be closer to the tensioner head.
Of course, you need to remember to mount the racket the right direction!
You have it backwards. The standard will be closer but the head of the racket is held by the top standard if you want the string to reach the tensioner you must lower the head.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I have no idea what you're saying
The racket must move down not the standard. If the standard hold the head of the racket at the same position, and the head of the racket hold the string the distance from the head of the racket to the tensioner remains the same no matter what you do to the bottom standard. If you move the bottom standard closer to the tensioner you must move the 6 support out to support the racket. The supports hold the racket not the standards, and the standards hold the supports.

EDIT: Try mounting any racket on your machine. Then move the bottom (throat standard out toward the edge of the turntable. To do that you must move the 6 support in toward the center of the turntable but the racket never changes position. Because the racket never moves the string you’re string in it can not move.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
@TimeToPlaySets youre coming from a 2 point X2 machine. With that machine you move the standard to support the frame. With a 6 point machine it is not the standard but the billiard (6&12 supports) that hold the frame. If you leave the billiards all the way against the standard and move the standard in and out to mount the racket you will have blocked grommets because the side supports cover them up or you will be tensioning a stringaround the side support and the string will not be in a straight line to the tension gripper. The string will be deflected by the side supports.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
I assume you’re talking to OP but 20’ for a mid plus is generally more than enough string IMO. I can’t imagine there being an issue with my machine or Jim’s machine for that matter. But the OP is probably using a poly string with a rotary gripper. That machine is going to take a longer length of string to put the end of the string in the gripper. Also if the OP uses his starting clamp as a bridge it may present a problem because he must put 2 ends of string in the gripper and that may not be easy to do. I have used a bridge on my X2 but I had to tie a knot the scrap string on to block the string from slipping through the eye, then put the single string in the gripper.
He said gut.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Does not really matter the racket needs to be adjusted closer to the tensioner or use a longer string.
I was just offering clarification.

IDK how 9 x 27” = 243” / 12” = 20.25’ of any material string is barely enough for any 16 main racquet. That it is gut which stretches a lot more than poly or Kevlar makes it even more of an impossibility. But if anyone can struggle with 20.25’ of gut for a 16 main racquet, it would be TTPS.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I was just offering clarification.

IDK how 9 x 27” = 243” / 12” = 20.25’ of any material string is barely enough for any 16 main racquet. That it is gut which stretches a lot more than poly or Kevlar makes it even more of an impossibility. But if anyone can struggle with 20.25’ of gut for a 16 main racquet, it would be TTPS.
For one thing a rotary gripper needs more string than a linear gripper. On my X2 if I don’t use a starting clamp for a bridge I need about 18” more string. The higher the racket is mounted the farther the racket is from the tensioner. For every 1” you mount the racket higher you need an extra 2” of string.

EDIT: I think it is as simple as not understanding the machine and use of tools on @TimeToPlaySets part.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
For one thing a rotary gripper needs more string than a linear gripper. On my X2 if I don’t use a starting clamp for a bridge I need about 18” more string. The higher the racket is mounted the farther the racket is from the tensioner. For every 1” you mount the racket higher you need an extra 2” of string.
My first machine was an Eagnas machine with a rotational gripper. Honestly can’t remember stringing details from over 10 years ago now. Given that it was on an Eagnas, I probably intentionally tried to forget my experience on that machine.
 

cluckcluck

Hall of Fame
I swear that 90% of the questions asked OP's posts get answered in 1-2 replies... Yet they seem to drag on and on for dozens more than necessary... Wonder why that could be??? :unsure:
Because OP is pretty much asking for handholding or a skype call to walk him through every question he has; because OP is simply ignoring any answers. Also he's quite argumentative, which is annoying.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Because OP is pretty much asking for handholding or a skype call to walk him through every question he has; because OP is simply ignoring any answers. Also he's quite argumentative, which is annoying.
Actually he doesn’t ignore answers. he doesn’t understand the answers and therefore concludes that they are stupid because he is unwilling and unable to spend the time to comprehend.
 

NDStrings

New User
Since you stated you always have plenty of string, but this time you didn't, did you just not measure correctly or move your hand and cut it short? I have a machine with the same mounting system and have never moved the standards after centering them on the table the very first time. Great comments about the use of a starting clamp. A quality clamp, that is clean, can hold plenty of tension when used as bridge. In the end, you had enough string to finish the mains. Measure carefully, get a good starting clamp, keep it clean, and string away.
 
I do not think I miscounted the 9 lengths.
I am very deliberate when I do this.

I did not have this issue with ZX since I pre-stretch and get another foot.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I assume you’re talking to OP but 20’ for a mid plus is generally more than enough string IMO. I can’t imagine there being an issue with my machine or Jim’s machine for that matter. But the OP is probably using a poly string with a rotary gripper. That machine is going to take a longer length of string to put the end of the string in the gripper. Also if the OP uses his starting clamp as a bridge it may present a problem because he must put 2 ends of string in the gripper and that may not be easy to do. I have used a bridge on my X2 but I had to tie a knot the scrap string on to block the string from slipping through the eye, then put the single string in the gripper.
Just an aside - I string with a Gamma Prog. II ELS and when I use my starting clamp to make a bridge to the tensioner (rotary gripper), I typically use a scrap of syn. gut. My gripper has had no issues with holding the two ends of that scrap piece and I don't need to arrange them a certain way for the gripper to effectively hold them.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Just an aside - I string with a Gamma Prog. II ELS and when I use my starting clamp to make a bridge to the tensioner (rotary gripper), I typically use a scrap of syn. gut. My gripper has had no issues with holding the two ends of that scrap piece and I don't need to arrange them a certain way for the gripper to effectively hold them.
Some people have issues getting 1 string wrapped around a rotary gripper I can imagine even more problems with 2 strings. I actually never tried it I just tied a string on one of my starting clamps and use it for bridging only.
 
Gonna try 9 racket lengths again
and keep my fingers crossed

If I use 9.5 racket lengths,
the other half of the 40 ft set will be useless

Doing ZX mains
so I will get stretch.
 

jim e

Legend
9 racquet lengths is 20.25 feet, for a normal length racquet. Should be more than enough for a 16 main racquet.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
9 racquet lengths is 20.25 feet, for a normal length racquet. Should be more than enough for a 16 main racquet.
It does not matter, the real question is, if 19’ 9” (the other half) is enough for the next racket.

EDIT: What if he really needs 20.5’ of string? He’s been told how to make it work before so I don’t believe he wasn’t help he’s just trolling. If for some unknown reason he needs more than 20’ of ZX for a 16 main mid+ he needs more help than we can give him.
 
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