A guide to tennis balls - what you WANT to know!

Solid Ace

Banned
Great thread, should be stickied.
I was just about to go to buy a lot of balls. I may buy these Technifibre X One balls (yes, they're sold in my country) or Dunlop Fort.
 

GPG

Semi-Pro
i would like to add Dunlop Championship Allcourt. Cheap, bounce perfectley and last a lot

 

mikeler

Moderator

jrod

Hall of Fame
Please Make Sticky

This information is constantly sought by TT members. Please make this thread sticky.

Good job mtommer!
 

mtommer

Hall of Fame
heh. my coach uses these balls for game days, while he insists on the ProPenn balls for practice.

just simply odd.
Maybe, it depends. If in practice one is hitting the ball a lot more often then the added quality of the ball adds up to cost savings over time as you don't have to keep opening cans. Conversely, the Championship balls are fine for match play and I'm guessing your coach goes through fewer balls in match situations thus the cost savings could be better. Then again, the coach just might be odd. :D
 

mtommer

Hall of Fame
This information is constantly sought by TT members. Please make this thread sticky.

Good job mtommer!
Thanks! It is a sticky and anyone needing to access this thread can do so by the FAQ sticky at the top of the page along with several other fine threads.
 
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SpiralEdge

New User
I'm interested in buying tennis balls to fill up a hopper so I'm looking forward to buying the Dunlop Grand Prix, but one thing confuses me. On this site, the Dunlop GrandPrix XD Tennis Balls are offered. However, on another site, two types of Dunlop Grand Prix balls are offered: hard court and regular duty. I plan to be playing on public courts located outside, so what's the difference between the hard court balls and the ones offered on this site?
 

dancraig

Hall of Fame
I'm interested in buying tennis balls to fill up a hopper so I'm looking forward to buying the Dunlop Grand Prix, but one thing confuses me. On this site, the Dunlop GrandPrix XD Tennis Balls are offered. However, on another site, two types of Dunlop Grand Prix balls are offered: hard court and regular duty. I plan to be playing on public courts located outside, so what's the difference between the hard court balls and the ones offered on this site?

The hard court balls are more durable, the regular are more for clay courts.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/feedback.html?pcode=DTBC
 
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KOPT

Rookie
Great guide,one thing i was always wondering about were the little numbers on the balls,like 2 in one can of exact same balls that are marked 4 in the other can.Before i was sure that represents the hardness of the ball,but after i googled the answer turns out the are numbered only to distinguish your balls from the people on the next court who might be playing with the same balls that are numbered different.
 
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What has happened to tennis balls these days? Slazenger used to be good, though a bit heavy for the first couple of games. Wilson were great. Penn ok for 2 sets.

Now every ball is terrible. The Slazengers fluff up to double their sze. The Dunlops stop bouncing after 30 minutes. Wilson Australian Open fly around for one set and then don't bounce. The US Open balls are terrible. HELP. I can't find anything I like enough to buy a box of.

It all started to go wrong with those cra*ppy Wilson Titanium balls. Now half the people you play with have those cheap Wilson balls in the red tube, that just don't bounce. I never thought I would hear myself saying it, but at least with Tretorn you know what you are getting. I am starting to think I need to buy a Roddick GT so it doesn't make any difference what balls you use. I just want a decent 4 ball tube I can use for one match, and maybe hit with the next day, before throwing them. Half the balls on the market today, I wouldn't even give to my dog.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Durability-wise, nothing beats the dunlops.

I like the Wilson's as a compromise between playability
and durability. Every once in a while I a get some dunlops
that feel like I'm hitting rocks, though.
 

mikeler

Moderator
What has happened to tennis balls these days? Slazenger used to be good, though a bit heavy for the first couple of games. Wilson were great. Penn ok for 2 sets.

Now every ball is terrible. The Slazengers fluff up to double their sze. The Dunlops stop bouncing after 30 minutes. Wilson Australian Open fly around for one set and then don't bounce. The US Open balls are terrible. HELP. I can't find anything I like enough to buy a box of.

It all started to go wrong with those cra*ppy Wilson Titanium balls. Now half the people you play with have those cheap Wilson balls in the red tube, that just don't bounce. I never thought I would hear myself saying it, but at least with Tretorn you know what you are getting. I am starting to think I need to buy a Roddick GT so it doesn't make any difference what balls you use. I just want a decent 4 ball tube I can use for one match, and maybe hit with the next day, before throwing them. Half the balls on the market today, I wouldn't even give to my dog.

Prince balls have great bounce. I've had some minor problems with the hard court version though. Sometimes I'll hear stuff rattling around inside the ball. The clay court Prince balls are awesome. An old ball in my bag for a month will bounce higher than almost any other ball fresh out of the can.
 

tenniscan

New User
Any comments on Volkl balls? We used them in Turkey for a tournament...they seemed bigger in diameter than the Dunlop Fort balls (I compared them) and were slow and heavy feeling. The Americans weren't fans of the Volkls (or the slow clay). The Dunlop Fort ball is pretty good. Also, I've played with Gammas, they are horrible, very hard, gave me arm problems!
 

Lefty78

Professional
3. Dunlop Roland Garros
- These balls are labeled specifically for Roland Garros (French Open). On Dunlop's website they have their own section, seperate from the other Dunlop ball offerings. I do not know if these balls are specifically made for the Roland Garros tournament or if they are restamped Fort Plus balls. Suffice it to say, if you play on clay, you can't go wrong. I know of no US offerings though for this ball.
I get these balls at a local shop in Boca Raton, Florida. They are the best I've ever used on clay. I also don't know if these are designed specifically for RG, but they are indeed the actual balls used in the tourney. One thing to note: They are larger in diameter than Penn and Wilson balls. In Europe, I believe they sell three different models of this line.
 

Pwned

Hall of Fame
I've found the Penn ATP balls last a lot longer than US Open Wilson's. I am quite surprised how quick the US Open balls lose their felt, color, and bounce.
 
What about Tens balls, they are very similiar to US Open balls, but with more durability.

Also what are the best pressureless balls besides Tretorn?
 

Sleepstream

Semi-Pro
I've found the Penn ATP balls last a lot longer than US Open Wilson's. I am quite surprised how quick the US Open balls lose their felt, color, and bounce.
I think there is a difference between US Open balls used at the tournament and those sold to the public.

I've had a chance to hit with some US Open balls used by a university, and I find they have better bounce, durability, and felt than those purchased at stores.
 

mtommer

Hall of Fame
I think there is a difference between US Open balls used at the tournament and those sold to the public.

I've had a chance to hit with some US Open balls used by a university, and I find they have better bounce, durability, and felt than those purchased at stores.
At Western Michigan Univ., Eastern Mich U (when they had a team) and U of Mich I know retail cans were used at least some of the time. This was back in the late 90's. I was there at times when the coaches for EMU or U of M came into Cayman (when they were on Washtenaw) and left with four or five cases at a time. I've been in adjacent courts at Western as the team was just coming on to practice. Retail marked cases and packaging in the equipment sheds on court. These are all Div. 1A schools.
 

dadozen

Hall of Fame
I thought that Wilson Titanium and Wilson Championship would be on different levels. Wilson Championship loses pressure and playability real quicky.

I like Babolat Trophy as well. Could you tell us a little more about it?
 

Chelsea_Kiwi

Hall of Fame
CK,

I would argue strongly that they are the same ball. It is not uncommon for packaging to change merely to boost sales by "looking" different.
Ok thanks for your reply. The only problem is in my country one is $13 and the other $18 for a can of 3??? I think the $18 are the new packaging.
 

madmanfool

Semi-Pro
I'm from Belgium and this is my sharing:

Dunlop

This is the Dunlop ball around here: Donlup fort (all court)



And here is the new package from recently:



This baby is the real deal. I think they make for like 20 years or something. Everybody plays with these around here. There is a reason it says world's # 1 ball on the box. Great feel and longlivety.

I also want to add this: Dunlop brilliance
This is like a cheaper version, but still the quality of a Dunlop. Great value for money and very well suited for beginners. Takes some time to get used to as they are quite unique.



Babolat

Why aren't these mentioned yet? Babolat makes balls people. And some very good ones i might add.

First: Babolat team
This is like the Dunlop fort of Babolat, but it lasts longer and is a slightly heavier ball. They also play better than the Dunlop when being just out the box. Best Babolat ball for sure.

 
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madmanfool

Semi-Pro
Second: Babolat VS
Heavier than the team and because of that more longlivety. Also more expensive. Great if you want a ball with which you can play like forever.


Balls i don't like: Tretorn, Slazenger (both too heavy), Wilson (for Grandpa, useless on clay)
 
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mtommer

Hall of Fame
Why aren't these mentioned yet? Babolat makes balls people. And some very good ones i might add.
I am in the US so my personal exposure to ball brands is limited. I'm glad this board has such a diversity of posters. Thank you for providing additional information on other brands like the Babolat balls you posted. If you don't mind, would it be all right if I edited in your information on the Babolat balls into my original guide?
 

madmanfool

Semi-Pro
I am in the US so my personal exposure to ball brands is limited. I'm glad this board has such a diversity of posters. Thank you for providing additional information on other brands like the Babolat balls you posted. If you don't mind, would it be all right if I edited in your information on the Babolat balls into my original guide?
Be my guest
 

masterxfob

Semi-Pro
i had some students bring pro spirit balls to a group lesson. the felt looked matted and the balls looked to be about 15% smaller. i just threw them away, but do you care to review that one for me?
 

mtommer

Hall of Fame
i had some students bring pro spirit balls to a group lesson. the felt looked matted and the balls looked to be about 15% smaller. i just threw them away, but do you care to review that one for me?
Pro Spirit is a generic ball, Tier 3. They are from Target I believe.
 

darryl_giggs

New User
The Slazengers are heavy when new, making it difficult to impart spin and control. However, when they are heavily used and the fluff is all gone, they become extremely bouncy and difficult to control.

Somewhere between being new and heavily used, the ball feels great! All-in-all, they are tournament balls that should follow the tournament rules regarding usage (i.e. change after 7 or 9 games).

I've played Wilson US Open balls in Asia and in the US itself, and I have to say that they feel very different. In US, these balls are harder and heavier, someone mentioned to me that its akin to hitting rocks. However, back in Asia where I live, the Wilson US Open balls are lively, soft and have just the right bounce for control. Not sure if there are different manufacturing facilities for these balls, which might explain the difference.

All things considered and based on my experiences in the US and in Asia, I find the Wilson Championships the best value-for-money in terms of playability and durability (as compared to all the available models from Penn, Dunlop, Prince, Babolat etc). Basically, if it ain't a tournament, you cannot go wrong with the Wilson Championships. I was picking these balls up at Sports Authority at $1.89 per can and using them both as practice balls and for friendly match play ---- I think the Penn Championships come in a close second for best value-for-money.

This thread is extremely useful for tennis players at any level because many players under-rate the importance of the brand/model/type of ball for their game. I personally think that its just as important as the racket and the strings (equipment-wise).

My $0.02
 

Fedace

Banned
If someone can invent a ball that plays about 50-60 hours of play before it goes dead, that maybe what will make all the balls obsolete.
 
I think there is a difference between US Open balls used at the tournament and those sold to the public.

I've had a chance to hit with some US Open balls used by a university, and I find they have better bounce, durability, and felt than those purchased at stores.
There is a difference I swiped 5 cases from the USOPEN and they don't play like the crap sold in stores.
 

aphex

Banned
The Slazengers are heavy when new, making it difficult to impart spin and control. However, when they are heavily used and the fluff is all gone, they become extremely bouncy and difficult to control.

Somewhere between being new and heavily used, the ball feels great! All-in-all, they are tournament balls that should follow the tournament rules regarding usage (i.e. change after 7 or 9 games).

I've played Wilson US Open balls in Asia and in the US itself, and I have to say that they feel very different. In US, these balls are harder and heavier, someone mentioned to me that its akin to hitting rocks. However, back in Asia where I live, the Wilson US Open balls are lively, soft and have just the right bounce for control. Not sure if there are different manufacturing facilities for these balls, which might explain the difference.

All things considered and based on my experiences in the US and in Asia, I find the Wilson Championships the best value-for-money in terms of playability and durability (as compared to all the available models from Penn, Dunlop, Prince, Babolat etc). Basically, if it ain't a tournament, you cannot go wrong with the Wilson Championships. I was picking these balls up at Sports Authority at $1.89 per can and using them both as practice balls and for friendly match play ---- I think the Penn Championships come in a close second for best value-for-money.

This thread is extremely useful for tennis players at any level because many players under-rate the importance of the brand/model/type of ball for their game. I personally think that its just as important as the racket and the strings (equipment-wise).

My $0.02

I disagree...if anything, they have TOO much spin in the first few minutes...
btw, i think they are the best balls out there...
 
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