About attemps on get an "open era" before 1968

Q&M son

Professional
#1
I recently read on McCauley book that in 1961 the was a votation on ILTF about the issue over pros joining amateurs, but 2/3 votes was needed and don't got the numbers to made it.
Anybody has some info about this? Sorry I don't have the book with me now to add more detalis to this thread.
Thanks in advance.

Lucio.
 
#3
I think, there was once a vote on open tennis during a ILTF session in Paris, in 1959 or 1961. I read, that it failed narrowly, because the deciding 3 or 4 voters were absent, because they had spent the night in some Paris nightclubs and with some nice erotic activities, and laid sleeping in bed. Immediately after World War 2 it looked good for open tennis, because like in other sports (Golf, Basketball,) the hunger for professional sports in the US evolved, and TV came upon the sports scene. But unlike in Golf the ruling amateur institutions stayed against pro tennis, and the pro promoters like Jack Kramer intensified the rift. Jack Kramer's politics of buying out every amateur champion after another, made the amateur federations even more angry, and no settlement was reached. The pro circuit grew stronger, when turning to tournament format, instead of one night stands. In the mid 60s, it was the initiative of Wimbledon and its chairman Herman David, which brought the change to open tennis. He noticed, that his World Championship tournament had not the best players in it, and he installed the premier pro tennis event on the sacred courts, in August 1967. It was shown in color on BBC and was a great financial success. That opened the road. David announced, that the Wimbledon Champs would go open for pros the next year, and other federations followed, most very reluctantly. Their most adored competition, the Davis Cup, stayed strictly amateur until 1973.
 
#4
I read old articles about development in 1967.. didn't know Britain wanted so badly for Wimbledon next year

Maybe some of you know more about that period, until April 1968
 
#5
I think, there was once a vote on open tennis during a ILTF session in Paris, in 1959 or 1961. I read, that it failed narrowly, because the deciding 3 or 4 voters were absent, because they had spent the night in some Paris nightclubs and with some nice erotic activities, and laid sleeping in bed. Immediately after World War 2 it looked good for open tennis, because like in other sports (Golf, Basketball,) the hunger for professional sports in the US evolved, and TV came upon the sports scene. But unlike in Golf the ruling amateur institutions stayed against pro tennis, and the pro promoters like Jack Kramer intensified the rift. Jack Kramer's politics of buying out every amateur champion after another, made the amateur federations even more angry, and no settlement was reached. The pro circuit grew stronger, when turning to tournament format, instead of one night stands. In the mid 60s, it was the initiative of Wimbledon and its chairman Herman David, which brought the change to open tennis. He noticed, that his World Championship tournament had not the best players in it, and he installed the premier pro tennis event on the sacred courts, in August 1967. It was shown in color on BBC and was a great financial success. That opened the road. David announced, that the Wimbledon Champs would go open for pros the next year, and other federations followed, most very reluctantly. Their most adored competition, the Davis Cup, stayed strictly amateur until 1973.
This is all true.
But there is more to the story.
Lamar Hunt was a tennis fan with deep pockets, and he signed the Handsome Eight to pro contracts in 1967, including the dominant amateur, John Newcombe, and his buddy Tony Roche, the two biggest draws left in the amateurs.
The remaining amateurs still included Ashe, Emerson, an injured Santana, an emerging Okker, but clearly the top sixteen or more players were now pro.
The big major tournaments had to open their doors.
Lamar Hunt lost millions with the Handsome Eight, but he had deep pockets.
 
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