Adidas Solecourt Boost Official Thread

Hola, tengo los Ubersonic 3 en talla US 9.5 y realmente tienen un ajuste perfecto con dos pares de calcetines, yo quería saber si los Solecourt Boost los tendría que pedir en la misma talla o bien ir por una media talla menos.
Hola, recomendaria pedir SoleCourt Boost en el mismo tamano que Ubersonic 3. No es necesario que disminuya el tamano para SCB.
 
Any clue on coming colorways? I love the shoe but the colors are terrible. Give me all black with lime green dots ftw please and thank you

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I can help you guys who are considering the adidas crazylight boost (the basketball shoe): I have bought it. It is very comfortable but also heavy. BUT - it is very high from the ground and that makes it impossible to use for tennis if you like to run even a little bit! It is too clumsy and you get up too high off the ground and lose your agility and risk to injure your ankles and achilles tendon.
It's certainly heavier and more ponderous than the Court FF's that I also play in, but I don't think your characterization is accurate. I've had other tennis shoes that felt even more cumbersome. The NB 604 comes to mind, and it's a popular shoe among middle-aged and older players. Also, if the Prince T22 is agile and stable enough for someone, then I think he would probably be fine with the CLB. It's a popular shoe in the NBA, and I don't think these professional basketball players want to risk ankle and achilles injuries either.
 
OK so I am going to buy this shoes to try out. mostly for jogging and running and training. How does the sizing work on this model ? If you wear size 10 on Yonex shoes, should I buy size 10 on this Adidas ?
 
Just got a pair of SoleCourt Boosts.

First Impressions:

1) Not cheap, either in cost or materials, its a premium shoe
2) Bit heavier than my Babolat SFX3's but on par with my old Asics GR6's
3) Roomy toe box, probably best for guys that run a D-2E width
4) Snug fit around the ankles and extension of sole on lateral edges gives a high degree of stability and confidence in the shoe
5) Cushioning with boost material extends into the midsole and you can feel it hopping around, very comfortable. Not pillowy soft but more like a firm mattress.

Will be taking them out on the court later this week and looking forward to see how they perform and how my back feels afterward. That's always the acid test. If my back is sore after a couple hours then its not cushioned and supportive enough.
 
why ? does it run big ? I acutally have wide front foot . that is why I thought this shoe might be good option
I wear braces or double socks and it takes those, very roomy forefoot, so much that when I cinch them I get a ripple across the forefoot top. Think the barricades were/are better fit for narrow feet.
 
I wear braces or double socks and it takes those, very roomy forefoot, so much that when I cinch them I get a ripple across the forefoot top. Think the barricades were/are better fit for narrow feet.
why ? does it run big ? I acutally have wide front foot . that is why I thought this shoe might be good option
Beautiful shoe for my foot. I have a wide foot and use orthotics insoles. I can't say enough really. So comfortable on day 1. I was deciding between these and 2E New Balance Lav shoe.
 
It was at Pete Carlson's Tennis and Golf shop in Palm Desert. Guess they were having a sale and I didn't even notice. Also got some golf balls at a great price too.
Almost feel like I should go back and get a second pair lol.
why are you playing golf balls ? arent' they too heavy on the tennis court ?
 
Well, I had to order some Adidas gear for work (employer is picking up the tab), so I decided to pull the trigger on a pair of Solecourt Boosts. Figured since I can’t get my beloved Court FF’s in my size anymore, and who knows what the Court FF2 will be like, so why not? Decided also to size down a half size. I have narrow to medium feet, so hopefully that was the right call. We’ll see.
 
I wear US10 and at widest my narrow foot is 90mm underneath, 3.5 inches, the solecourt is 115/120mm underneath on the herringbone sole, and 110 measuring on top and 100inside, but it is a very high roomy forefoot so it spreads out and can accomodate more bulk, so I think it is the amount of fabric and height that give it this openness
 
Finished playing 3.5 hrs of tennis on the hard courts. 2hrs of Live Ball and 1.5 hrs mixed dubs.
Shoes played really nice. Super stable. Great push off when I needed to run. Enough cushioning that my back only gave me modest grief at the end. Usually 3.5 hrs on hard courts has me icing my back.

My foot did start to move around near the end causing some near blisters on my big toes but I think that was related to break in. I’ll be lacing tighter next time now that the upper has broken in a bit.

While they are not a super light shoe, they do rebound energy back from the boost so it makes them feel peppier. And they feel rock solid like adidas really went all in quality wise.
 
So now I am Seriously confused............ I asked TW sales agent and they said this shoe runs True to size and I should buy same size as my usual size and not buy 1/2 size down................... What should I do ????????
 
So now I am Seriously confused............ I asked TW sales agent and they said this shoe runs True to size and I should buy same size as my usual size and not buy 1/2 size down................... What should I do ????????
I would buy your normal size. I tried the shoe on and it was wide, too wide for me, but it wasn't long in my opinion. I know you said you had a wider foot, I think this should be a good shoe for you in your normal size. I liked the shoe other than the width.
 
The shoe fits true to length. I would not go smaller size. Three things are different from the Barricade 2018 (best Barricade IMO)
1) SC is wider up front. Even though it is, it is stable and my foot is not moving inside the shoe
2) higher arch. I could feel it more than on the Barricades. Could be the break-in period, though, I never had those challenges with my Barricades. I say challenges because it felt like I was getting a blister/irritation in the arch area
3) much softer/comfortable. Almost too soft and comfortable for a tennis shoe. While I am completely confident on the court with my Barricades -- sliding and cutting corners, I feel almost "scared" to do that with the SC, afraid I may twist my ankle.
 
much softer/comfortable. Almost too soft and comfortable for a tennis shoe. While I am completely confident on the court with my Barricades -- sliding and cutting corners, I feel almost "scared" to do that with the SC, afraid I may twist my ankle.
I never played Barricades. Too narrow. But I'd say the sole court is more stable by far than my Babolat SFX3 and similar if not better than the Asics GR6. I find top end adidas tend to be very stable platforms moreso than any other manufacturer. I'm glad that's been toned down a little in the SoleCourt as I prefer a softer shoe.

But I wouldn't worry about twisting your ankle with the outrigger in the outside of the sole. It would be pretty hard to go over on that thing.

Just played my second match of tennis in the Solecourts and with my usual tennis socks on and the laces tightened up a bit, they played fantastic. No moving around, rock solid stability, Good traction, great bounce and shock absorption.

I think its the high level adidas for the wide foot crowd.
 
with the outrigger in the outside of the sole. It would be pretty hard to go over on that thing.
No moving around, rock solid stability,
.
Reckon the booty construction adds to that feeling/reality of stability? Certainly think the outrigger/flange a bit of an interesting innovation. Really good idea. Haven't caught on it at all and provides that extra edge.
 
The shoe fits true to length. I would not go smaller size. Three things are different from the Barricade 2018 (best Barricade IMO)
1) SC is wider up front. Even though it is, it is stable and my foot is not moving inside the shoe
2) higher arch. I could feel it more than on the Barricades. Could be the break-in period, though, I never had those challenges with my Barricades. I say challenges because it felt like I was getting a blister/irritation in the arch area
3) much softer/comfortable. Almost too soft and comfortable for a tennis shoe. While I am completely confident on the court with my Barricades -- sliding and cutting corners, I feel almost "scared" to do that with the SC, afraid I may twist my ankle.
This makes no sense. then how does Tsitsipas move so aggressively on the court so fast and violently if it is not so stable or confident on court ????????
 
This makes no sense. then how does Tsitsipas move so aggressively on the court so fast and violently if it is not so stable or confident on court ????????
Maybe it's like Pro's racquets i.e. custom models. Roger has custom Vapor X. I was sure it was not the same model as the one we can buy in every shop. This shoe is so uncomfortable and doesn't perform as well as some other models. Maybe it's the same here. Personally I don't always trust in what pro are wearing. I prefer some official reviews of the shoe such as Tennis Warehouse video reviews or read some customer comments and obviously try the shoe just to know the fit and maybe playtest the shoe if it fits well.

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Women's review of the shoe from Tennis Warehouse. Very interesting cause there are some similarities between men's and women's review of this shoe :)



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Women's review of the shoe from Tennis Warehouse. Very interesting cause there are some similarities between men's and women's review of this shoe :)



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I noticed that one of the men's reviewers even complained that there was not enough forefoot cushioning. This tells me it's nothing like the Crazylight Boost because the CLB has more forefoot cushioning than just about anything. It's probably more like the Tennis Energy Boost that came before it. I tried the Tennis Energy Boost a while back and ended up using the Comfort Guarantee to return it. It was one of the most uncomfortable tennis shoes I ever tried.
 
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J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Both women and mens TW review was not so positive. I found it odd that some of them even preferred Uber3’s which are not so performance wise like Uber2’s.
I tell ya, walking around in stores and stuff the 3 feels like a non performance shoe, but I have played matches in them and had no issues.

J
 

DJTaurus

Professional
I tell ya, walking around in stores and stuff the 3 feels like a non performance shoe, but I have played matches in them and had no issues.

J
They are still good shoes. But they feel too flat, and too Wide. Cushioning and lock down is top notch. Also rebound and acceleration is good. But i don’t have the precision of 2’s on stop n go/changing direction and also they feel less connected to the ground. They don’t feel heavy but they give you a feel like you are wearing boots. With Vapor X i feel like i am doing ballet like with Uber 2 and Speed Solution 2.
 
I noticed that one of the men's reviewers even complained that there was not enough forefoot cushioning. This tells me it's nothing like the Crazylight Boost because the CLB has more forefoot cushioning than just about anything. It's probably more like the Tennis Energy Boost that came before it. I tried the Tennis Energy Boost a while back and ended up using the Comfort Guarantee to return it. It was one of the most uncomfortable tennis shoes I ever tried.
Depends on what you are coming from. From an Asics, the Solecourt Boost has far more forefoot cushioning. Its not as nice as the Babolat SFX3 but few shoes are as cushy as that shoe. But it's definitely a comfortable show for me and my wide foot moderate arch foot. Not noticing any of the issues the playtesters mentioned. Fits like a glove with great traction and stability.

I will say I've been playing them with out my usual custom insole and once I get home from the desert I will put that in as I tend to get metatarsal discomfort if my transverse arch isn't supported. But I get that issue with every shoe I use on hardcourts.
 
Depends on what you are coming from. From an Asics, the Solecourt Boost has far more forefoot cushioning. Its not as nice as the Babolat SFX3 but few shoes are as cushy as that shoe. But it's definitely a comfortable show for me and my wide foot moderate arch foot. Not noticing any of the issues the playtesters mentioned. Fits like a glove with great traction and stability.

I will say I've been playing them with out my usual custom insole and once I get home from the desert I will put that in as I tend to get metatarsal discomfort if my transverse arch isn't supported. But I get that issue with every shoe I use on hardcourts.
Maybe you're right, even though at least one TW reviewer would probably disagree. I'll admit that I have a negative bias toward any shoe from Adidas that resembles the Tennis Energy Boost because for me that was one of the worst tennis shoes I can remember. It's interesting too that I'm a big fan of Boost at the same time. One thing I already know from looking at the shoe is that Adidas did not use nearly as much Boost as they do in the CLB and other basketball shoes. You can say that they do that for performance reasons, but I'm also guessing they are limited on how much Boost they can put in tennis shoes because of how Adidas allocates Boost. They obviously make more money on basketball shoes, so they have more flexibility on those to use more Boost.
 
This has been discussed many times: there are no problems with Adidas putting as much Boost in their tennis shoes as in any other (including CLB), if they thought it necessary. I don't understand why that idea keeps resurfacing. The put huge amount of Boost in their casual shoes with price points well below SCB.

:cool:
I don't work for Adidas, so I don't know the answer, but I remember a reliable poster in the past said he knew someone at operations for Adidas who said that Adidas allocates a certain amount of Boost to each business unit. There is a business unit for running shoes, another one for basketball shoes, another for tennis shoes, etc. BASF only produces a limited amount of Boost, so that's why they have to allocate. It's safe to assume that running and basketball shoes are top priority. As for casual shoes, I know they sell boatloads of classic shoes with no Boost (ie. Sambas, Superstars, Stan Smiths, etc.), so maybe having a few models with lots of Boost doesn't push the limits of their allocation. How much they allocated for tennis and how it affects their shoe design is anyone's guess unless they work for Adidas.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
I don't work for Adidas, so I don't know the answer, but I remember a reliable poster in the past said he knew someone at operations for Adidas who said that Adidas allocates a certain amount of Boost to each business unit. There is a business unit for running shoes, another one for basketball shoes, another for tennis shoes, etc. BASF only produces a limited amount of Boost, so that's why they have to allocate. It's safe to assume that running and basketball shoes are top priority. As for casual shoes, I know they sell boatloads of classic shoes with no Boost (ie. Sambas, Superstars, Stan Smiths, etc.), so maybe having a few models with lots of Boost doesn't push the limits of their allocation. How much they allocated for tennis and how it affects their shoe design is anyone's guess unless they work for Adidas.
Yes, but if you say that you don't know why speculate like that?

Fact is, Adidas uses loads of the stuff in a (much) lower priced shoes, so it doesn't make sense.

The somewhat perplexing part is that I personally had that exchange with you at least two other times, and nothing seems to change. I also remember that at the second exchange which happened some time after the first, it was cleared that that poster was talking about the initial runs of Boost, when the stuff might have been in more limited supply. Really, the market is swamped with shoes with generous amounts of Boost in them which sell for like half the price of SCB. Considering that Adidas seems to not view the tennis market like an afterthought like some other companies do, I hold it for highly unlikely that they would hurt their top of the line shoe, because they wanted to save on the stuff that is basically in all their lines.

BTW, the Stan Smiths, Superstars and the Sambas are also available with Boost, if one prefers that, so I don't think that you are correct on that either. I have the Smiths with Boost in my shoe closet.

:cool:
 
Yes, but if you say that you don't know why speculate like that?

Fact is, Adidas uses loads of the stuff in a (much) lower priced shoes, so it doesn't make sense.

The somewhat perplexing part is that I personally had that exchange with you at least two other times, and nothing seems to change. I also remember that at the second exchange which happened some time after the first, it was cleared that that poster was talking about the initial runs of Boost, when the stuff might have been in more limited supply. Really, the market is swamped with shoes with generous amounts of Boost in them which sell for like half the price of SCB. Considering that Adidas seems to not view the tennis market like an afterthought like some other companies do, I hold it for highly unlikely that they would hurt their top of the line shoe, because they wanted to save on the stuff that is basically in all their lines.

BTW, the Stan Smiths, Superstars and the Sambas are also available with Boost, if one prefers that, so I don't think that you are correct on that either. I have the Smiths with Boost in my shoe closet.

:cool:
Since neither of us work for Adidas, we are only speculating. You're right about that. The main issue seems to be why Adidas doesn't put more Boost into their tennis shoes. Personally, I wish they did. If they put out a tennis version of the CLB (perhaps with a more durable outsole), I think they would sell a lot of them. It has lots of cushioning, it's comfortable, it looks great, and I think most tennis players would love it. It might not be the best choice for a touring pro, but most of us are far from being in that category.
 
Don't get me wrong: currently I have 6 pairs of shoes with Boost (and between me and my wife a total of ten), including the CLB and I love them all. I think that Adidas is working to satisfy the broadest potential client base, and they have to see what works, but they also have to satisfy their pros, and too much cushioning would come at the expense mostly on weight and increased reaction time, which would be extremely undesirable. I use my CLB on RA and it is the best cushioning I have used, but there are other opinions, including a poster who blamed the height of the shoe for a sprained ankle, so it is not all straightforward putting as much Boost as possible and see what happens.

I am yet to buy a SCB, but as soon as I do I will make a full comparison.

:cool:
When I look at Adidas's line of shoes, they either have pro performance shoes or takedowns of pro shoes at the lower price points. They really don't have anything that compares to a Babolat SFX, Prince T22, or K-Swiss Hypercourt Express. Those aren't the types of shoes that pros would grab first, but a lot of lesser players like them. If I remember correctly, the poster who criticized the height of the CLB didn't actually sprain his ankle, he just said it could cause sprained ankles, which is his opinion.
 
In your opinion are these the best cushioned tennis shoes out there?
Well i can't admit to trying every shoe out there as I'm limited to wide fits only due to my 2E feet. But compared to anything from New Balance, Asics GR and Adidas Ubersonic and Solecourt, then yes the SFX3's are plusher. I also briefly tried on the KSwiss Hypercourt but they felt like cheap New Balance shoes, so I immediately removed them.

To me the SFX3 feel like the Hoka One One's of tennis shoes. Light uppers with substantial cushioning.
 
Does anyone know the heel-toe drop of these and how do they compare to the Barricade Boost 2018 or older?I'm asking cause Boost was the shoe that made a difference with my plantar fasciitis and casual achilles tendon stiffness.
 
The shoe fits true to length. I would not go smaller size. Three things are different from the Barricade 2018 (best Barricade IMO)
1) SC is wider up front. Even though it is, it is stable and my foot is not moving inside the shoe
2) higher arch. I could feel it more than on the Barricades. Could be the break-in period, though, I never had those challenges with my Barricades. I say challenges because it felt like I was getting a blister/irritation in the arch area
3) much softer/comfortable. Almost too soft and comfortable for a tennis shoe. While I am completely confident on the court with my Barricades -- sliding and cutting corners, I feel almost "scared" to do that with the SC, afraid I may twist my ankle.
I went 1/2 size smaller in length and it fits great. I would recommend 1/2 size smaller due to wideness of forefront of the shoe
 
Maybe you're right, even though at least one TW reviewer would probably disagree. I'll admit that I have a negative bias toward any shoe from Adidas that resembles the Tennis Energy Boost because for me that was one of the worst tennis shoes I can remember. It's interesting too that I'm a big fan of Boost at the same time. One thing I already know from looking at the shoe is that Adidas did not use nearly as much Boost as they do in the CLB and other basketball shoes. You can say that they do that for performance reasons, but I'm also guessing they are limited on how much Boost they can put in tennis shoes because of how Adidas allocates Boost. They obviously make more money on basketball shoes, so they have more flexibility on those to use more Boost.
it is not possible to be fan of the boost and also think it is the worst shoe of all time
 
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