Adjusting as you get older (50+)?

LoanStar

New User
I know the thread "Seniors lounge (over 50) come on in" exists but I wanted to start this thread to find out how other forum members have adapted as they've become older in order to continue playing, stay competitive, get fulfillment from the game, etc.. Areas to consider and comment on...

-Equipment changes
-Stroke technique/mechanics
-Match play strategy and tactics
-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices
-Off-court training and injury prevention
-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Do some exercise everyday. Hit that hot shower. Jacuzzi would probably help also.
Lot of body weight deadlifts, squats and lunges. Add small weights as you progress. Keep extra weight off, burn calories. Shadow swings everyday to keep upper back loose
 

3loudboys

Semi-Pro
I’m 48 this year so close enough to chime in - certainly have days where feel closer to 55. Also got a chronic disc injury in my lower back so daily stretching and core work have helped enormously as I’ve got older but helpful for players of all ages. I hit 3 times a week and do 1 non racket court fitness session with a former county athlete. The hitting sessions have come down from 2 and half hours to 1 and a half per session.

Have found my joints are feeling it a lot more so surface choice is key for me. Will play the acrylic once a week and clay twice. My knees and back really feel the hard courts the day after.

Racket has come down in weight from the old rad tours to a Prince TT100P as swing speed has slowed. Much prefer a heavier flexy stick but the old bones needed a leg up from lighter weight equipment.

Haven’t yet changed my game style from counterpuncher as groundies are solid and I hit with good TS. Getting to net quicker these days if the opportunity arises though and that does help shorten the points. Have practised serve a lot more and the kicker and slider are so much better. The plan was to create shorter balls on return and get a few cheap put aways. It’s a WIP.


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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
You don't have to adjust ... your legs will do it for you.

-Equipment changes

ball machine aimed right at you

-Stroke technique/mechanics

spend your time learning a new stroke ... won't help your game but hard to injure yourself during those 1000s of hours

-Match play strategy and tactics

beat the ball machine every session ... no witnesses

-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices

play as much as you want ... you aren't fast enough to run far enough to wear yourself out

-Off-court training and injury prevention

Whataburger

-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)

still the best 2 hours ... uh ... 1 hour of the day
 

3loudboys

Semi-Pro
You don't have to adjust ... your legs will do it for you.

-Equipment changes

ball machine aimed right at you

-Stroke technique/mechanics

spend your time learning a new stroke ... won't help your game but hard to injure yourself during those 1000s of hours

-Match play strategy and tactics

beat the ball machine every session ... no witnesses

-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices

play as much as you want ... you aren't fast enough to run far enough to wear yourself out

-Off-court training and injury prevention

Whataburger

-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)

still the best 2 hours ... uh ... 1 hour of the day
Like the idea of a ball machine to fine tune strokes and work out.


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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Like the idea of a ball machine to fine tune strokes and work out.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I got the ball machine around 57 ... perfect timing. I have been extremely lucky with virtually no injuries until 57 ... and not a workout/gym guy. I was playing some of my best singles at 55 ... flying around the court. OK ... 55 year old version of fast 8-B ... got to most drop shots. TE hit at 57, and then hamstring injuries after that. I am a singles player to my core ... hard for me to think doubles only. I think if I played doubles three times a week ... and legs held up post hamstring injury recovery ... probably could still play decent 4.5 doubles. I never lost my volley skills ... so just a matter of how well legs held up.

So ball machine ... never gets boring for me. Part of it is my nature ... I enjoyed driving range practice in golf also. I don't use it for aerobic ... just straight feed (no oscillation) to groove strokes. It was priceless learning a bucket list :-D 2hbh.

I haven't gone back to playing singles against my friends since hamstring injuries ... too much risk competition thing kicked in and I go full sprint (that is how I got 2nd hamstring injury on 2nd leg). Will start playing them again soon (Spring), but will play points instead of sets to keep it casual. I played points against a rookie all summer and fall last year, and legs held up fine because he did most of the running. :p I find myself trying to be first strike now, which other than past s&v days goes against the way I have always played (low UE, willing to grind from baseline).

To @LoanStar ... it's all a series of concessions to me. When my singles tournaments were over at 30s ... those next two decades of club doubles and USTA was a concession. Still hitting a tennis ball ... however. (y)
 

user92626

Legend
Play your age group ... if any left.
Do you or anyone find "play your age group" is difficult to come by?

My wife often makes fun of me for playing with 60s, 70s years old. (70s is exaggerated cuz there's like only one) but the guys my age (40s) don't stay long at the court, picky with who to play
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
I started at 40 in good shape but with little tennis experience. Picked it up quickly and with fitness was able to make matches of everything. Of course, the last few years with injuries and just plain getting older, fitness dropped but I took the time out to improve my technique finally. So now I have better strokes, but too many times I don't get to use them as I watch the ball zipping by across the court cuz I am not there. Annoying, to be honest.

Some of the changes I have made really are just natural maturity in the sport as well. So things like using a lot more control and placement over power, or being more even tempered in pionts come with time and more confidence anyway, but definitely also part of aging.

I have changed my workout and match schedules. I used to work out daily for at least an hour, then play about 3 hours of tennis 4 or 5 times per week as well. Now I try to get in a few practices, and maybe a match or two if the body feels good enough.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Do you or anyone find "play your age group" is difficult to come by?

My wife often makes fun of me for playing with 60s, 70s years old. (70s is exaggerated cuz there's like only one) but the guys my age (40s) don't stay long at the court, picky with who to play
My group of friends is to hit with is narrow now for a couple of reasons. Many friends quit tennis because of backs, knees ... quit tennis club tennis 8 years ago ... have not played USTA for several years. I am down to a couple of us from past club and USTA teams that still prefer singles. Doubles was easy at the club, because it's what most played ... but hard to get 4 together for doubles now. I am fine with ball machine and some singles play with my small group. Every now and then we will play doubles, but this group all prefers singles no matter our age. We see the 70 year old doubles league at the public tennis center when we play ...we know our singles days are numbered. I guess I like senior doubles more than the ball machine ... but it's close. 8-B
 

user92626

Legend
Go to courts on weekdays and you find lots of old farts and a few younger players.
My group of friends is to hit with is narrow now for a couple of reasons. Many friends quit tennis because of backs, knees ... quit tennis club tennis 8 years ago ... have not played USTA for several years. I am down to a couple of us from past club and USTA teams that still prefer singles. Doubles was easy at the club, because it's what most played ... but hard to get 4 together for doubles now. I am fine with ball machine and some singles play with my small group. Every now and then we will play doubles, but this group all prefers singles no matter our age. We see the 70 year old doubles league at the public tennis center when we play ...we know our singles days are numbered. I guess I like senior doubles more than the ball machine ... but it's close. 8-B
The older folks around me play dubs only. Only two people mix in singles here and there. The younger guys (40ish) are fewer and also prefer dubs. They avoid singles, I think, because they can't handle losses. The younger guys play only with those that they think are near their level. This can narrow the field down to fewer players.

So, most of the better guys, young guys, won't stick around when they see they can't assemble decent 4 players for a "serious game" (their perception) but strangely they won't go with my approach of playing with anyone and give them handicaps (I can assemble teams).

In the end too many different ideas of what tennis is for me to handle so I just do whatever, get whatever I can! I don't have a disciplined way that I play hard or casual all the time, or with a particular level. I tend to look for matched attitudes and spirits. The rest can be tweak, accommodated. Not age group, not level group. Isn't that interesting?
 

atatu

Hall of Fame
I'm giving serious consideration to giving up my Pure Aero and trying an oversize frame, if you look on youtube at any of the 65's national championship doubles matches they are all using Asics or Gamma oversized frames, I'm just not sure if I can do it yet (I'm 56).
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
Primary determinants of how your body's going to hold up playing tennis as you age:

1. Genetics: Single biggest issue and you can't control it. Some folks can just bang around all the time for years and years and just never get hurt. Their bodies are better suited for activity.
2. How much tennis you've played: How much wear and tear you've put on your body over the years. (Can't change that now... what's done is done.)
3. Court surface: If possible - and I realize it's not always possible - stick to soft surfaces. Clay, for example, is much easier on your body relative to hard courts. Yeah, you see guys like McEnroe playing on quasi-hard surfaces for those Pro Shares events but he plays the vast majority of his tennis on har tru, which is one of the main reasons he's still out there competing so well at 60.
4. Weight: If you're heavy, carrying that extra weight around is going to take a toll on your body.
5. Hitting vs. Match Play: Matches are harder on your body than hitting because you're doing more hard starting and stopping. As you age, probably a good idea to hit/drill more and play fewer matches. You can get the same endurance benefits from hitting/drilling by just taking fewer breaks.
6. Off-court exercise: Has to help but I don't know much about this

I'm sure there are other issues but those are the big ones (I think).
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Primary determinants of how your body's going to hold up playing tennis as you age:

1. Genetics: Single biggest issue and you can't control it. Some folks can just bang around all the time for years and years and just never get hurt. Their bodies are better suited for activity.
2. How much tennis you've played: How much wear and tear you've put on your body over the years. (Can't change that now... what's done is done.)
3. Court surface: If possible - and I realize it's not always possible - stick to soft surfaces. Clay, for example, is much easier on your body relative to hard courts. Yeah, you see guys like McEnroe playing on quasi-hard surfaces for those Pro Shares events but he plays the vast majority of his tennis on har tru, which is one of the main reasons he's still out there competing so well at 60.
4. Weight: If you're heavy, carrying that extra weight around is going to take a toll on your body.
5. Hitting vs. Match Play: Matches are harder on your body than hitting because you're doing more hard starting and stopping. As you age, probably a good idea to hit/drill more and play fewer matches. You can get the same endurance benefits from hitting/drilling by just taking fewer breaks.
6. Off-court exercise: Has to help but I don't know much about this

I'm sure there are other issues but those are the big ones (I think).
All of my hours on hard court ... I have been very lucky lasting this long with the joints. I logged some crazy court hours before I hit 30. Also ... it was the kind of hour where I ran a lot ... long matches ... long points. Those first strike big serve guys are lucky.

I have been around a lot of guys who had knee replacements, so I have heard some of their discussions. It seems part knee issues can be luck of the draw on straight legs. Supposedly bow legged, or knock kneed (or even more minor degrees of it) can wear the outer or inner edge more. Not a doc ... just what I have heard. Nothing one can do about it. Also interesting is several of my friends that had knee replacements were the guys that never were overweight ... I mean ever. I had periods of being 20+ lbs heavy ... which is a lot for 5' 7" average build. I think part of what must have saved my knees is basically playing very little singles when my weight was up.
 
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I have made some adjustments:​
Moved to a more powerful and larger frame (Pure Drive Tour)​
Play more on clay when I can​
Gave up USTA, now play my age group mostly except when I hit with my 4.5 son​
Go to Yoga class twice a week​
Take more time off between hard matches​
Avoid/refuse to play with partners that are always complaining and are not fun​
Go for less first serves, concentrate on placement and a good serve percentage​
serve and volley less in singles​
play more doubles​
enjoy playing in groups where the level has dropped to 3.5 just for fun​
Many of my old buddies have given it up because of injuries.​
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
Primary determinants of how your body's going to hold up playing tennis as you age:

1. Genetics: Single biggest issue and you can't control it. Some folks can just bang around all the time for years and years and just never get hurt. Their bodies are better suited for activity.
2. How much tennis you've played: How much wear and tear you've put on your body over the years. (Can't change that now... what's done is done.)
3. Court surface: If possible - and I realize it's not always possible - stick to soft surfaces. Clay, for example, is much easier on your body relative to hard courts. Yeah, you see guys like McEnroe playing on quasi-hard surfaces for those Pro Shares events but he plays the vast majority of his tennis on har tru, which is one of the main reasons he's still out there competing so well at 60.
4. Weight: If you're heavy, carrying that extra weight around is going to take a toll on your body.
5. Hitting vs. Match Play: Matches are harder on your body than hitting because you're doing more hard starting and stopping. As you age, probably a good idea to hit/drill more and play fewer matches. You can get the same endurance benefits from hitting/drilling by just taking fewer breaks.
6. Off-court exercise: Has to help but I don't know much about this

I'm sure there are other issues but those are the big ones (I think).
1. -
2. -
3. +
4. +
5. //
6. +

Life is good.

:giggle:
 

LoanStar

New User
I’m 48 this year so close enough to chime in - certainly have days where feel closer to 55. Also got a chronic disc injury in my lower back so daily stretching and core work have helped enormously as I’ve got older but helpful for players of all ages. I hit 3 times a week and do 1 non racket court fitness session with a former county athlete. The hitting sessions have come down from 2 and half hours to 1 and a half per session.

Have found my joints are feeling it a lot more so surface choice is key for me. Will play the acrylic once a week and clay twice. My knees and back really feel the hard courts the day after.

Racket has come down in weight from the old rad tours to a Prince TT100P as swing speed has slowed. Much prefer a heavier flexy stick but the old bones needed a leg up from lighter weight equipment.

Haven’t yet changed my game style from counterpuncher as groundies are solid and I hit with good TS. Getting to net quicker these days if the opportunity arises though and that does help shorten the points. Have practised serve a lot more and the kicker and slider are so much better. The plan was to create shorter balls on return and get a few cheap put aways. It’s a WIP.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Can you elaborate on the non-racquet court fitness session?
 

LoanStar

New User
I started at 40 in good shape but with little tennis experience. Picked it up quickly and with fitness was able to make matches of everything. Of course, the last few years with injuries and just plain getting older, fitness dropped but I took the time out to improve my technique finally. So now I have better strokes, but too many times I don't get to use them as I watch the ball zipping by across the court cuz I am not there. Annoying, to be honest.

Some of the changes I have made really are just natural maturity in the sport as well. So things like using a lot more control and placement over power, or being more even tempered in pionts come with time and more confidence anyway, but definitely also part of aging.

I have changed my workout and match schedules. I used to work out daily for at least an hour, then play about 3 hours of tennis 4 or 5 times per week as well. Now I try to get in a few practices, and maybe a match or two if the body feels good enough.
What are you doing for off court workouts?
 

LoanStar

New User
I have made some adjustments:​
Moved to a more powerful and larger frame (Pure Drive Tour)​
Play more on clay when I can​
Gave up USTA, now play my age group mostly except when I hit with my 4.5 son​
Go to Yoga class twice a week​
Take more time off between hard matches​
Avoid/refuse to play with partners that are always complaining and are not fun​
Go for less first serves, concentrate on placement and a good serve percentage​
serve and volley less in singles​
play more doubles​
enjoy playing in groups where the level has dropped to 3.5 just for fun​
Many of my old buddies have given it up because of injuries.​
Agree with your remark about avoiding complainers. Same with user92626’s comment about looking for matched attitudes and spirits.

For me tennis is about fitness, fun, play and mental therapy. Grateful every time I step on the court.
 

Vanhalen

Professional
Ha! I am the guy who started the “Seniors Lounge”. I turn 64 next week. Honestly I really had no issues playing USTA 4.0 until age 62. Beating 25 year old guys and watching them walk to their car with their head down, wondering WTH just happened. A few ankle tendon issues stopped me for 6 months. Working my way back.

I love this game. I am like a 16 year old kid mentality and want to play every day! But the body does need recovery time even though the mind wants to be out there. A couple of Advil’s and a glass of Cabernet along with soaking in a hot bath with epsom salt helps.

I played with a T2000, Prince Woody, ProStaff, Pro Kennex Silver and Black Ace, Wilson Advantage, Kramer’s.. Still have them. Also played in a tournament in 1974? With my wooden Jack Kramer. I smacked it on the court in anger after a missed shot and the head snapped. I had no other frames. My sister who was watching the match at Ohio State stadium courts gave me her Chris Evert wooden frame. I won the match with it and kept it for the rest of the year.

Tennis has brought me fantastic memories and friends. You should see the senior guys in Florida. There are private communities on every corner filled with super competitive guys playing matches every single day. Seriously, these guys are beyond serious. It’s like being on a mini tour. These guys have big binders, indexed with players names whom they have played. Full of notes on strategy, weakness, strengths. I saw a binder and one of the tabs had my name!!!! I asked the guy if I could take a look at the notes on me. He grabbed it and I thought he was going to freaking hit me!

Now I use a MTM method modern ATP swing vs my old classic swing. I have gone from a heavy Pro Staff, to an APD, to a PD Lite, to a Burn Team.

Enjoy it while you can boys. My ankles are taped, my knees are taped and I went an arm sleeve. But I will fight until the bitter end. When I die, I hope it’s on a tennis court.
 

3loudboys

Semi-Pro
Can you elaborate on the non-racquet court fitness session?
Sure - the non racket sessions vary but they include elements of the following exercises. They are in no particular order apart from the warmup as my friend who organises it varies each week to keep it fresh.

- start with laps around the court jogging and then into various steps, for example sides and crossovers. Not to many as it’s the initial warmup.

- line sprints, start at one outside tram and sprint to each line in front and back to the tram you start on. Go to each line further out consecutively.

- active shadow swings - movement across the full width of the court using running and side steps/cross overs to hit a fh or bh incorporating a shuffle step. Then back the other way.

- Shuttle runs - to the net and back. Also timed runs the full length of court and back.

- ladder drills on fast footwork. Ups and downs and ins and outs.

- more footwork drills using cones /empty ball cans. Encouraging large initial steps.

- some throw and catch ball drills. This can incorporate some running and fetching balls from angles around the court.

- the only racket work is a mini court sponge ball game. It’s fun but hard work. Play points where you can only hit forehands. Great for movement around the ball but you feel it quickly - certainly I do at my age.

That’s mostly everything we’ve done this year but I can top it up with new stuff along the way. Two of my sons who both play watched and liked it so much they asked to join in. Great for them as it is hard work but it’s fun and they look forward to it every week. They do take pleasure in letting the old man know he needs to get fitter!

More recently, my friend who organises it took my boys running one session. This incorporated fast sprints between markers followed by walking, and then jogging. I’m lucky at my club as it’s located across from a forest and a running club so there are very good well used running routes. I ducked this session as had an ankle niggle but will go again next time.

Hope that’s useful but if anything’s unclear just let me know.


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toth

Semi-Pro
You don't have to adjust ... your legs will do it for you.

-Equipment changes

ball machine aimed right at you

-Stroke technique/mechanics

spend your time learning a new stroke ... won't help your game but hard to injure yourself during those 1000s of hours

-Match play strategy and tactics

beat the ball machine every session ... no witnesses

-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices

play as much as you want ... you aren't fast enough to run far enough to wear yourself out

-Off-court training and injury prevention

Whataburger

-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)

still the best 2 hours ... uh ... 1 hour of the day
At what ages do usually the legs become weaker , longer rallies become more difficoult?
I am 48, averages kondition, i can wear longer rallies decent yet.
 

samarai

Semi-Pro
i play every other day. Play alot more doubles. Dont take things too seriously, just happy when i get a good workout without the pains associated with the workout.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
At what ages do usually the legs become weaker , longer rallies become more difficoult?
I am 48, averages kondition, i can wear longer rallies decent yet.
When you hit 50, you will start to muscle atrophy. You will see muscles becoming smaller in all parts of your body. So counteract this, you will have to do some muscle building excercises to maintain muscle mass
 
- Emphasis on injury-prevention vs performance-enhancement

- Know thyself: I can't play 5 days consecutively anymore

- Proper pre- and post-match stretching. Not coincidentally, the only workout I ever see this occurring is with the young'uns [20s and 30s] who are ex-collegiates.

- Being grateful for my time on the court [because it could all end in an instant]

- More consciencious of diet/hydration
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
At what ages do usually the legs become weaker , longer rallies become more difficoult?
I am 48, averages kondition, i can wear longer rallies decent yet.
Depends on individual. I have a 61 year old buddy that still moves better than most 30 year olds. But ... most of my 60+ year old tennis friends had to quit tennis. You lose speed and strength gradually. I still had good speed at 55. You decide to test your sprint one day out jogging, and there is no sprint. :eek: Leg strength starts showing up getting to drop shots, and overheads. I have had a rock solid overhead forever ... and couldn't figure out why I was not as solid anymore. Legs ... you need surprisingly strong legs for solid overheads.

In hindsight ... I would have just started body weight squats at 50. I never worked my legs ... never needed to.
 

3loudboys

Semi-Pro
Just restarted an old daily workout routine inspired by this thread. It’s hard not to throw yourself back into conditioning after reading so much relevant content from experienced posters/players.

Will be doing a half hour session daily until I feel the need to increase if at all. It’s not overly complicated but briefly it contains stretching and lunges, skipping, light weights, push ups, sit ups, shadow boxing and some balance exercises.

It felt great afterwards and hoping it makes an impact on the court.


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Oh man, I’m glad I found this thread, but reading this makes me feel old all of a sudden. I thought 50 was the new 40, not the new 70.

I suppose I’m lucky that at 51 I can still get around. My off court activities include soccer, skateboarding and snowboarding. (SoCal much?) I mostly just putter around the skatepark and encourage my 8 year-old daughter, but I just go back from snowboarding in Big Bear, which is basically a giant terrain park, so I kind of HAD to try those house-sizes tabletop jumps. In tennis I don’t have the opportunity to play much younger/stronger guys unfortunately, but in soccer, I can still keep up with the 20 and 30 year olds for the most part.

I went decades without playing tennis, and just getting back into it. Probably why my knees still work. I hit with and respect some of the retirees at the local courts - they are like human ball machines and cones all in one - but their many injuries make me realize I need to take better care of myself if I want to keep playing for a few more decades.

I need to swallow my pride and stop chasing down so many drop shots and wide balls. The effort is no big deal, but pounding isn’t worth it. Hard stops are a lot harder after 50. Also need cushier shoes! And play lighter on the feet. Balls not heels. I definitively move more thoughtfully.

Trying to modernize the strokes. The benefit of “effortless power” as I age is more about the effortless than the power. I don’t need to hit twice as hard, but if I can hit just as hard with half the effort, that’s a worthy savings. Plus, I’d say modern strokes (within reason) are more biomechanically sound.

Play less frequently. I can play hard 2 days in a row, but not 3. My heart, lungs, and muscles are fine, but oh my joints!

Must get back into Yoga/Pilates. I don’t stretch enough. I hadn’t thought about strength training/haven’t noticed muscle atrophy, but reading the posts here I will consider it.

Still playing with vintage style racquets (Prince Phantoms) but going to consider swallowing my pride and using something with a little easier power. If it’s good enough for Troy Lara and Chris Edwards, it should be good enough for me.


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Oh man, I’m glad I found this thread, but reading this makes me feel old all of a sudden. I thought 50 was the new 40, not the new 70.

I suppose I’m lucky that at 51 I can still get around. My off court activities include soccer, skateboarding and snowboarding. (SoCal much?) I mostly just putter around the skatepark and encourage my 8 year-old daughter, but I just go back from snowboarding in Big Bear, which is basically a giant terrain park, so I kind of HAD to try those house-sizes tabletop jumps. In tennis I don’t have the opportunity to play much younger/stronger guys unfortunately, but in soccer, I can still keep up with the 20 and 30 year olds for the most part.

I went decades without playing tennis, and just getting back into it. Probably why my knees still work. I hit with and respect some of the retirees at the local courts - they are like human ball machines and cones all in one - but their many injuries make me realize I need to take better care of myself if I want to keep playing for a few more decades.


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I need to take better care of myself if I want to keep playing for a few more decades.


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So to that end,

I need to swallow my pride and stop chasing down so many drop shots and wide balls. The effort is no big deal, but pounding isn’t worth it. Hard stops are a lot harder after 50. Also need cushier shoes! And play lighter on the feet. Balls not heels. I definitively move more thoughtfully.

Trying to modernize the strokes. The benefit of “effortless power” as I age is more about the effortless than the power. I don’t need to hit twice as hard, but if I can hit just as hard with half the effort, that’s a worthy savings. Plus, I’d say modern strokes (within reason) are more biomechanically sound.

Play less frequently. I can play hard 2 days in a row, but not 3. My heart, lungs, and muscles are fine, but oh my joints!

Must get back into Yoga/Pilates. I don’t stretch enough. I hadn’t thought about strength training/haven’t noticed muscle atrophy, but reading the posts here I will consider it.

Still playing with vintage style racquets (Prince Phantoms) but going to consider swallowing my pride and using something with a little easier power. If it’s good enough for Troy Lara and Chris Edwards, it should be good enough for me.


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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
good things before playing:

- foam roll hamstrings and calves
- rollerbar forearm and tricep
- resistance band to warm up shoulder
- lay on back over yoga ball
- dynamic stretches at court (I do these now instead of static stretches)

other stuff:

- replace crap insoles
- body weight squats, body weight roman curls, nordic curls, glute bridges with feet over yoga ball, reverse crunches on incline bench at home

I would put the foam rolling and rollerbar massage near the top for injury prevention/maintenance

edit: dynamic stretches before play also for injury prevention

ditch the jogging ... I bought a cheap 50lb single speed fat tire bike from Walmart for aerobic. Haven't used since hamstring injuries ... injuries healed ... it's time. :(
 
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if you stretch in correct ways and workout smartly, you can too still do this when you are over 50.
I really wonders when people are saying "Stretch" is good for you. There were research on stretching that concluded that runners who stretch are more likely to get injured. Research also says that stretching before activity reduces max power output, or something like that. Those are shockers for believers like me. It took a while for me to even accept those findings, but eventually I stopped stretching. And I found no reduction in motion range.
Yes even old timer, old pros told me to stretch to speed recovery. But I have not found that to work.
My take away is that it is important to have and do activities that allows you to use your full range of motion. Before activity do some dynamic stretch meaning use only the range that your muscle/strength can support. Work from low to high intensity but only if your body is ready for it.

Most important of all, one needs more strength than range of motion. If you have greater range of motion than strength then you can be in trouble. I observed that some dancer stretch themselves and exceeding their body structure allows and got hurt. Be careful. You only have one body.

Listen to your body.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I really wonders when people are saying "Stretch" is good for you. There were research on stretching that concluded that runners who stretch are more likely to get injured. Research also says that stretching before activity reduces max power output, or something like that. Those are shockers for believers like me. It took a while for me to even accept those findings, but eventually I stopped stretching. And I found no reduction in motion range.
Yes even old timer, old pros told me to stretch to speed recovery. But I have not found that to work.
My take away is that it is important to have and do activities that allows you to use your full range of motion. Before activity do some dynamic stretch meaning use only the range that your muscle/strength can support. Work from low to high intensity but only if your body is ready for it.

Most important of all, one needs more strength than range of motion. If you have greater range of motion than strength then you can be in trouble. I observed that some dancer stretch themselves and exceeding their body structure allows and got hurt. Be careful. You only have one body.

Listen to your body.
"If you have greater range of motion than strength then you can be in trouble."

Also if speed exceeds your muscle capacity. I am convinced that is why I had two hamstring injuries ... running down a sharp cc angle hitting the sideline, and a topspin lob. If I had just become as slow as most of my friends :p ... I would not have got hurt because I would not have even tried for them. The scary part is there is no way to know what your limit is until you are limping and cussing. Hamstrings should come with warning beeping.

fyi ... I have read several things that also makes me question static stretching. Things like tendons don't stretch, muscles are the length they are suppose to be and connected to bones based on those lengths. The best analogy I read is that a rubberband is of good quality because it is not brittle, and maintained it's elasticity. You wouldn't stretch a rubberband to make it better. I did not do one static stretch before any of my singles play last year, but did 5-10 minute static stretches every time. I also bagged the full sprint ... so not an apples to apples comparison. So unless something changes ... it will be 1) foam rolling 2) dynamic stretches 3) bag the full sprint ... say good shot more often. If this quits working ... say goodbye to singles. :cry:(n)
 
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TnsGuru

Professional
If you haven't developed a better sense of anticipation after playing for years you may have to improve this skill. Now that you can't depend on your speed as much, you have to learn shot selection patterns and tendencies of your opponent(s) and get in position sooner.

I was much faster as a younger player but middle age has taught me to stop running so much and save your energy. I used to watch good players who had very good anticipatory skills and they weren't even fast but they were in the right place at the right time.
 
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I really wonders when people are saying "Stretch" is good for you. There were research on stretching that concluded that runners who stretch are more likely to get injured. Research also says that stretching before activity reduces max power output, or something like that. Those are shockers for believers like me. It took a while for me to even accept those findings, but eventually I stopped stretching. And I found no reduction in motion range.
Yes even old timer, old pros told me to stretch to speed recovery. But I have not found that to work.
My take away is that it is important to have and do activities that allows you to use your full range of motion. Before activity do some dynamic stretch meaning use only the range that your muscle/strength can support. Work from low to high intensity but only if your body is ready for it.

Most important of all, one needs more strength than range of motion. If you have greater range of motion than strength then you can be in trouble. I observed that some dancer stretch themselves and exceeding their body structure allows and got hurt. Be careful. You only have one body.

Listen to your body.
*Static* stretching shortens muscle length. That's why I do dynamic stretching pre-match and static stretching post-match.
 
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