Adjusting as you get older (50+)?

One of the hardest things for me as a 48 YO 4.5 is that the ppl I play with bow out one by one w. “Surgery or no tennis injuries “ and everyone opts for quitting the game . I’m almost out ppl to play with. That and the fact that courts seem to be going away and becoming developments.
 

user92626

Legend
One of the hardest things for me as a 48 YO 4.5 is that the ppl I play with bow out one by one w. “Surgery or no tennis injuries “ and everyone opts for quitting the game . I’m almost out ppl to play with. That and the fact that courts seem to be going away and becoming developments.
You know that I posted about my similar problem on page 1?

It's quite sad.

The REAL PROBLEM is us (people like you and me). Our drive for this rec tennis is so much stronger than most other people. They are like park walkers while we're like bodybuilders at the gym. They can't and won't, and very much dislike to, match our tennis intensity.

If I horse around, play 1 or 2 crappy sets with random ppl who don't care, indifferent to results, errors, then leave, I will have plenty of company.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I really wonders when people are saying "Stretch" is good for you. There were research on stretching that concluded that runners who stretch are more likely to get injured. Research also says that stretching before activity reduces max power output, or something like that. Those are shockers for believers like me. It took a while for me to even accept those findings, but eventually I stopped stretching. And I found no reduction in motion range.
Yes even old timer, old pros told me to stretch to speed recovery. But I have not found that to work.
My take away is that it is important to have and do activities that allows you to use your full range of motion. Before activity do some dynamic stretch meaning use only the range that your muscle/strength can support. Work from low to high intensity but only if your body is ready for it.

Most important of all, one needs more strength than range of motion. If you have greater range of motion than strength then you can be in trouble. I observed that some dancer stretch themselves and exceeding their body structure allows and got hurt. Be careful. You only have one body.

Listen to your body.
you should listen to me at all times without a question. I am the man.

 

Curiosity

Professional
You know that I posted about my similar problem on page 1?

It's quite sad.

The REAL PROBLEM is us (people like you and me). Our drive for this rec tennis is so much stronger than most other people. They are like park walkers while we're like bodybuilders at the gym. They can't and won't, and very much dislike to, match our tennis intensity.

If I horse around, play 1 or 2 crappy sets with random ppl who don't care, indifferent to results, errors, then leave, I will have plenty of company.
I frankly play for exercise. I have hitting partners who are 30's and 40's, one in his 50's. We hit for exercise, then finish up with a set to keep ourselves honest. (I'm 67.) I only play to win in that final set, if at all. I only play with intensity against people I know well, or in club/inter-club events which are rare. It is true that the intensity must fade a bit with age. Grooving strokes and exercising, "alternate backhands and forehands, make me run a little," seem key to keeping it going.

I've found that it's essentially to build a network of players who actually like to hit as tune-ups. A club can help that, or referrals. One of my hitting partners had stuck with the routine for fifteen years. It's guys like that who will also drag you back onto the court after injury or illness. That friend did get a much better game for his trouble.

Melancholy note: One of my best hitting partners has long been my son. I'm east coast. He moved for work to Pasadena, and still plays at least five days a week. Yesterday he called me to say "I'm in the stands about to watch the Federer match at Indian Wells." He went with three friends, and later sent great photos. I felt an ugly wave of envy wash over me, but still watched the match on TC. Life is unfair. Next year it's IW or bust!
 
Love this thread. To sum it up:
-> Have fun. Enjoy everything moment!
-> Stay healthy. Be good to yourself, your body. Warm Up gently! to have fun!
-> Get motivated, find challenges so that you want to play more, play better, and to have more fun.

I think that was inspired by what Doc. Rickette said to his sons written by Steinbeck
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
good things before playing:

- foam roll hamstrings and calves
- rollerbar forearm and tricep
- resistance band to warm up shoulder
- lay on back over yoga ball
- dynamic stretches at court (I do these now instead of static stretches)
I'm assuming you have an after game ritual too. How much time do you play during an average session to justify this type of pre-game ritual? I usually do a couple of casual swings and then am ready. My body is rebeling though. Orthopedist said one of my knees hurt cos my hamstrings are too tight and thother cos one side of my hip has locked up, and has recommended me to some PT session. I've ignored that for now. :)
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I'm assuming you have an after game ritual too. How much time do you play during an average session to justify this type of pre-game ritual? I usually do a couple of casual swings and then am ready. My body is rebeling though. Orthopedist said one of my knees hurt cos my hamstrings are too tight and thother cos one side of my hip has locked up, and has recommended me to some PT session. I've ignored that for now. :)
In case you missed the BBP plot ... no significant injuries in 40+ years of tennis pre-57 ... then 1) tennis elbow 2) calf tear 3) right leg hamstring 4) left leg hamstring. I was the guy who did a 30 second static hamstring and calf stretch, then a 5 minute warm-up ... let's play. This crap isn't because I'm dedicated ... it's trying to keep tennis (particularly singles) going. 8-B This last summer, I avoided my friends I normally play singes against (usually 1.5-2.0 hours in the hot summer) because I don't think my hamstrings would have held up. Instead I hit against a new "Rookie" player ... and I was able to protect my legs by making sure he did most of the running. I will try to hit with my buddies again soon ... and see how the legs hold up. Probably play points instead of sets ... because you can't flip the competitive switch off on an old tournament player. With points ... or tiebreakers ... for me it makes it safer.

So yeah ... what a ritual for for an old guy just hitting with a rookie. The worse is the dynamic stretches because I have to do that at the court. If anyone is on the other court, they see me do all of these dynamic stretches, and must be thinking they are about to see a McEnroe geezer type ... only to see me. LOL!!!

After play ritual ... none. Probably should do static stretches, but the answer is NONE.

I have to say the 50 year olds here (and most of my old USTA retired teammates) with issues make me feel like Rocky. I mean ... going to 57-58 injury free, two original knees, crazy amount of hard court hours (really all I have ever played other than a little bit of time on green clay) without any form of workouts is a pretty good run. Caught up with me.

Speaking of caught up with me. I have basically done zero exercising other than body weight squats (even stopped that at some point), I felt like I was in pretty good shape at the end of fall, because played enough point play with the rookie where I never felt winded. WRONG ... hopped on my Wally World 50 lb bike (tractor) this morning, and NOT GOOD. I made my 1.5 mile loop ... and was breathing like crazy. Looks like I have a daily loop in my future for the next several weeks trying to get somewhere close to tennis ready. Oh ... and losing 5lbs + is not an option.

The beast ... any slight incline is a f***ing mountain. It used to be even worse ... I added a bigger front sprocket.

 
Here is a good quote:
Never take it for granted because soon enough it will be taken away. Time is tough. Every time you go out on the court be thankful. Be grateful. Believe me, I am. If you are lucky enough to be a tennis player you should recognize that it’s a privilege to be able to walk out on that court and play the game.”
― Brad Gilbert, Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis--Lessons from a Master
 

Wise one

Hall of Fame
Here is a good quote:
Never take it for granted because soon enough it will be taken away. Time is tough. Every time you go out on the court be thankful. Be grateful. Believe me, I am. If you are lucky enough to be a tennis player you should recognize that it’s a privilege to be able to walk out on that court and play the game.”
― Brad Gilbert, Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis--Lessons from a Master

Yep! In 1997, I tore my left acl. In 2007, I fractured my right knee (it healed quickly). After both of these, I was off the court for a short while. But in 2006, I tore my right shoulder rotator cuff. I was out for most of a year. Thyen in 2010, I suffered a severe back injury. Took me four years to come back. But I'm back!
 
Yep! In 1997, I tore my left acl. In 2007, I fractured my right knee (it healed quickly). After both of these, I was off the court for a short while. But in 2006, I tore my right shoulder rotator cuff. I was out for most of a year. Thyen in 2010, I suffered a severe back injury. Took me four years to come back. But I'm back!
I think your body is trying to tell you something...
 

LoanStar

New User
Love this thread. To sum it up:
-> Have fun. Enjoy everything moment!
-> Stay healthy. Be good to yourself, your body. Warm Up gently! to have fun!
-> Get motivated, find challenges so that you want to play more, play better, and to have more fun.

I think that was inspired by what Doc. Rickette said to his sons written by Steinbeck
Great summation tennisbike!

Reading thru all the posts here are the primary themes as I see them...

Injury prevention
-stretching (pre/post, dynamic)
-rest and recovery (sleep, foam rolling, yoga and not playing as many consecutive days)
-resistance training (bodyweight or light weights with high reps, pilates)
-keep excess weight off

Play and tactics
-quicker points
-more doubles
-don't chase down short/wide balls (injury prevention)
-play +/- a certain range of your age group
-if possible play on softer surfaces
-more hitting/drilling compared to actual match play (especially if still playing singles)

Attitude and expectations
-grateful to play
-enjoyment and fun
-avoid playing with folks that are negative or too uptight about the game

It seems one of the biggest challenges for those of us with a similar drive to play, compete (with a healthy attitude) and continue improving is finding partners or opponents of a similar ability and age that haven't "given up" or have become too dinged up physically.
 
It seems one of the biggest challenges for those of us with a similar drive to play, compete (with a healthy attitude) and continue improving is finding partners or opponents of a similar ability and age that haven't "given up" or have become too dinged up physically.
It becomes a lot easier if you remove age as a requirement.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
I still play about 5 times a week, but sometimes it’s just hitting and practicing. Once the weather breaks I will hit at least 5 days a week. Now that I’m retired many days I will hit with the ball machine in the morning then hit with a partner in the afternoon.

But I don’t have as many guys to play because so many have become injured and either can’t play or only play doubles now. I started playing in my 40’s and now am in my early 60’s but I really haven’t changed much as far as my time on the court or playing style.

Like Navigator said a lot of it is genetics and I think like Nav being of a smaller lighter build also helps a lot. I have always done weight training which I believe makes a huge difference in avoiding injuries. A couple years ago I noticed that I was getting winded easier than in the past when getting into long points. So being that I use a grinding style of play I started doing more aerobic style training and this has really helped my game.

Now I still do my strength training but also do CrossFit training which has really improved my fitness. One day I do weight training then I run 1 mile after, then next day I do CrossFit training and run a mile after. I do this style of training 6 days a week and has really improved my endurance. I can still play a tough 3 set match without a problem.

Being retired really helps I now get the rest and recovery time needed. I know some will think that this sounds like too much work but if you love playing as much as I do it’s worth it so I can stay on the court. My workouts with the 1 mile run only take around 40 minutes a day so it’s really not that tough.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Thx @LoanStar ... since your OP:

- first ride on bike of 2019
- hit first tennis balls of 2019
- started again :rolleyes: squats, glute bridges, roman curls, nordic curls (what happened to my plan of doing that all winter)
- and dog just got first walk of 2019 at the park

btw ... 2hbh against ball machine was like I never stopped ... hardly missed 8-B ... hitting a little after with the Rookie ... yeah, there it is ... late too often. Probably rookie's fault ... they can't hit a consistent ball. :-D
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
Did my CrossFit workout and 1 mile run which takes a total 35 minutes. Now I will take a nap and head to the courts for 4:00 court time. Then rinse and repeat tomorrow, it’s really rough being retired and not having to work.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Did my CrossFit workout and 1 mile run which takes a total 35 minutes. Now I will take a nap and head to the courts for 4:00 court time. Then rinse and repeat tomorrow, it’s really rough being retired and not having to work.
How do you do all that without legs being too tight (dangerous) for tennis?
 

Sardines

Professional
I know the thread "Seniors lounge (over 50) come on in" exists but I wanted to start this thread to find out how other forum members have adapted as they've become older in order to continue playing, stay competitive, get fulfillment from the game, etc.. Areas to consider and comment on...

-Equipment changes
-Stroke technique/mechanics
-Match play strategy and tactics
-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices
-Off-court training and injury prevention
-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)
In preparation of my 50th (48 now), I've already switched racquets to a lighter, more powerful racquet, from a K90 to a few different 95+ to SV98+ for now.
Compared to my 30s, the strokes are now more spin, mechanics still the same. Only the serve has changed a little bit from the deep hip lean into the court, to the more upright 'trophy' stance. Serve is now about placement and setup, rather than aces.
Warming up is longer with bands and dynamic stretching, warm downs including a bit of strength training and a lot of stretching.
Off court, I wake up to a 15 minute yoga stretching routine every day. For workouts, I do HIIT 3 times a week (1 heavy and 2 light) and aerobic/cardio of 30+ mins on road/stationary bike or stair climber or running on grass about 4 times a week, on top of hitting 4 times a week for about 2+ hours. I have 1 rest day a week, which is random to how I feel. but no more than 4 every 28 days. Sleep about 7.5 hrs a day, seems I'm need less sleep in one go so having a nap after lunch and before dinner is important.
I'm competitive at UTR12.2, and I find it's easier to do seasonal vs year round training, with build up about 1.5 months before the actual season, then change to light work outs with more court time.
I play for fun and enjoyment, as well as hitting something HARD to offload tension sometimes. I enjoy the artistry of playing now more vs the win only mentality. I don't do meds or supplements of any kind, watch my G.I. intake and eat healthy about 85% of the time.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
How do you do all that without legs being too tight (dangerous) for tennis?
I do some stretching also but not near as much as I should. I guess I’m lucky or my body is just used to it. There are times when my legs are feeling sore a lot I have to take a day it two off and let them recover.
 

toth

Semi-Pro
I am from Middle-Europe, i always play on clay.
Extrem grips, grinding style.
Do you have experience with that parameters?
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
How do you do all that without legs being too tight (dangerous) for tennis?
Other than the 1 mile run I do mix up my workouts. I did CrossFit yesterday which does hit the legs a lot but today I do weight training for upper body followed by 1 mile run. Then tomorrow back to CrossFit and 1 mile run so the legs get a little break.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Other than the 1 mile run I do mix up my workouts. I did CrossFit yesterday which does hit the legs a lot but today I do weight training for upper body followed by 1 mile run. Then tomorrow back to CrossFit and 1 mile run so the legs get a little break.
I have the same question always come up ... even with my simple body weight squats. I would like to do them several times a day ... every day... but what about the day I will play tennis? I had calf and hamstring injuries ... from too weak? too tight? Sure seems like squats before tennis is a "too tight" risk. How many body weight squats is too many? too few? every day? How many days?

Total mystery ... that is why I am doing so few. ;)
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
I have the same question always come up ... even with my simple body weight squats. I would like to do them several times a day ... every day... but what about the day I will play tennis? I had calf and hamstring injuries ... from too weak? too tight? Sure seems like squats before tennis is a "too tight" risk. How many body weight squats is too many? too few? every day? How many days?

Total mystery ... that is why I am doing so few. ;)
Lol. There is a balance, I do body weight squats on the same day that I play tennis. But usually if I’m playing I try to get my workout in earlier in the day then play in the evening. Which for me includes a nap in between, I take a half hour nap every afternoon.

Your body adapts to the stress after enough time training. I wouldn’t suggest a full blown leg workout before going to play tennis. But I don’t consider the body weight squats in my CrossFit workouts to be that intense like doing 6 sets of bar squats and calf raises.

Like today I did do a couple of sets of weighted squats and calf raise which I do 2-3 times a week and that is my weight leg workouts. Which is no more than just a maintenance leg workout I don’t move up the weight or go for multiple sets, so this is not that intense and easy to recover from. Then I do chest and triceps and again it’s just a maintenance type workout. This workout take around 20 minutes and then I do my 1 mile run.

Since I have been doing these type of workouts for years it’s easy for me to recover from and I could easily go out and play tennis this evening. Since I’ve added the CrossFit and running to my routine that took me a while to get used to. For me the aerobic type workouts take more out of me than the weight training does. But now after a year of staying with this training I have adapted and it’s not so rough on me.

I do weight training to prevent injuries and the aerobic to help my endurance on the court and the added aerobic style training has really helped my tennis. It’s not easy especially at first but it has paid off and I suggest to any of the older guys that want to stay on the court into old age to do some kind of training besides just your time on the court.
 

Sardines

Professional
I am from Middle-Europe, i always play on clay.
Extrem grips, grinding style.
Do you have experience with that parameters?
The problem with grinders is that they need to be physically fitter than their all court/attacking counterparts. As we age, hitting winners or running down balls all day is just not an option against younger guys. So hopefully, the mind is still there to change things up and use pace and placement changeups to throw rhythm and force errors. Obviously we have to be realistic, but most importantly, enjoy the game!
I have the same question always come up ... even with my simple body weight squats. I would like to do them several times a day ... every day... but what about the day I will play tennis? I had calf and hamstring injuries ... from too weak? too tight? Sure seems like squats before tennis is a "too tight" risk. How many body weight squats is too many? too few? every day? How many days?
I would not let someone else to tell you how much you can or cannot do. There are too many variables. Medical background, present meds, physical condition. The best general advice is to start slowly and build up, paying attention to your body's reaction. The most important thing is to start! haha
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Lol. There is a balance, I do body weight squats on the same day that I play tennis. But usually if I’m playing I try to get my workout in earlier in the day then play in the evening. Which for me includes a nap in between, I take a half hour nap every afternoon.

Your body adapts to the stress after enough time training. I wouldn’t suggest a full blown leg workout before going to play tennis. But I don’t consider the body weight squats in my CrossFit workouts to be that intense like doing 6 sets of bar squats and calf raises.

Like today I did do a couple of sets of weighted squats and calf raise which I do 2-3 times a week and that is my weight leg workouts. Which is no more than just a maintenance leg workout I don’t move up the weight or go for multiple sets, so this is not that intense and easy to recover from. Then I do chest and triceps and again it’s just a maintenance type workout. This workout take around 20 minutes and then I do my 1 mile run.

Since I have been doing these type of workouts for years it’s easy for me to recover from and I could easily go out and play tennis this evening. Since I’ve added the CrossFit and running to my routine that took me a while to get used to. For me the aerobic type workouts take more out of me than the weight training does. But now after a year of staying with this training I have adapted and it’s not so rough on me.

I do weight training to prevent injuries and the aerobic to help my endurance on the court and the added aerobic style training has really helped my tennis. It’s not easy especially at first but it has paid off and I suggest to any of the older guys that want to stay on the court into old age to do some kind of training besides just your time on the court.
You are a frickin animal ... a napping animal. I pulled a muscle just reading your routine. I did body weight squats last night before going to bed ... right knee made crunching noises. Is that bad? :eek: No pain.

Looked it up ... I have crepitus (no @Shroud ... not creepitus) ... benign crepitus ... I can snap crackle and crunch as long as no pain. 8-B(y)

https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a19540302/is-it-bad-that-my-knees-crack-when-i-squat/
 
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tlm

G.O.A.T.
You are a frickin animal ... a napping animal. I pulled a muscle just reading your routine. I did body weight squats last night before going to bed ... right knee made crunching noises. Is that bad? :eek: No pain.

Looked it up ... I have crepitus (no @Shroud ... not creepitus) ... benign crepitus ... I can snap crackle and crunch as long as no pain. 8-B(y)

https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a19540302/is-it-bad-that-my-knees-crack-when-i-squat/
I get some crunching sound in my shoulder when I bench press sometimes, but like your knee I feel no pain so I don’t worry about it.
 
I'm giving serious consideration to giving up my Pure Aero and trying an oversize frame, if you look on youtube at any of the 65's national championship doubles matches they are all using Asics or Gamma oversized frames, I'm just not sure if I can do it yet (I'm 56).
Find some old POG OS frames or better yet Head Radical Tour OS’s (Austria) I have stockpiled several of The latter for my post 65 days!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
Primary determinants of how your body's going to hold up playing tennis as you age:

1. Genetics: Single biggest issue and you can't control it. Some folks can just bang around all the time for years and years and just never get hurt. Their bodies are better suited for activity.
2. How much tennis you've played: How much wear and tear you've put on your body over the years. (Can't change that now... what's done is done.)
3. Court surface: If possible - and I realize it's not always possible - stick to soft surfaces. Clay, for example, is much easier on your body relative to hard courts. Yeah, you see guys like McEnroe playing on quasi-hard surfaces for those Pro Shares events but he plays the vast majority of his tennis on har tru, which is one of the main reasons he's still out there competing so well at 60.
4. Weight: If you're heavy, carrying that extra weight around is going to take a toll on your body.
5. Hitting vs. Match Play: Matches are harder on your body than hitting because you're doing more hard starting and stopping. As you age, probably a good idea to hit/drill more and play fewer matches. You can get the same endurance benefits from hitting/drilling by just taking fewer breaks.
6. Off-court exercise: Has to help but I don't know much about this

I'm sure there are other issues but those are the big ones (I think).
Agreed on all points. Question: with the population aging in the baby boomers retiring while why has someone not invented a soft, Cush and Hard court surface that is enjoyable to play on yet easy to maintain? Maintaining Clay is a complete pain in the behind. Many of us would build a court at home if such an option existed.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
@Hmgraphite1 ... I am starting to think I don't train as good as @tlm. I just started my day with a cup of coffee 1/3 half and half, and a chocolate chip cookie microwaved for 30 seconds. Oh ... and my recent addition of low dose blood pressure pill.
Got load up on energy first(y)
I get some crunching sound in my shoulder when I bench press sometimes, but like your knee I feel no pain so I don’t worry about it.
You are setting the bar pretty high
Find some old POG OS frames or better yet Head Radical Tour OS’s (Austria) I have stockpiled several of The latter for my post 65 days!
Keep pushing the age level higher for these

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Agreed on all points. Question: with the population aging in the baby boomers retiring while why has someone not invented a soft, Cush and Hard court surface that is enjoyable to play on yet easy to maintain? Maintaining Clay is a complete pain in the behind. Many of us would build a court at home if such an option existed.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
I might need to make my backyard into a grass court
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I’ve never taken a ride on a bike like that, it sure looks like that would be a workout with those huge tires.
Absolutely useless cheap bike other than what I am using it for ... cardio replacement for jogging. It would suck as a cruiser, lol if one was thinking mountain bike ... all you can do to peddle the 50lbs on pavement. Like I said, it was even harder to peddle before I replaced the front sprocket. I originally got it thinking I was stand up on the peddles the entire time ... I lived on a bike as a kid ... could ride a wheelie forever. Hopped on bike first time, stood up on peddles, and didn't even make it 200 yards before I was dying. I thought to myself... well, that was a waste of $100. A quick internet search about the bike showed I was not alone ... too frickin hard to peddle. That's where I got the bigger sprocket idea ... which was yet another youtube DIY episode ... chain breaking, chain replacement, yada yada yada. New sprocket ... and ride sitting down (yeah ... that was a quick purchase from Amazon for a better seat) ... and could ride a lap. Yeah!!! I got up to 2.5-3 miles at one point, but starting out again this spring one is all I got.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
Absolutely useless cheap bike other than what I am using it for ... cardio replacement for jogging. It would suck as a cruiser, lol if one was thinking mountain bike ... all you can do to peddle the 50lbs on pavement. Like I said, it was even harder to peddle before I replaced the front sprocket. I originally got it thinking I was stand up on the peddles the entire time ... I lived on a bike as a kid ... could ride a wheelie forever. Hopped on bike first time, stood up on peddles, and didn't even make it 200 yards before I was dying. I thought to myself... well, that was a waste of $100. A quick internet search about the bike showed I was not alone ... too frickin hard to peddle. That's where I got the bigger sprocket idea ... which was yet another youtube DIY episode ... chain breaking, chain replacement, yada yada yada. New sprocket ... and ride sitting down (yeah ... that was a quick purchase from Amazon for a better seat) ... and could ride a lap. Yeah!!! I got up to 2.5-3 miles at one point, but starting out again this spring one is all I got.
The good thing about bike riding is that it’s a great workout for the legs but doesn’t hurt the knees and there’s no pounding. But that contraption looks like a torture machine, good thing is you don’t have to take long rides for a good workout.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
I just read @tlm 's sig - reading his workout routine makes me sore and exhausted, his string setup makes my arm fall off!


I'm in awe.
I need to update my Sig. I’m back to using my Wilson six one 95. With 17 gauge ALU at 70lbs.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I'm not starting this Spring in as bad of shape as I thought. Just did 2.5 miles on the tractor ... not even huffing and puffing this time. Definitely feel the burn in the legs. Turns out a 50lb bike is a form of interval workout if you have any inclines/declines. I have some in my park 1 mile loop that you wouldn't even notice if you were jogging, but 50lbs downhill goes faster than my tractor gear, and slight incline is a biaaatch!!! Even on the dead flat sections ... if you have a 20lb wind against you ... you notice it. That's one thing about jogging ... you can't cheat ... if you are jogging/running ... you are flat working out.

70lbs? Whaaaat ... it's 2019. Isn't it? :unsure:
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
Agreed on all points. Question: with the population aging in the baby boomers retiring while why has someone not invented a soft, Cush and Hard court surface that is enjoyable to play on yet easy to maintain? Maintaining Clay is a complete pain in the behind. Many of us would build a court at home if such an option existed.
These exist, actually, they're just not really that great or durable (and they're expensive). A guy I know has a tennis-playing father in his 70s who has a cushioned soft-surface court at his house. You can put your thumb to the court and feel the give. It's not a bad court - definitely easier on the body than a regular hard court - but the bounce is really low. Still, it's not a bad court. But I want to say it cost over US$20,000 to install the surface over the original hard court and it develops dead spots over time where the ball doesn't bounce at all. I think there are various companies that make something similar to this. (This is not plexicushion, by the way, which is only slightly softer than concrete.) So, they're out there, but not that popular.
 

jmnk

Hall of Fame
In preparation of my 50th (48 now), I've already switched racquets to a lighter, more powerful racquet, from a K90 to a few different 95+ to SV98+ for now.
Compared to my 30s, the strokes are now more spin, mechanics still the same. Only the serve has changed a little bit from the deep hip lean into the court, to the more upright 'trophy' stance. Serve is now about placement and setup, rather than aces.
Warming up is longer with bands and dynamic stretching, warm downs including a bit of strength training and a lot of stretching.
Off court, I wake up to a 15 minute yoga stretching routine every day. For workouts, I do HIIT 3 times a week (1 heavy and 2 light) and aerobic/cardio of 30+ mins on road/stationary bike or stair climber or running on grass about 4 times a week, on top of hitting 4 times a week for about 2+ hours. I have 1 rest day a week, which is random to how I feel. but no more than 4 every 28 days. Sleep about 7.5 hrs a day, seems I'm need less sleep in one go so having a nap after lunch and before dinner is important.
I'm competitive at UTR12.2, and I find it's easier to do seasonal vs year round training, with build up about 1.5 months before the actual season, then change to light work outs with more court time.
I play for fun and enjoyment, as well as hitting something HARD to offload tension sometimes. I enjoy the artistry of playing now more vs the win only mentality. I don't do meds or supplements of any kind, watch my G.I. intake and eat healthy about 85% of the time.
Wait, you are utr 12.2 at age 48? OK.......

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Fintft

Legend
Do what Monfils does (he found Svitolina). Or Wawrinka with Donna Vekic.

That's what I call adjustments!

Heck my tennis coaches are females 23-27 :)
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
I'm not starting this Spring in as bad of shape as I thought. Just did 2.5 miles on the tractor ... not even huffing and puffing this time. Definitely feel the burn in the legs. Turns out a 50lb bike is a form of interval workout if you have any inclines/declines. I have some in my park 1 mile loop that you wouldn't even notice if you were jogging, but 50lbs downhill goes faster than my tractor gear, and slight incline is a biaaatch!!! Even on the dead flat sections ... if you have a 20lb wind against you ... you notice it. That's one thing about jogging ... you can't cheat ... if you are jogging/running ... you are flat working out.

70lbs? Whaaaat ... it's 2019. Isn't it? :unsure:
It really does not feel bad, not near as harsh as you would think. You have to remember if I string a racket at 70 lbs just sitting in my bag the first 24 hours I can’t remember for sure but it loses at least 5lbs. Then a few more the next day and another 3 or 4 after the first hit. So I probably end up actually playing with around 60 lbs. Plus even though it is 2019 there are still some pro players that use up to 70lbs of tension.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Hurts my back just thinking about it. Maybe I should change my name to ByeByeP*ssy.
What hurts your back ... and why did I take a hit. :p Does the thought of Svitolina or Donna Vekic hurt your back? Or TLM 70lbs. Or my bike? I have lost the frickin plot.
 

Wise one

Hall of Fame
I know the thread "Seniors lounge (over 50) come on in" exists but I wanted to start this thread to find out how other forum members have adapted as they've become older in order to continue playing, stay competitive, get fulfillment from the game, etc.. Areas to consider and comment on...

-Equipment changes
-Stroke technique/mechanics
-Match play strategy and tactics
-Frequency of playing and rest/recovery practices
-Off-court training and injury prevention
-Intangibles (expectations, intensity, purpose the game now serves in your life, accommodate other life changes, etc.)

Just stay healthy! This guy had more than 100 children!

 
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These exist, actually, they're just not really that great or durable (and they're expensive). A guy I know has a tennis-playing father in his 70s who has a cushioned soft-surface court at his house. You can put your thumb to the court and feel the give. It's not a bad court - definitely easier on the body than a regular hard court - but the bounce is really low. Still, it's not a bad court. But I want to say it cost over US$20,000 to install the surface over the original hard court and it develops dead spots over time where the ball doesn't bounce at all. I think there are various companies that make something similar to this. (This is not plexicushion, by the way, which is only slightly softer than concrete.) So, they're out there, but not that popular.
Sounds like what my buddy installed at a nice indoor club where he was head pro for 20+ years. Very soft but fast as all get out!!!


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navigator

Hall of Fame
I'm competitive at UTR12.2, and I find it's easier to do seasonal vs year round training, with build up about 1.5 months before the actual season, then change to light work outs with more court time.
Amazing. The #1 ITF over-50 player is a 12 UTR and was a top-100 ATP player. You must have had quite a tennis career.
 
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