Advices for manual tennis stringing machine

Pashmak

New User
Hi, I am a french student, tennis player and employee in a small tennis club. I am looking forward to buy a manual tennis stringing machine, mainly for being independent and for learning something. Here are more details about the use I will make of it.

I have no experience with stringing but learn quickly, planning to learn via watching videos. I am expecting to string less than 20 racquets per month, with a mean of 10 I would say, all types of strings and racquets, and for probably more than 20 years. My budget can be up to the most expensive manual machines, but I do not want to buy anything unuseful or unecessary in my situation. I mainly want accuracy, durability/reliability, other aspects such as convenience (except for health concerns, working position), speed and weight are secondary.

What do you recommend? Any models, brands?

As of my research, it seems that Stringway machines are very high quality materials and finish that can last long, and other reviews seem to praise the brand in general (support, guarantee, clamps, etc.). If you have informations on the Stringway machines, how would you say these technologies change the machine: drop-weight instead of spring? Flying or fixed clamps? Concorde (system for 360 degree rotation)? Stand or table top?

Thank you in advance for your answers!
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
One word Stringway. Maybe @Stringway Official can recommend an appropriate model for you.

A drop weight is too slow andi like constant pull machine especially when stringing for others. An eCP does not meet your criteria.
 

Pashmak

New User
One word Stringway. Maybe @Stringway Official can recommend an appropriate model for you.

A drop weight is too slow andi like constant pull machine especially when stringing for others. An eCP does not meet your criteria.
Thank you for your answer Irvin, I sent an e-mail to Fred that recommends the ML100/120 with Concorde. But as being unexperienced with stringing I cannot fully
determine how this would fit me, that is why I am looking for users knowledge and feedback!

How slower is a drop-weight tensioner compared to a string-driven? Are there other practical differences? I don't mind a little more time spent if the drop-weight is more accurate, or if fixed clamps or a stand are needed (because the string-driven MS140 does not perform well on a stand and is only sold with flying clamps). But I need some informations on these too!
 
How slower is a drop-weight tensioner compared to a string-driven?

An answer to this one:
There is no difference in speed between the ML100 and the MS140, it is the same tension head only driven differently.
And it is important to understand that the string determines the speed.
On both systems you have to wait until the lever does not move anymore because the string stopped stretching.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Thank you for your answer Irvin, I sent an e-mail to Fred that recommends the ML100/120 with Concorde. But as being unexperienced with stringing I cannot fully
determine how this would fit me, that is why I am looking for users knowledge and feedback!

How slower is a drop-weight tensioner compared to a string-driven? Are there other practical differences? I don't mind a little more time spent if the drop-weight is more accurate, or if fixed clamps or a stand are needed (because the string-driven MS140 does not perform well on a stand and is only sold with flying clamps). But I need some informations on these too!
Once you get used to a drop weight, the DW does not increase the time much especially with a stiffer string. Each string you tension will have about as much stretch as the previous string. I have a DW with a ratchet system I can set the string in the gripper, hand tighten the string, then count the ratchet clicks to get the bar level. Each successive string is about the same. As long as the DW bar is within 5 degrees of level the DW is very Accurate. Fixed clamps are a far better option than flying clamps, no matter how good the flying clamps are.
 

jim e

Legend
Just get a quality e cp machine and be done with it, especially with the number of racquets you will be stringing, as that number will increase if you do a good job.
Most people that start to string, and then decided that they will continue to so, typically later sell the machine that they first purchased, then upgrade to a better machine, some even then sell that one and upgrade again. I started with an automatic drop weight machine back in 1968. There wasn't much to choose from back then. I now use an electronic cp machine. No comparison from what I started with. No doubt , better machine, more enjoyable the job. If my unit should ever fail, I would no doubt get something similar to what I have now, not less. Fixed clamps is what I started with back in the day, and that is what any decent pro shop stringer uses. Less drawback, and twisting.
If you know that you are definitely stringing for a while, get as much as you can afford. With the number of racquets you have stated you will be starting to string, a great quality electronic machine will pay back in short time. No one has ever complained that they got too much of a machine, but many upgraded. I would just start with a great machine from the beginning. At this time , if I had to string with a drop weight, with floating clamps, I would probably just be stringing my own and not want to bother with anyone else. You pay up front and get the convenience, and that makes it more enjoyable. Just my opinion.
 

Pashmak

New User
Once you get used to a drop weight, the DW does not increase the time much especially with a stiffer string. Each string you tension will have about as much stretch as the previous string. I have a DW with a ratchet system I can set the string in the gripper, hand tighten the string, then count the ratchet clicks to get the bar level. Each successive string is about the same. As long as the DW bar is within 5 degrees of level the DW is very Accurate. Fixed clamps are a far better option than flying clamps, no matter how good the flying clamps are.
I see, a drop-weight system seems to be a nice compromise. Although on Stringway machines they don't have a ratchet which make it faster, I guess?
Well it seems that there is a consensus that fixed clamps are better than flying clamps like you said, but how exactly? Is it also the case for Stringway clamps?
 

Pashmak

New User
Just get a quality e cp machine and be done with it, especially with the number of racquets you will be stringing, as that number will increase if you do a good job.
Most people that start to string, and then decided that they will continue to so, typically later sell the machine that they first purchased, then upgrade to a better machine, some even then sell that one and upgrade again. I started with an automatic drop weight machine back in 1968. There wasn't much to choose from back then. I now use an electronic cp machine. No comparison from what I started with. No doubt , better machine, more enjoyable the job. If my unit should ever fail, I would no doubt get something similar to what I have now, not less. Fixed clamps is what I started with back in the day, and that is what any decent pro shop stringer uses. Less drawback, and twisting.
If you know that you are definitely stringing for a while, get as much as you can afford. With the number of racquets you have stated you will be starting to string, a great quality electronic machine will pay back in short time. No one has ever complained that they got too much of a machine, but many upgraded. I would just start with a great machine from the beginning. At this time , if I had to string with a drop weight, with floating clamps, I would probably just be stringing my own and not want to bother with anyone else. You pay up front and get the convenience, and that makes it more enjoyable. Just my opinion.
Agree with your principle of purchasing the highest quality possible. But how do you evaluate the benefits of an electronic tensioner compared to a drop-weight?

Because, ~10 racquets per month did not seem a lot for me, so I did not really consider electronic pulling to gain time (mainly, along other benefits I guess?).

In fact, yes I am planning to string for some time, I am 20 years old, so possibly 30 years or more if the machine stays functionable. But that is secondary to things like my studies and work, therefore I won't string much more than this. It is also not for primarily for making money, but rather do something myself and dig into the art of it. Also, my budget cannot get to high-end electronic machines, I prefer buying highest quality manual pulling than a low quality electronic one. What do you think?
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Just get a Stringway DW. Even if you do more than 20 frames/month, you will get fast enough to do them in 25-35 min each. If you have space/storage issues, get the table top versions. 3¢
 

Bambooman

Hall of Fame
Nice, tell us more about it.
It's an aluminum tower with the frame held by two U bolts with leather pads. The yoke is also clamped lightly to the top of one tower with a padded bolt.

The clamps are notched Sheet metal vice grips with wooden notched spacers.

The system to tension the string is a reversed spreader clamp with two wooden plates to grip the string.

I calibrated the tension with a fishing scale Three pumps of the handle gives me my standard tension
 

kabrac

Professional
Like @Irvin said, I have a Gamma Progression II, I think he basically has the same(Progression X), except his has a square blue metal tray, mine is red plastic. Great machines and i have Stringway double and triple clamps that i hardly even use. I find the Gamma ones it comes with work fine. Not much to go wrong with something so simple and it's so easy to use and portable.
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Hi, I am a french student, tennis player and employee in a small tennis club. I am looking forward to buy a manual tennis stringing machine, mainly for being independent and for learning something. Here are more details about the use I will make of it.

I have no experience with stringing but learn quickly, planning to learn via watching videos. I am expecting to string less than 20 racquets per month, with a mean of 10 I would say, all types of strings and racquets, and for probably more than 20 years. My budget can be up to the most expensive manual machines, but I do not want to buy anything unuseful or unecessary in my situation. I mainly want accuracy, durability/reliability, other aspects such as convenience (except for health concerns, working position), speed and weight are secondary.

What do you recommend? Any models, brands?

As of my research, it seems that Stringway machines are very high quality materials and finish that can last long, and other reviews seem to praise the brand in general (support, guarantee, clamps, etc.). If you have informations on the Stringway machines, how would you say these technologies change the machine: drop-weight instead of spring? Flying or fixed clamps? Concorde (system for 360 degree rotation)? Stand or table top?

Thank you in advance for your answers!
In 1996 I bought a Gamma progression 200 (or progression II) that came with a sample of 20 string sets, for about $220. In 2012 I upgraded the mounting to a 6 point. I still use it. As good as new. Came with the stringing manual by the US Stringers association,
clamps awl stringer's awl, hex key, etc. and that's how I learned to string.

Some will tell you you can string in 20 mins; not with a drop weight, not unless you're aiming for a hack job. To do it right you need 40-60 mins depending on racquet string type, tension, etc..

If you string more than two racquets a day, you may want to invest in an electronic version, with the caveat that they're much more expensive (3x), need calibration, and will not last 30 years.
 
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PaddyDutch

Semi-Pro
I see, a drop-weight system seems to be a nice compromise. Although on Stringway machines they don't have a ratchet which make it faster, I guess?
Well it seems that there is a consensus that fixed clamps are better than flying clamps like you said, but how exactly? Is it also the case for Stringway clamps?
The non-ratchet makes it much quicker to use. On a machine with a ratchet you need to adjust until the drop bar is horizontal. On a Stringway that does not happen.

Fixed clamps are also faster and easier in use. Good flying clamps exist and you can get good results, but fixed clamps are just superior to flying clamps. That also goes for Stringway clamps.
 
Maybe it gives a good feeling that you can upgrade to single action fixed clamps T92 later.
poXaTYMoj

That very view stringers use this upgrade may mean that they are happy with the double plus triple clamp.

For the best possible stringing result it is best to use 2 triples for the mains so that the mains can be strung symmetrically.
 
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Pashmak

New User
Just get a Stringway DW. Even if you do more than 20 frames/month, you will get fast enough to do them in 25-35 min each. If you have space/storage issues, get the table top versions. 3¢
This is what seems reasonable for me. Although I don't know how much time it would take to string, but I does not matter the most. For those of you having a drop-weight how much time does it take at minimum?
 

Pashmak

New User
It's an aluminum tower with the frame held by two U bolts with leather pads. The yoke is also clamped lightly to the top of one tower with a padded bolt.

The clamps are notched Sheet metal vice grips with wooden notched spacers.

The system to tension the string is a reversed spreader clamp with two wooden plates to grip the string.

I calibrated the tension with a fishing scale Three pumps of the handle gives me my standard tension
Nice work, also pretty uncommon I believe to use wood, do you think it will keep well during time?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
This is what seems reasonable for me. Although I don't know how much time it would take to string, but I does not matter the most. For those of you having a drop-weight how much time does it take at minimum?
There are different types of drop weights machines. The string way is an automatic DW while the version I have you should get the bar level. The Automatic would be faster. There are also fixed clamp DWs and those that require flying clamps. Fixed clamps are faster. I have a Gamma DW with flying clamps which is the slowest model and I can string a racket in about 25-30 minutes.

EDIT: If you’re an inexperienced stringer it will take a few hours to string your first racket and you should be down to about an hour in no time. Most of the time is taken just weaving the crosses.
 

Pashmak

New User
Like @Irvin said, I have a Gamma Progression II, I think he basically has the same(Progression X), except his has a square blue metal tray, mine is red plastic. Great machines and i have Stringway double and triple clamps that i hardly even use. I find the Gamma ones it comes with work fine. Not much to go wrong with something so simple and it's so easy to use and portable.
In 1996 I bought a Gamma progression 200 (or progression II) that came with a sample of 20 string sets, for about $220. In 2012 I upgraded the mounting to a 6 point. I still use it. As good as new. Came with the stringing manual by the US Stringers association,
clamps awl stringer's awl, hex key, etc. and that's how I learned to string.

Some will tell you you can string in 20 mins; not with a drop weight, not unless you're aiming for a hack job. To do it right you need 40-60 mins depending on racquet string type, tension, etc..

If you string more than two racquets a day, you may want to invest in an electronic version, with the caveat that they're much more expensive (3x), need calibration, and will not last 30 years.
Gamma Progression models seem to get a lot of praise also. But how do they compare to Stringway's? From user's reviews I understand that Stringway's clamps, mounting system, durability are better. Also the brand support and guarantee seem to attract.

Agreeing with your advice yonexRx32, I don't think that I need an electronic machine. Also, even if it is now old, do you have the stringing manual by the United States Stringer Association? Would you send it to me? It could be a serious support for learning stringing.
 
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Pashmak

New User
The non-ratchet makes it much quicker to use. On a machine with a ratchet you need to adjust until the drop bar is horizontal. On a Stringway that does not happen.

Fixed clamps are also faster and easier in use. Good flying clamps exist and you can get good results, but fifiwde o flying clamps. That also goes for Stringway clamps.
Well, how exactly "fixed clamps are just superior to flying clamps" and "faster and easier in use"? For a beginner like me, I just know that fixed clamps are, well fixed, and flying clamps are not. For this reason I could even imagine that flying clamps are better because you can approach from every angle and you would get more freedom.
 

Pashmak

New User
Maybe it gives a good feeling that you can upgrade to single action fixed clamps T92 later.
poXaTYMoj

That very view stringers use this upgrade may mean that they are happy with the double plus triple clamp.

For the best possible stringing result it is best to use 2 triples for the mains so that the mains can be strung symmetrically.
Yes, it is an option to upgrade later. But with this process it costs more than buying fixed clamps right away, and it seems logical to buy these right away if needed. Here is where there is the most work: try to determine if it is better! Especially because I do not have experience, I need advices on choosing. Stringway Official, is it possible to tell me what is the best-seller between these four: flying clamps with and without Concorde, fixed clamps with and without Concorde? It could help in understanding the best quality/price ratio chosen by the people.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I could even imagine that flying clamps are better because you can approach from every angle and you would get more freedom.
It is just the opposite. The flying clamps that come with a machine have a fixed spacing and if you look at most rackets the string are not evenly spaced making it difficult to clamp 2 strings. Because fixed clamps only clamp 1 string it is faster and easier.
 

Pashmak

New User
There are different types of drop weights machines. The string way is an automatic DW while the version I have you should get the bar level. The Automatic would be faster. There are also fixed clamp DWs and those that require flying clamps. Fixed clamps are faster. I have a Gamma DW with flying clamps which is the slowest model and I can string a racket in about 25-30 minutes.

EDIT: If you’re an inexperienced stringer it will take a few hours to string your first racket and you should be down to about an hour in no time. Most of the time is taken just weaving the crosses.
So, with a ratchet drop-weight and flying clamps you can string in less than 30 minutes? How much time do you think it would takes for you with fixed clamps? Because 30 minutes seems very quick already to me.
 

Pashmak

New User
It is just the opposite. The flying clamps that come with a machine have a fixed spacing and if you look at most rackets the string are not evenly spaced making it difficult to clamp 2 strings. Because fixed clamps only clamp 1 string it is faster and easier.
I understand. I assume fixed clamps do not need to clamp multiple strings because they are on a support, which helps maintaining tension? Whereas flying clamps support moretension themselves?
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Gamma Progression models seem to get a lot of praise also. But how do they compare to Stringway's? From user's reviews I understand that Stringway's clamps, mounting system, durability are better. Also the brand support and guarantee seem to attract.

Agreeing with your advice yonexRx32, I don't think that I need an electronic machine. Also, even if it is now old, do you have the stringing manual by the United States Stringer Association? Would you send it to me? It could be a serious support for learning stringing.
I never had a problem with the machine. To compare machines one would have to have needed two. Since they last a lifetime, it will be hard to find someone that had both machines. I no longer have the manual. You should be able to find it online.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
So, with a ratchet drop-weight and flying clamps you can string in less than 30 minutes? How much time do you think it would takes for you with fixed clamps? Because 30 minutes seems very quick already to me.
About 15-20 minutes

EDIT: That’s with an eCP machine. When you actuate the tensioner you can immediately move you attention to the clamp. My guess is that will save at least 8-10 seconds for every string. That amounts to over 5 minutes per racket on 16x19 rackets to just move the clamps to the next string.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Many stringers wanting to start out with a DW soon lose their patience and either give up stringing, or upgrade very quickly.
 

yonexRx32

Professional
About 15-20 minutes

EDIT: That’s with an eCP machine. When you actuate the tensioner you can immediately move you attention to the clamp. My guess is that will save at least 8-10 seconds for every string. That amounts to over 5 minutes per racket on 16x19 rackets to just move the clamps to the next string.
I've done it with a DW for 28 years. On some racquets (16x18) that require only one piece stringing, with a non coated string that doesn't stretch much (Prince original syn gut) and weaves easily, you may be able to do it in 20 mins,.with three floating clamps instead of two, and in perfect conditions. Otherwise, don't count on it. 40-60 mins with some practice. Measuring, cutting, tying the knots, untangling the string, etc, takes time. Skipping a weave because you rushed and figuring it out only after you tied the last knot on that natural gut job with power pads? Priceless!
 
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yonexRx32

Professional
I watched a review of the Stringway because I was intrigued by their tensioning system for DW. I was not impressed. If I were to do it again, I would take a hard look at the Alpha Pioneer DCPlus. Gamma seems to have cheapened the build of their entry level machines. They look more like Klippermates than back in the day. The Alpha and the Gamma were the finalists of my extensive research on the topic back when and they seemed virtually identical back then. Alpha also provides a pdf of the manual which shows you all you need to start stringing. Gamma had one also back in the day. They may still have one.

Eagnas smart 707 is also intriguing.. and comes with a few goodies like it was 1996 all over again.
 
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Bambooman

Hall of Fame
Nice work, also pretty uncommon I believe to use wood, do you think it will keep well during time?
Hardwood of various types. It compresses and forms grooves and then stays stable. Also provides excellent grip without needing anything added.
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
I think it's best if you set a max budget, and see what you can get for that. Fixed vs floating, drop weight vs electronic vs crank, there are a plethora of choices out there and most will do the job of stringing. It's about the "how" and details that gets tricky. You will find plenty of happy owners and also detractors for all types of machines unfortunately.
I strung as an 13 year old with a klippermate. Took me 35-40mins. My kids had no experience either. We have tried the fixed clamp machines like the Gamma XLS, a Pro's Pro MT400, and the kids learnt initially on a Yonex 5 about weaving etc, with my local pro stringer. We settled on the flying clamps (Claws) of the Pro Stringer because of the lightweight and mobility. After initial period of tension experimentation, we figured out the tensions that worked finally. My then 9 year old learned quickly and now at 12, strings a racquet in 20 mins with our Pro Stringer. We do about 4-6 sticks a week, between the 4 of us.
Good flying clamps work as well as fixed clamps for the most part, but can't get right up to the grommets at corner crosses of the racquet, due to the curvature of the hoop and also the mains.. The drawback is 1+mm more than the top end machines with the Claws. However, with tension adjustment, they play as well.
As for the longevity of electronics, obviously all stringers will not last without maintenance, and the electronic stringers may be higher maintenance to care for. PCBs have a life of 15-25 years, so it's about keeping it dry and cool (less than 40-60% humidity, below 25°C). It's the intricate mechanical parts that you have to worry about. Drop weights are simpler but they still break down. Klippermate had several parts break on me.
Practically. are you realistic on the requirements? Remember you are a student, and there will be times when 35-40 mins to string a racquet needs to be 20-25 mins, because of exams, dates,work etc. Then the longevity requirement, remember your life will change once you graduate, get a job etc. I found it too time consuming to string and play after graduation and work and social life gets in the way. So I paid for my stringing. Even now, 20+ years later, with my own machine, I mostly still send my sticks to be strung by my pro, because it's convenient (drop racquet off before play, ready 2 hours later when I'm done too), and I'm too busy.
Check out the Germany brand, China made Pro's Pro machines, as well as the used market.
Agree with your principle of purchasing the highest quality possible. But how do you evaluate the benefits of an electronic tensioner compared to a drop-weight?

Because, ~10 racquets per month did not seem a lot for me, so I did not really consider electronic pulling to gain time (mainly, along other benefits I guess?).

In fact, yes I am planning to string for some time, I am 20 years old, so possibly 30 years or more if the machine stays functionable. But that is secondary to things like my studies and work, therefore I won't string much more than this. It is also not for primarily for making money, but rather do something myself and dig into the art of it. Also, my budget cannot get to high-end electronic machines, I prefer buying highest quality manual pulling than a low quality electronic one. What do you think?
Are you are referring to the Stringway clamps? For us, using the Stringway triple on mains required dropping tension to offset the extra stiffness. The Claws fit right between the gaps of the strings without pull. It's definitely faster to clamp with the Claws overall.
It is just the opposite. The flying clamps that come with a machine have a fixed spacing and if you look at most rackets the string are not evenly spaced making it difficult to clamp 2 strings. Because fixed clamps only clamp 1 string it is faster and easier.
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Here is a stringer that moves her flying clamps much faster than I do.

What tensioner is she using? Never seen one like that. The string she uses looks like metal wire. Seems to have no stretch. With a multi it seems impossible you would be able to tension as quickly. Stretch of the string is the most time consuming aspect of DW stringing. 5-8 ratcheting motions instead of one, and waiting a second of two between each for the weight to settle.
 
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Pashmak

New User
I think it's best if you set a max budget, and see what you can get for that. Fixed vs floating, drop weight vs electronic vs crank, there are a plethora of choices out there and most will do the job of stringing. It's about the "how" and details that gets tricky. You will find plenty of happy owners and also detractors for all types of machines unfortunately.
I strung as an 13 year old with a klippermate. Took me 35-40mins. My kids had no experience either. We have tried the fixed clamp machines like the Gamma XLS, a Pro's Pro MT400, and the kids learnt initially on a Yonex 5 about weaving etc, with my local pro stringer. We settled on the flying clamps (Claws) of the Pro Stringer because of the lightweight and mobility. After initial period of tension experimentation, we figured out the tensions that worked finally. My then 9 year old learned quickly and now at 12, strings a racquet in 20 mins with our Pro Stringer. We do about 4-6 sticks a week, between the 4 of us.
Good flying clamps work as well as fixed clamps for the most part, but can't get right up to the grommets at corner crosses of the racquet, due to the curvature of the hoop and also the mains.. The drawback is 1+mm more than the top end machines with the Claws. However, with tension adjustment, they play as well.
As for the longevity of electronics, obviously all stringers will not last without maintenance, and the electronic stringers may be higher maintenance to care for. PCBs have a life of 15-25 years, so it's about keeping it dry and cool (less than 40-60% humidity, below 25°C). It's the intricate mechanical parts that you have to worry about. Drop weights are simpler but they still break down. Klippermate had several parts break on me.
Practically. are you realistic on the requirements? Remember you are a student, and there will be times when 35-40 mins to string a racquet needs to be 20-25 mins, because of exams, dates,work etc. Then the longevity requirement, remember your life will change once you graduate, get a job etc. I found it too time consuming to string and play after graduation and work and social life gets in the way. So I paid for my stringing. Even now, 20+ years later, with my own machine, I mostly still send my sticks to be strung by my pro, because it's convenient (drop racquet off before play, ready 2 hours later when I'm done too), and I'm too busy.
Check out the Germany brand, China made Pro's Pro machines, as well as the used market.

Are you are referring to the Stringway clamps? For us, using the Stringway triple on mains required dropping tension to offset the extra stiffness. The Claws fit right between the gaps of the strings without pull. It's definitely faster to clamp with the Claws overall.
Thank you for your answer. As I said I can afford all manual stringing machines. That is very nice I believe to share stringing with your kids. If they can string that fast already, they might become the fastest stringers of the West. Pro Stringer only sells the Platinum 2.0 portable machine? Is this the model you own?

I believe I am being realistic, because I like manual tasks and know how to manage free time. If stringing ever takes too much time, I will keep it to stringing for myself and close friends and family, not "clients". Even in this case it would be better for me to have the best equipment, especially for me because I am looking forward to play very competitive. Basically, I now need to figure out: flying or fixed clamps.

You're pretty much saying that flying clamps work as well as fixed clamps. How would you compare them when it comes to time spent? Also, what does everyone think of flying and fixed clamps for stringing stretchy strings (full gut, hybrid, multifilament, etc.)? A lot of people in my club are old and play stretchy strings, and it seems some machines and setup do better for these.
 
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Pashmak

New User
I watched a review of the Stringway because I was intrigued by their tensioning system for DW. I was not impressed. If I were to do it again, I would take a hard look at the Alpha Pioneer DCPlus. Gamma seems to have cheapened the build of their entry level machines. They look more like Klippermates than back in the day. The Alpha and the Gamma were the finalists of my extensive research on the topic back when and they seemed virtually identical back then. Alpha also provides a pdf of the manual which shows you all you need to start stringing. Gamma had one also back in the day. They may still have one.

Eagnas smart 707 is also intriguing.. and comes with a few goodies like it was 1996 all over again.
Are the Gamma Progression and X Series the same except for design? As @Sardines said, most of people seem to be satisfied in the sense of not having problems, but maybe the machine's quality isn't best regardless of not creating problems that can be noticed? The Gamma Progression 602 FC Pro and X-6 FC Pro have the same characteristics as a Stringway ML100-conT92, except for the mounting system that is 5-point on Stringways, the ratchet system and the guarantee. The price is higher for a Stringway. But overall the Gammas seems to get a lot of praise, like you. Based on this one should maybe get the Gamma.

As for Alpha Pioneer DCPlus, it seems to cause some problems with the tower. I did not find more informations than this, most people again seem to be satisfied.
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Yeah.. the Gamma 602 FC is a good bet. It's also an American company that may have better aftermarket support if you're in the US. You can also upgrade it to an electronic tensioner down the road, if you need to.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
I can afford all manual stringing machines.
It will help if you put a € against your budget. Assuming you're based in France rather than abroad, I'd suggest you look at the machines from your German neighbours at Tennisman.de. Their own brand is provided by Xpider, who are responsible for Tourna machines in the US.

It's worth focusing on what's easily available to you. This board is very US centric, and brands like Alpha and Gamma are far less accessible in Europe.
 

Pashmak

New User
It will help if you put a € against your budget. Assuming you're based in France rather than abroad, I'd suggest you look at the machines from your German neighbours at Tennisman.de. Their own brand is provided by Xpider, who are responsible for Tourna machines in the US.

It's worth focusing on what's easily available to you. This board is very US centric, and brands like Alpha and Gamma are far less accessible in Europe.
Thank you for pointing this out. It is simpler like you said to buy what is close. I am based near Montpellier, France and my budget is around 1400€ for a stringing machine.

Did not find much information on Stringmasters machines, but they seem high quality. The warranty is only two year though and the website is hardly translated to english, so support would be hard to get to, I think? Premium Stringer is very praised in France, especially the Preium Stringer 3600. Does anyone have thoughts on this model? Apart from these brand, Stringway is the one I am looking forward the most.
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Ah ben fallait dire que tu nageais dans la thune vieux.. 1400 balles !! T'as pas besoin de conseils.. ce qu'il te faut c'est un représentant commercial.
 

Pashmak

New User
Ah ben fallait dire que tu nageais dans la thune vieux.. 1400 balles !! T'as pas besoin de conseils.. ce qu'il te faut c'est un représentant commercial.​
Hahaha un confrère! Non je ne nage pas dans l'argent, mais je n'ai pas d'autres passions que le tennis et je n'ai pas encore de dépenses constantes (loyer, voiture, enfants), alors je suis prêt à dépenser une part de mes économies. C'est le maximum de la fourchette, je cherche surtout à ne pas acheter ce qui est inutile et je ne pense absolument pas que cela me mènerait à payer 1400€ pour une machine à corder manuelle, je ne crois même pas qu'il en existe plus cher que 1299€.​
 

yonexRx32

Professional
Regarde du côté de Pro's pro.. similaire à la 602 fc mais à 345 euros..ou alors 1080 avec tension électronique. Les machines manuelles sont les plus précises et tu pourras léguer la 602 à tes arrière-petits-enfants,.tellement c'est solide, mais si tu veux te faire un pécule, raccorder plus de deux fois par semaine, faut que cela soit rapide et non pas pénible.
 
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Sardines

Hall of Fame
Pour quoi le forum est du coup Français? :laughing:
Yes we've used the 2.0 for 3+ years now, and are very happy with it, especially with the recent upgrades with the Claws 2 and X mount. We travel to tournaments internationally, so air travel portability is a crucial consideration for us. If you don't need the portability, small size and light weight, I would suggest a good fixed clamp machine is fastest and easiest to learn.
As for time spent, we picked up stringing faster with a fixed clamp machine, and would've rather avoided the teething problems we had with the PS. One of those problems was stringing natural gut. I was finally given a solution by Pro Stringer, but it cost me 3.5 packs of natural gut. I related this in my review so others won't have to go through this.
Now I string my own gut/poly hybrids on the road without any issues on it. I do have to string 2lbs higher with the PS, than my normal tension on the Yonex Precision at my pro shop.
As for flying vs fixed, as a player I can only say as long as the stringbed responds the way I like it to, I personally don't care. Many players I hit with have racquets strung by fixed and flying, and they don't care as long as they perform. As a stringer, the issue with flying clamps is the starting pull, which requires a starting pin and starter clamp for the mains, and double pulling the top string. Those 2 things slow it down vs a fixed clamp. Now is the extra 3-4 mins a problem? That's for you to decide.

Thank you for your answer. As I said I can afford all manual stringing machines. That is very nice I believe to share stringing with your kids. If they can string that fast already, they might become the fastest stringers of the West. Pro Stringer only sells the Platinum 2.0 portable machine? Is this the model you own?

I believe I am being realistic, because I like manual tasks and know how to manage free time. If stringing ever takes too much time, I will keep it to stringing for myself and close friends and family, not "clients". Even in this case it would be better for me to have the best equipment, especially for me because I am looking forward to play very competitive. Basically, I now need to figure out: flying or fixed clamps.

You're pretty much saying that flying clamps work as well as fixed clamps. How would you compare them when it comes to time spent? Also, what does everyone think of flying and fixed clamps for stringing stretchy strings (full gut, hybrid, multifilament, etc.)? A lot of people in my club are old and play stretchy strings, and it seems some machines and setup do better for these.
 
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