"Air Jaws": Record-Breaking Shark Breach

Greetings, boys!

Today's beast with the least... challengers... is the...

SHORT-FACED BEAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!





Standing 12 feet tall, with a vertical arm reach of 14 feet, and weighing in at well over a ton, the Terror of the Pleistocene must have been a positively nightmarish prospect for creatures unfortunate enough to cross its path. :oops:
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
Epic thread. Love all these prehistoric animals.

I wish I could teleport back in time to check things out. Maybe start with the carboniferous period first and see centipedes as big as cars, then move on to the dinosaurs. Assuming I wasn't eaten immediately.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Greetings, boys!

Today's beast with the least... challengers... is the...

SHORT-FACED BEAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!





Standing 12 feet tall, with a vertical arm reach of 14 feet, and weighing in at well over a ton, the Terror of the Pleistocene must have been a positively nightmarish prospect for creatures unfortunate enough to cross its path. :oops:
A polar bear can get that big. And they are usually hungry. Watched an episode of Planet Earth last week where the polar bears hunted beluga whales twice their size by springing into the water and grabbing them by the neck. The bear then drags the whale onto the ice to feed its young’uns.
 
Epic thread. Love all these prehistoric animals.

I wish I could teleport back in time to check things out. Maybe start with the carboniferous period first and see centipedes as big as cars, then move on to the dinosaurs. Assuming I wasn't eaten immediately.
Gracias! Yeah, what kid at heart doesn't get a thrill from such toothy monsters. Sparked the human imagination since time immemorial.

A polar bear can get that big. And they are usually hungry. Watched an episode of Planet Earth last week where the polar bears hunted beluga whales twice their size by springing into the water and grabbing them by the neck. The bear then drags the whale onto the ice to feed its young’uns.
Source? My data suggests that polar bears top out at 1,500 lbs or so. Considerably smaller than the 2,200 lb mammoth-slaying short-faced bear! :eek:

The plight of the polar bear is particularly tragic.
 
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travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Gracias! Yeah, what kid at heart doesn't get a thrill from such toothsome monsters. Sparked the human imagination since time immemorial.


Source? My data suggests that polar bears top out at 1,500 lbs or so. Considerably smaller than the 2,200 lb mammoth-slaying short-faced bear! :eek:

The plight of the polar bear is particularly tragic.
3.4m tall and 2200 lbs!
 

Hitman

Legend
Greetings, boys!

Today's beast with the least... challengers... is the...

SHORT-FACED BEAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!





Standing 12 feet tall, with a vertical arm reach of 14 feet, and weighing in at well over a ton, the Terror of the Pleistocene must have been a positively nightmarish prospect for creatures unfortunate enough to cross its path. :oops:
Interesting...I'll need to read up about this one. :cool:
 
3.4m tall and 2200 lbs!
Image from your source:



At any rate, all savage creatures welcome here!

God love their contemporaries!
 

Hitman

Legend
A polar bear can get that big. And they are usually hungry. Watched an episode of Planet Earth last week where the polar bears hunted beluga whales twice their size by springing into the water and grabbing them by the neck. The bear then drags the whale onto the ice to feed its young’uns.
Polar bears I think are the most aggressive of all the bears purely because of the lack of food in the area, so whenever they can see there is a chance to feed, they become very dangerous very fast.
 
There was a fearsome apex predator, boys.

And we are reasonably sure that it was feathered.

Charming songbird it was not!

Hailing from the class of flightless fowl colloquially known as "terror birds"... meet the latest in our series of horrifying hellions:

ANDALGORNIS!!!!!!!!!!!!


Hammer blows from its massive beak typically did in Andalgornis' prey.





Yeah, a crowbar's probably not gonna help you here, boss.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
There was a fearsome apex predator, boys.

And we are reasonably sure that it was feathered.

Charming songbird it was not!

Hailing from the class of flightless fowl colloquially known as "terror birds"... meet the latest in our series of horrifying hellions:

ANDALGORNIS!!!!!!!!!!!!


Hammer blows from its massive beak typically did in Andalgornis' prey.





Yeah, a crowbar's probably not gonna help you here, boss.
Reminds me of the movie Up.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
There was a fearsome apex predator, boys.

And we are reasonably sure that it was feathered.

Charming songbird it was not!

Hailing from the class of flightless fowl colloquially known as "terror birds"... meet the latest in our series of horrifying hellions:

ANDALGORNIS!!!!!!!!!!!!


Hammer blows from its massive beak typically did in Andalgornis' prey.





Yeah, a crowbar's probably not gonna help you here, boss.
Also reminds me of a road-trip I took in southern Africa back in the late ‘90s. Most animals steer clear of your car, and ignore you when your window is rolled down. But there was one exception (not counting pissed-off oliphants). These curious tall 2-legged critters would stick their hungry giant heads into the window:

 
Also reminds me of a road-trip I took in southern Africa back in the late ‘90s. Most animals steer clear of your car, and ignore you when your window is rolled down. But there was one exception. These curious tall 2-legged critters would stick their hungry giant heads into the window:

Wild.

The intelligence of avian species is remarkable to me.
 

BlueB

Legend
...the extraordinary senses (e.g., detecting a drop of blood in the water from a quarter-mile away)...
This was debunked. Just other day my son has showed me a tube video where they were experimenting with this.
But really, you don't even need a research, just common sense. For any crearure to smell something, those molecules need to get to the nose. Now, how molecules from a droplet of blood get transported trough water, over a 1/4 mile?

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
 

tonylg

Hall of Fame
Also reminds me of a road-trip I took in southern Africa back in the late ‘90s. Most animals steer clear of your car, and ignore you when your window is rolled down. But there was one exception (not counting pissed-off oliphants). These curious tall 2-legged critters would stick their hungry giant heads into the window:

I see your ground hornbill and present the cassowary. I came face to face with one of these while walking through the rainforest.

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
You are paddleboarding next to 15 great white sharks! - CA police warn beachgoers

Great white sharks swim among us at San Diego County beaches
The young predators are generally more interested in stingrays than you

By DEBORAH SULLIVAN BRENNAN
AUG. 1, 2020


DEL MAR —
On a cloudy morning Wednesday, shark researchers from Cal State Long Beach followed a young white shark as it wound its way along the shore off Del Mar.

Using a drone to spot the animal and an inflatable boat to follow it, they traced the shark’s path across the rocky reef as it darted past surfers waiting in the lineup.

The footage they captured didn’t represent a rare appearance of the ocean predator among beachgoers, but an everyday occurrence on the Southern California coastline. White sharks, known popularly as “Great Whites,” are regular visitors that share the sea with us daily, new studies are finding.

Classic horror films notwithstanding, juvenile white sharks glide every day among surfers, swimmers and paddle-boarders, generally without incident.

Most sharks found off Southern California beaches aren’t behemoths like those featured on “Shark Week,” or “Deep Blue” the massive female recorded on video off Guadalupe Island in Mexico. White sharks can grow to 20 feet or more, according to a NOAA species profile, and live up to 70 years, Lowe said. Those close to shore, however, are typically juveniles ranging from newborn to several years old: “babies” or “toddler sharks,” as researchers Rex and James Anderson of Shark Lab refer to them.

The young sharks are usually about four to nine feet long, they said, and likely seek shallow waters for heat, food and protection. Sharks are cold-blooded, and rely on the environment to maintain their body temperature. So younger ones, with smaller body mass, gravitate to warmer water. That’s also a better bet for juvenile sharks that haven’t yet learned to hunt marine mammals.

“The most abundant food source and easiest for them to catch is stingrays,” Lowe said. “We have lots of stingrays in our water.”They may also select shallow water to avoid adult white sharks, which will happily eat their young. Given that, the young sharks are often hungry and skittish.

Surfers lined up along the low waves, distance swimmers paddled to an outer buoy, and kids splashed at the water’s edge. For several hours, Rex piloted the drone over the site, seeking a quick, dark shape in the surf. Dolphins surfaced in the waves, and sea lions worked the line behind the breakers, hunting for fish. Rex paid close attention to that zone; the sharks often follow the same route just beyond the crashing waves.

“It’s scary to think of white sharks being out there, but it actually means that we’re making good choices from a marine management perspective, and the population is recovering,” she said.

What does this mean for humans? Potentially fewer stingrays, for one thing, as young sharks gobble them up. Might we also be meals for hungry sharks?

“We’re definitely not on their menu,” Lowe said. “We know that. That is well-determined globally. We know that people are occasionally bitten. And one of the theories is they mistake us for prey. Another idea is they might bite when they’re threatened, to defend themselves.”

Through drone flights, Lowe, Rex and colleagues are counting the number of surfers, swimmers, stand-up paddleboarders, boogy-boarders and waders, to analyze and predict encounters with sharks.

“So far, what we’ve seen is the sharks don’t really care,” Rex said. “They don’t pay attention to people. Unless the person gets too close, and then they usually just startle and swim away. We have not documented any aggressive behavior from a juvenile white shark to a person.”
https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/environment/story/2020-08-01/white-sharks-swim-among-us-at-san-diego-beaches
 
Evening, boys.

While perhaps not the largest or nastiest of the bunch, these beasts are more relevant than ever.

News has broken that a specimen of Ursus spelaeus has been discovered nearly intact in the Russian arctic.

Bet this snout-tickler is glad that it's been frozen for nearly 40,000 years! :oops:




The cave bear depicted here got out while the gettin' was good.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Evening, boys.

While perhaps not the largest or nastiest of the bunch, these beasts are more relevant than ever.

News has broken that a specimen of Ursus spelaeus has been discovered nearly intact in the Russian arctic.

Bet this snout-tickler is glad that it's been frozen for nearly 40,000 years! :oops:




The cave bear depicted here got out while the gettin' was good.
Today's Los Angeles Times had an article about the preserved Ice Age cave bear.

WORLD & NATION
Perfectly preserved Ice Age cave bear found in Arctic Russia
SEP. 15, 2020
12:22 AM


Reindeer herders in a Russian Arctic archipelago have found an immaculately preserved carcass of an Ice Age cave bear, researchers said Monday.

The find — revealed as permafrost melts across vast areas of Siberia — was discovered on the Lyakhovsky Islands with its teeth and even its nose intact.

Previously, scientists only had been able to discover the bones of cave bears that became extinct 15,000 years ago.

Scientists of the North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk, the premier center for research into woolly mammoths and other prehistoric species, hailed the find as groundbreaking.

In a statement issued by the university, researcher Lena Grigorieva emphasized that “this is the first and only find of its kind — a whole bear carcass with soft tissues.”

He added, “It is completely preserved, with all internal organs in place, including even its nose. This find is of great importance for the whole world.”

A preliminary analysis indicated that the adult bear lived 22,000 to 39,500 years ago.

“It is necessary to carry out radiocarbon analysis to determine the precise age of the bear,” the university quoted researcher Maxim Cheprasov as saying.

The bear carcass was found by reindeer herders on Bolshoy Lyakhovsky Island. It is the largest of the Lyakhovsky Islands, which are part of the New Siberian Islands archipelago that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

At about the same time, a well-preserved carcass of a cave bear cub was also found in another area in Yakutia’s mainland, the university said. It didn’t describe its condition in detail but noted that scientists were hopeful of obtaining its DNA.

Recent years have seen major discoveries of mammoths, woolly rhinos, Ice Age foals, several puppies and cave lion cubs as the permafrost melts.
https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2020-09-15/perfectly-preserved-ice-age-cave-bear-found-in-arctic-russia
 
Today's Los Angeles Times had an article about the preserved Ice Age cave bear.

WORLD & NATION
Perfectly preserved Ice Age cave bear found in Arctic Russia
SEP. 15, 2020
12:22 AM


Reindeer herders in a Russian Arctic archipelago have found an immaculately preserved carcass of an Ice Age cave bear, researchers said Monday.

The find — revealed as permafrost melts across vast areas of Siberia — was discovered on the Lyakhovsky Islands with its teeth and even its nose intact.

Previously, scientists only had been able to discover the bones of cave bears that became extinct 15,000 years ago.

Scientists of the North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk, the premier center for research into woolly mammoths and other prehistoric species, hailed the find as groundbreaking.

In a statement issued by the university, researcher Lena Grigorieva emphasized that “this is the first and only find of its kind — a whole bear carcass with soft tissues.”

He added, “It is completely preserved, with all internal organs in place, including even its nose. This find is of great importance for the whole world.”

A preliminary analysis indicated that the adult bear lived 22,000 to 39,500 years ago.

“It is necessary to carry out radiocarbon analysis to determine the precise age of the bear,” the university quoted researcher Maxim Cheprasov as saying.

The bear carcass was found by reindeer herders on Bolshoy Lyakhovsky Island. It is the largest of the Lyakhovsky Islands, which are part of the New Siberian Islands archipelago that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

At about the same time, a well-preserved carcass of a cave bear cub was also found in another area in Yakutia’s mainland, the university said. It didn’t describe its condition in detail but noted that scientists were hopeful of obtaining its DNA.

Recent years have seen major discoveries of mammoths, woolly rhinos, Ice Age foals, several puppies and cave lion cubs as the permafrost melts.
https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2020-09-15/perfectly-preserved-ice-age-cave-bear-found-in-arctic-russia
Similar revelations can only become more routine with the accelerating melting of permafrost.

Will be interesting to me to see how paleontologists put this bounty of information to use.
 
Well apparently possible evidence of life on Venus now...
Amazing to think about how many unknowns still remain. Every generation views the previous one as frightfully primitive in terms of its comprehension of life, the universe, etc.

Imagine that we may ourselves be rendered veritable cavemen... within our own lives.

The knowledge base is growing exponentially at this point.
 

tonylg

Hall of Fame
Saw this thread bumped up and thought it may have been because of a sad event here last week.

A guy was killed by what is thought to have been a great white at one of my favourite beaches. First fatal attack in the area in about 60 years, but still quite scary.
 
Saw this thread bumped up and thought it may have been because of a sad event here last week.

A guy was killed by what is thought to have been a great white at one of my favourite beaches. First fatal attack in the area in about 60 years, but still quite scary.
For me, one of the most terrifying shark attack anecdotes remains the rogue shark that killed a kid swimming in a New Jersey creek over a century ago.
 

tonylg

Hall of Fame
For me, one of the most terrifying shark attack anecdotes remains the rogue shark that killed a kid swimming in a New Jersey creek over a century ago.
I was surfing the exact spot this guy was in only 2 days earlier. Although it's now probably the safest spot in Australia (authorities looking for the shark), I'll still feel weird next time I'm in there.
 
I was surfing the exact spot this guy was in only 2 days earlier. Although it's now probably the safest spot in Australia (authorities looking for the shark), I'll still feel weird next time I'm in there.
Yikes.

I belly-surfed in shark breeding waters (unbeknownst to me at the time) as a kid.

Never got the full scoop on fatalities, though. Glad you're okay.
 

tonylg

Hall of Fame
Yikes.

I belly-surfed in shark breeding waters (unbeknownst to me at the time) as a kid.

Never got the full scoop on fatalities, though. Glad you're okay.
The rational side of me knows that we are more likely to win lotto, in fact far more likely to be killed driving to the beach .. but I'll still be watching my kids like a hawk this weekend.
 
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