Always keep your side clear of balls or it may cost you eventually.

davced1

Hall of Fame
Played a competitive match without ball boys so we had to pick up the balls ourselves. As usual I didn't waste time to pick up every ball off the court after a 1st serve error and this time I payed for it. In a close 1st set that felt it was about to turn either way a ball that I surely would have hit bounced off a stray ball and gave me no chance. My opponent accordingly to the rule that it is each players responsibility to keep his side clear of balls claimed the point and it was an important point too. It was the first time it happened to me in match play but from now on I will take no chances. I will pick up every lose ball no matter how time consuming it is.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Lost point is of course a consequence to learn from ... but all you have to do is watch one person go down, shattering an elbow on the landing, and you will never leave a ball on the court again.
 

davced1

Hall of Fame
Lost point is of course a consequence to learn from ... but all you have to do is watch one person go down, shattering an elbow on the landing, and you will never leave a ball on the court again.
That is very bad luck. I leave plenty of balls on the court when I practice like most people do. Maybe not a good habit.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I have never seen anyone trip on a ball or a ball hit another ball. These must be rare occurrences. I've seen people trip and fall numerous times simply by just catching their feet. I've seen people sprain ACL's. I've seen people get hit in the eye (off a couple ricochets not direct hits). But never seen a ball on the court cause a problem.

Yet people get fanatic about balls on the court as if this is a major hazard. Sure I clear balls in the middle of the court. But anything back behind me or near the net is left alone. I'm not going to be sprinting in those locations so I'm unlikely to step in a ball. All other foot movements are shuffle steps for me that would merely kick the ball around.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
See the ball; be distracted by the ball.

I clear all balls off the court. I don't even like it when the ball is resting at the bottom of the net after a fault serve...
 

esgee48

Legend
The groups I play with all clear the balls towards the net's base or back to the baseline wall. All court tennis is dangerous enough chasing down balls and having sudden changes in direction. If you play mainly baseline, which I don't, then balls near the base of the net would not bother me.

I actually see incoming balls strike balls lying on the court frequently, like once a month. If you do not clear a ball, we and my opponents will hit towards that ball because it will distract you as you see it bounce. Even if you are a baseliner, you can be bought to the net with a short ball aimed at a ball lying inside the service line. This is mid 4.5-4.5+ level tennis though and YMMV.
 
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OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
I have never seen anyone trip on a ball or a ball hit another ball. These must be rare occurrences. I've seen people trip and fall numerous times simply by just catching their feet. I've seen people sprain ACL's. I've seen people get hit in the eye (off a couple ricochets not direct hits). But never seen a ball on the court cause a problem.

Yet people get fanatic about balls on the court as if this is a major hazard. Sure I clear balls in the middle of the court. But anything back behind me or near the net is left alone. I'm not going to be sprinting in those locations so I'm unlikely to step in a ball. All other foot movements are shuffle steps for me that would merely kick the ball around.
I've only seen it once with the big injury was in a match, I was waiting for the court. Guy served, faulted into the net, ball rolled back and he left it. Windy day so ball migrated ... I don't know how he didn't see it when it was in NML on the Ad side ... he was moving to the left to get to a wide shot .... it was not pretty.

Me personally, I don't want anything on the court itself ... we have regular winds and balls will move from where they start. If it is tucked back by the fence I am okay with those.

Plus, I am easily distracted .... I want to be thinking about my shot on the ball in play, I don't want to see or think about a ball that is not in play.
 

blakesq

Hall of Fame
I generally don’t clear balls that are laying against the net or within 0 to 3 feet of the net. My thinking is if it’s that close and a ball hits it, I had no chance anyhow, or if I run up to net I can kick the ball to the side away from me. What do you do you all think about this?
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
I generally don’t clear balls that are laying against the net or within 0 to 3 feet of the net. My thinking is if it’s that close and a ball hits it, I had no chance anyhow, or if I run up to net I can kick the ball to the side away from me. What do you do you all think about this?
Personally, I think it is foolish. Either you are giving up what could be an easy put away at net OR you are distracting yourself by attempting to kick the leftover ball.

Just pick it up
 

Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
I don't want to see my opponent's loose balls during a point as that is distracting and I don't want to step on my balls. I did roll my ankle once.

Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
 
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Cashman

Hall of Fame
But never seen a ball on the court cause a problem.

Yet people get fanatic about balls on the court as if this is a major hazard.
Once you’ve seen someone do an ankle on a ball (or done it yourself) you get quite particular about it - if only for the peace of mind.

I want to be able to run around the court without having to give any thought to the possibility of stepping on a ball - regardless of how unlikely it is.
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
Once you’ve seen someone do an ankle on a ball (or done it yourself) you get quite particular about it - if only for the peace of mind.

I want to be able to run around the court without having to give any thought to the possibility of stepping on a ball - regardless of how unlikely it is.
Same here. After seeing my practice partner sidelined for 2 months from stepping on a ball, i ALWAYS clear my side.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
Once you’ve seen someone do an ankle on a ball (or done it yourself) you get quite particular about it - if only for the peace of mind.

I want to be able to run around the court without having to give any thought to the possibility of stepping on a ball - regardless of how unlikely it is.
like (y)
 

AtTheNet

New User
I once stepped on a ball near the net and rolled my ankle pretty badly. Did not result in a serious sprain or loss of playing time, but it hurt like hell and brought home the point that there is no good result of loose balls on the court. During drills at my club, balls tend to collect near the net--when I rotate onto the court, those balls all get sent to the back curtain where they are well out of the way.

However, I will freely admit that the older a player gets, the more conscious one gets about the hazards of loose balls on the court.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
When I was 9, I saw my uncle step on a ball and break his foot. It was pretty gruesome. Balls on the court area make me paranoid.
 
Played a competitive match without ball boys so we had to pick up the balls ourselves. As usual I didn't waste time to pick up every ball off the court after a 1st serve error and this time I payed for it. In a close 1st set that felt it was about to turn either way a ball that I surely would have hit bounced off a stray ball and gave me no chance. My opponent accordingly to the rule that it is each players responsibility to keep his side clear of balls claimed the point and it was an important point too. It was the first time it happened to me in match play but from now on I will take no chances. I will pick up every lose ball no matter how time consuming it is.
Happened to me recently to hit a stray 1st serve ball on my opponent's half. It didn't cross my mind to ask for the point tho. I do pick balls on my half except ones that stay really close to the net, but people are usually very lazy about it in my experience.
 

davced1

Hall of Fame
Happened to me recently to hit a stray 1st serve ball on my opponent's half. It didn't cross my mind to ask for the point tho. I do pick balls on my half except ones that stay really close to the net, but people are usually very lazy about it in my experience.
It's in the rules so I can't blame him. It was an important point when the 1st set was about to turn either way. I used to be lazy about it but this time it may have cost me the set so not anymore.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Practice I might let balls stay, but I make sure everything is clear during matches. I have had opponents get upset and refuse to clear a ball on their side when I asked, and then watched them have to dance around it when I maybe hit to that area to make them play around it. There's no reason to leave balls on court really. Just push them to the fences or off to the sides.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
First off, I'm in agreement that the court should be cleared of balls before the point is played, however I think a lot of people engage in a lot of gamesmanship with this, and sometimes I have partners that really **** me off about it...

When my dubs partner is serving and faults into the net, I hustle over and pick up the ball if it will be anywhere near "in play" and put it in my pocket and hustle back to my ready position very quickly. I don't feel like I'm asking too much of my dubs partners to do the same.

When opponents are serving, I pick up/catch/hold any errant serve that is reasonable, and if it's wildly out, I glance behind me to make sure it's going to stay on the back fence out of play, or else I hustle over to it and pick it up, and hustle back to my readon position ASAP - again, I don't think it's unreasonable to ask the same of opponents.

I see opponents gaming it all the time though - the opponent will make a show of trying to catch that first fault serve, or try to hit it back, but obviously intentionally boot it around a while... or if it was really long, they'll stand there with their hand up as it rolls along the back fence for 10 seconds and even though it's not going to bounce back towards the court, they won't resume until the thing has come to a complete stop, 30 feet away from them... or the ones that go and chase that wide fault serve that is two courts down now... and lollygag back to ready position and then throw it back over the net to me... and don't offer me another first serve... yeah... I may hit at those people in a future point at the net... just saying...
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
First off, I'm in agreement that the court should be cleared of balls before the point is played, however I think a lot of people engage in a lot of gamesmanship with this, and sometimes I have partners that really **** me off about it...

When my dubs partner is serving and faults into the net, I hustle over and pick up the ball if it will be anywhere near "in play" and put it in my pocket and hustle back to my ready position very quickly. I don't feel like I'm asking too much of my dubs partners to do the same.

When opponents are serving, I pick up/catch/hold any errant serve that is reasonable, and if it's wildly out, I glance behind me to make sure it's going to stay on the back fence out of play, or else I hustle over to it and pick it up, and hustle back to my readon position ASAP - again, I don't think it's unreasonable to ask the same of opponents.

I see opponents gaming it all the time though - the opponent will make a show of trying to catch that first fault serve, or try to hit it back, but obviously intentionally boot it around a while... or if it was really long, they'll stand there with their hand up as it rolls along the back fence for 10 seconds and even though it's not going to bounce back towards the court, they won't resume until the thing has come to a complete stop, 30 feet away from them... or the ones that go and chase that wide fault serve that is two courts down now... and lollygag back to ready position and then throw it back over the net to me... and don't offer me another first serve... yeah... I may hit at those people in a future point at the net... just saying...
Totally agree on most of your points.

I always pick up a netted ball if I am server's partner ... I do it as quickly as possible.

If I am receiving a long/wide serve ... I tend to pocket it (skirt it) quickly ... or let it go past to fence if I cannot reasonably contain it quickly. I do not under any circumstances intentionally hit back to the server a faulted serve. (on some particularly fast serves I may be returning while partner is calling it long ... but I try not to do this if I can reasonably avoid it)

HOWEVER, if there is a ball that has ricocheted off the side fence and is dribbling around .... I do make certain it has come to a safe stand still. I play on many courts which do not have a huge area behind the baseline and the fence and in an area with high winds ... with wind, balls travel.

If a ball has been put into an adjacent court ... it can stay there until point/game is over .... if there is undue fuss and time then offer a 1st serve.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
HOWEVER, if there is a ball that has ricocheted off the side fence and is dribbling around .... I do make certain it has come to a safe stand still. I play on many courts which do not have a huge area behind the baseline and the fence and in an area with high winds ... with wind, balls travel.
I can give you this one in some cases - it can be a judgement call for sure...
 

R1FF

Professional
Once you’ve seen someone do an ankle on a ball (or done it yourself) you get quite particular about it - if only for the peace of mind.

I want to be able to run around the court without having to give any thought to the possibility of stepping on a ball - regardless of how unlikely it is.
Humans are weird.

We’ve all driven by a car accident on the freeway. So we all wear seatbelts religiously “just in case”.

Meanwhile, using your phone while driving is “guaranteed” to be a distraction and yet everyone still does it.

People will take big precautions for the most rare & asinine ”what if’s” of the world but never consider avoiding the guarantees.

I never move the ball (guaranteed distraction) when the odds of losing a point or ankle are so low. I just cant rationalize prioritizing behavior around the least likely outcome.
 
Well, it's a zero cost precaution. You're in between points anyways, so just pick up the ball.
There is literally no downside, and only upside (eliminate .000001% chance of injury, plus extra rest)
so it's actually perfectly rational. You seem to be referring to picking up a ball mid-point, which is a moot point

I actually saw a pro ATP player/coach during practice allow a ball to sit on the baseline for several volley returns today
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
Meanwhile, using your phone while driving is “guaranteed” to be a distraction and yet everyone still does it.
Speak for yourself.

I never move the ball (guaranteed distraction) when the odds of losing a point or ankle are so low. I just cant rationalize prioritizing behavior around the least likely outcome.
It’s not really much effort in exchange for a safer playing environment. The odds of stepping on a ball are low, but they’re not THAT low. Play long enough with people who don’t clear the court and you will eventually see it happen.
 
A coach was feeding volleys to a player.
They would play 5-10 balls per volley rally, as pros tend to do.
One rolled slowly back towards the baseline,
and I could not believe the coach kept hitting knowing the ball was rolling near her feet.
When the live ball was dead, she then picked up the errant ball
 

R1FF

Professional
To each their own.

When Im drilling, I’ll move the ball if it concerns me as a legitimate threat. I absolutely hate it when the person/coach feeding me balls stops the drill to warn me about a ball. I already know it’s there. It’s not a problem. I want to stay focused on the drill at hand I’ll pick up the balls or move them when it’s time to do so. Until then, just keep feeding me balls & instruction. Even if it is liveball.

Breaking my concentration to move balls is a bigger distraction than playing around them (for the most part). But that’s just me.
 

R1FF

Professional
Speak for yourself.


It’s not really much effort in exchange for a safer playing environment. The odds of stepping on a ball are low, but they’re not THAT low. Play long enough with people who don’t clear the court and you will eventually see it happen.
I see most players drinking gatorade (or some other sugar sports drink). Guaranteed insulin spike & diabetes threat. As in, 100% of the time it is a unhealthy decision to do such behavior.

I chose to learn from that behavior and avoid it.

Whereas in 2-3 yrs of playing I’ve never seen an ankle rolled from a random ball. (Doesn’t mean leaving the ball isn’t a “risk”). But the sugar in the sports drink does more inflammatory damage (cumulative) than the 0.00000001% chance of an ankle roll. Especially over time, and combined with how the avg American eats off the court. Worried about low-risk potential ankle roll yet after the match heads to bar to drink beers which literally have label that warns of high cancer risk. It’s odd to me.

Im not saying anyone is wrong for playing it safe by moving the ball. Im just noting the subjectivity in which safeguards are taken. An alternative perspective if you will.

Another example... I race motocross. Any weight you can shed from a dirtbike makes it perform exponentially better. You will see some people spend $2000 on just titanium bolts that will save about 8 ounces of weight to a 225 lb dirtbike. It’s a trivial anount of weight. Spend $20k and you can lose about 4-6lbs off a bike thru various lightweight parts.

Or just stop drinking beer & eating fast food and most riders would lose 30-50 lbs off their waistline AND instantly become better athletes, live longer, and save a boatload on medical bills down the road. Oh, and save that $20k.

I realize Im the minority in looking at the scenarios and feeling like most people take illogical approach. If safety is the goal, I’d go after the low hanging fruit. Odds are, in America, the risk of diabetes or heart disease or cancer are far greater than rolling an ankle.
 

R1FF

Professional
Another real example...

My wife stepped into the UPS store for literally 30 seconds to grab our mail last week. Parked right in front she left our car running, AC on, doors locked, baby in carseat inside.

Another mom saw this and was about to call the cops. Meanwhile standing next to her was her child holding a 32 oz soda.

From my perspective what my wife did was a calculated risk of extreme improbability of anything going wrong.

I found it laughable, and indicative of our culture, that someone else would chastise her while their own kid was drinking a soda that nobody in their right mind should be drinking let alone that amount of sugar being given to a 75 lb human. I think it’s insane that the low probability behavior is frowned upon so heavily meanwhile the drug abuse (yes, sugar is a highly addictive & damaging drug) doesnt even so much register as anything but “normal” in our society.

But again, I realize I view the world thru an uncommon lens.
 

Pitti

Rookie
I clear balls every single point. I put them in my pocket or near the fence. As a kid I tripped twice with the balls at the floor, and once I hit myself hard and the other time I injured my wrist for a month. Also, never play in a frozen court. I’ve done so, and while it’s funny and you can slide à la Roland Garros, you are begging to injure yourself. It was the silliest way in which I broke a bone in my wrist (the same wrist that got injured by the ball tripping some years before). I think I’m more mature now. I think...
 

chatt_town

Hall of Fame
I have never seen anyone trip on a ball or a ball hit another ball. These must be rare occurrences. I've seen people trip and fall numerous times simply by just catching their feet. I've seen people sprain ACL's. I've seen people get hit in the eye (off a couple ricochets not direct hits). But never seen a ball on the court cause a problem.

Yet people get fanatic about balls on the court as if this is a major hazard. Sure I clear balls in the middle of the court. But anything back behind me or near the net is left alone. I'm not going to be sprinting in those locations so I'm unlikely to step in a ball. All other foot movements are shuffle steps for me that would merely kick the ball around.
It's funny how people change over the years. Wife and I started in 2002-2003. All of a sudden she doesn't even want a ball at the net. I've tried to explain to her you can't stop someone's serve between 1st and second to get a missed serve from the net. She doesn't see anything wrong with it but it bothers everyone else and understandably so. I do rid the court of balls sitting in the service box though. Too many guys hit drop shots and I'm not taking any chances of rolling my ankle. Turned 50 last year and **** hurts for absolutely no reason now. :) I'm not going to let a ball do damage. My left shoulder is hurting from basically sleeping wrong(thank God I'm right handed and play with a 1hbh). Yea, clear the balls brother/sister.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
I see most players drinking gatorade (or some other sugar sports drink). Guaranteed insulin spike & diabetes threat. As in, 100% of the time it is a unhealthy decision to do such behavior.

I chose to learn from that behavior and avoid it.

Whereas in 2-3 yrs of playing I’ve never seen an ankle rolled from a random ball. (Doesn’t mean leaving the ball isn’t a “risk”). But the sugar in the sports drink does more inflammatory damage (cumulative) than the 0.00000001% chance of an ankle roll. Especially over time, and combined with how the avg American eats off the court. Worried about low-risk potential ankle roll yet after the match heads to bar to drink beers which literally have label that warns of high cancer risk. It’s odd to me.

Im not saying anyone is wrong for playing it safe by moving the ball. Im just noting the subjectivity in which safeguards are taken. An alternative perspective if you will.

Another example... I race motocross. Any weight you can shed from a dirtbike makes it perform exponentially better. You will see some people spend $2000 on just titanium bolts that will save about 8 ounces of weight to a 225 lb dirtbike. It’s a trivial anount of weight. Spend $20k and you can lose about 4-6lbs off a bike thru various lightweight parts.

Or just stop drinking beer & eating fast food and most riders would lose 30-50 lbs off their waistline AND instantly become better athletes, live longer, and save a boatload on medical bills down the road. Oh, and save that $20k.

I realize Im the minority in looking at the scenarios and feeling like most people take illogical approach. If safety is the goal, I’d go after the low hanging fruit. Odds are, in America, the risk of diabetes or heart disease or cancer are far greater than rolling an ankle.
These are all fairly specious comparisons.
 

R1FF

Professional
These are all fairly specious comparisons.
Cite how & why?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. 1 in 4 die from it. The cause is a very poor diet.

25% of tennis players do not roll their ankle from stepping on a tennis ball. The odds of actually stepping on a ball and rolling an ankle are immeasurably low.

The fact that people are so worried about one (ankle roll) and not remotely the other (heart disease) is indeed asinine.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
Stepping on a tennis ball is a somewhat low probability situation (for the most part), and it results in an immediate high potential for short-term injury (sprained ankle, stumble and get a strawberry on your knee/elbow), lower potential for longer term or even tennis-ending injury (injured ACL, torn tendons in ankle/feet/legs, bruised coccyx, broken limb from falling, concussion, etc.) and a potential for lost work, medical bills, etc. Of course, we all also accept some risks of these sorts of injuries just by getting out of bed in the morning and those risks go up greatly when we step onto a tennis court.

Certainly eating unhealthily presents risks in the long term and maybe even immediate risks in the short term, depending on your individual situation, but it's not really the same thing. Cumulative effects of poor diet/nutrition choices certainly increase the risk, and people would do well to consider these and make appropriate choices. The thing is though that it's not at all comparable to the simple act of removing a hazard from the court in a tennis match due to the effort involved and the immediate vs. long term potential effects.

Using the fact that one person drinks a sports drink (and really, would you be happy if they drank anything but water?) to ignore reasonable advice about removing immediate potential dangers from the playing surface is classic "whataboutism".

I hate my serve rhythm to be interrupted as much or more than anyone, but sometimes it's just part of the game, that's the way it goes. This is why you need to establish a pre-serve routine and stick to it and be able to reset yourself if something interrupts. In baseball, batters would often call "time" while I was in the middle of my pre-pitch routine (not often but occasionally when I was in the windup too) and of course they would do it to rattle me, but I had a routine that I did every time, and so it never rattled me. Serving a tennis ball is the same... if I see you are serving and are leaving a netted first serve on the court and going into your second serve routine without picking it up, I'm going to hold you up and tell you to clear the first serve laying on the court - I'll do this ESPECIALLY for the gamesmanship of it, because if you're so easily rattled that you can't interrupt your routine and you'd leave a ball on the court when you're about to play a point, oh man, I'm going to town on that! And guess what - it's in the code:

TheCode said:
42. Retrieving stray balls. Each player is responsible for removing stray balls and other objects from the player’s end of the court. Whenever a ball is not in play, a player must honor an opponent’s request to remove a ball from the court or from an area outside the court that is reasonably close to the lines. A player shall not go behind an adjacent court to retrieve a ball or ask a player on an adjacent court to return a ball while a point is in play. When a player returns a ball from an adjacent court, the player shall wait until the point is over on the court where the ball is being returned and then return it directly to one of the players, preferably the server.
This includes removing a netted first serve that remains on the court or reasonably close to the lines.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
Another real example...

My wife stepped into the UPS store for literally 30 seconds to grab our mail last week. Parked right in front she left our car running, AC on, doors locked, baby in carseat inside.

Another mom saw this and was about to call the cops. Meanwhile standing next to her was her child holding a 32 oz soda.

From my perspective what my wife did was a calculated risk of extreme improbability of anything going wrong.

I found it laughable, and indicative of our culture, that someone else would chastise her while their own kid was drinking a soda that nobody in their right mind should be drinking let alone that amount of sugar being given to a 75 lb human. I think it’s insane that the low probability behavior is frowned upon so heavily meanwhile the drug abuse (yes, sugar is a highly addictive & damaging drug) doesnt even so much register as anything but “normal” in our society.

But again, I realize I view the world thru an uncommon lens.
See, I get that what your wife did was not a big risk to your child, and also that what the other woman was doing was her being a busybody - but don't you live in California? Out in Cali, isn't everything anyone else does everyone else's business? You make it your business to object to all the dietary choices of people around you, why are you so bent when this woman made it her business to worry about and object to the potential danger your wife put your child in?

Further, parking right in front of the store, with the car running, even for 30 seconds, is basically thumbing your nose to everyone else who parked in a parking space. You're saying, in essence, that you shouldn't have to abide by the rules that everyone else has to abide by, because of reasons... why be part of the problem?

Sure it's a pain to get the baby out of and then back into the car seat and carry them into the store, and struggle to carry the mail/packages along with the baby, but again, that's "part of the game". What if that 30 second trip became something where the person behind the desk couldn't find the package immediately, or if there was a package slip in your box inside, and now that 30 seconds is taking 10 minutes... maybe you think you'd say to the attendant "oh hold on, I'm parked, idling right outside, let me go move into a parking spot and get the kid and I'll be back" but you see that 6 other people (who all parked in regular spaces like they're supposed to, and had to walk around your parked car in front of the building, witnessing your child locked inside of it) just came in and are standing in line behind you and you know you'll have to go the end of that line if you leave now... and there's only one attendant so your 30 second trip will become two trips, and will take 30 minutes... so instead, you stay there for 10 minutes... parked in front of the store, not in a space, car idling, AC running, child locked inside... and during that time, maybe there's a problem in the parking lot with some people trying to leave and others trying to park but they can't both get around your car, so it becomes a big clusterfk while some cars reverse, others go "the long way" around the parking lot... and now that woman oversugaring her kid HAS called the cops because she sat there for 10 minutes, not knowing where you were, and only worrying about the safety of your child... meanwhile, you've also just delayed however many other peoples' day who might have another dozen errands to do, that if each one of their errands includes a couple minute delay, their schedule will push them out into doing these errands during rush hour, which will double their errand running time... and all because you didn't want to delay your own day... is that fair?

Yes, I'm making an extreme example out of this, and you know I'm not trying to break your personal stones about it, but I'm just saying that everyone has their own sh*t going on... our place is not to judge. Our place is to just do what we can in order to not be one of the inconsiderate masses out there fking it all up... God knows there are enough of those clowns out there already.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
If I have momentum, I'll often leave balls in locations unlikely to cause me a problem.

If they have momentum, I'm clearing more balls.
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
I have never seen anyone trip on a ball or a ball hit another ball.
I have seen more ball on ball violence than I can count. And several times the bounce off was good enough to maintain the rally. This spring my dog ran across the court (about the serve line) and my buddy hit the dog on the back, ball bounced perfectly to me and the rally continued. Dog was not even bothered because my buddy is a 4.0. Good thing he isn't a 3.5 or it woulda been curtains for Teddy.
 

darkhorse

Semi-Pro
If my opponent leaves a ball on his side of the net near the service line, I almost always try to hit it with my service return. Not a high success rate but it's pretty funny when it does happen
 

R1FF

Professional
See, I get that what your wife did was not a big risk to your child, and also that what the other woman was doing was her being a busybody - but don't you live in California? Out in Cali, isn't everything anyone else does everyone else's business? You make it your business to object to all the dietary choices of people around you, why are you so bent when this woman made it her business to worry about and object to the potential danger your wife put your child in?

Further, parking right in front of the store, with the car running, even for 30 seconds, is basically thumbing your nose to everyone else who parked in a parking space. You're saying, in essence, that you shouldn't have to abide by the rules that everyone else has to abide by, because of reasons... why be part of the problem?

Sure it's a pain to get the baby out of and then back into the car seat and carry them into the store, and struggle to carry the mail/packages along with the baby, but again, that's "part of the game". What if that 30 second trip became something where the person behind the desk couldn't find the package immediately, or if there was a package slip in your box inside, and now that 30 seconds is taking 10 minutes... maybe you think you'd say to the attendant "oh hold on, I'm parked, idling right outside, let me go move into a parking spot and get the kid and I'll be back" but you see that 6 other people (who all parked in regular spaces like they're supposed to, and had to walk around your parked car in front of the building, witnessing your child locked inside of it) just came in and are standing in line behind you and you know you'll have to go the end of that line if you leave now... and there's only one attendant so your 30 second trip will become two trips, and will take 30 minutes... so instead, you stay there for 10 minutes... parked in front of the store, not in a space, car idling, AC running, child locked inside... and during that time, maybe there's a problem in the parking lot with some people trying to leave and others trying to park but they can't both get around your car, so it becomes a big clusterfk while some cars reverse, others go "the long way" around the parking lot... and now that woman oversugaring her kid HAS called the cops because she sat there for 10 minutes, not knowing where you were, and only worrying about the safety of your child... meanwhile, you've also just delayed however many other peoples' day who might have another dozen errands to do, that if each one of their errands includes a couple minute delay, their schedule will push them out into doing these errands during rush hour, which will double their errand running time... and all because you didn't want to delay your own day... is that fair?

Yes, I'm making an extreme example out of this, and you know I'm not trying to break your personal stones about it, but I'm just saying that everyone has their own sh*t going on... our place is not to judge. Our place is to just do what we can in order to not be one of the inconsiderate masses out there fking it all up... God knows there are enough of those clowns out there already.
She was in a parking space.

I harshly judge people’s dietary habits for two reasons:

1. Unlike most, im well aware of the damage done from poor nutrition. Most arent. Most dont care. If the kid had a joint in their hand, you wouldn’t think Im being overly judgemental because it’s common that most are conditioned to think that would be egregious parenting. The fact is that soda IS INDEED crazy to give anyone, but if you’re not conditioned to think so or arent aware of the actual effects on the human body, then I will come off as some food ****. In reality, that soda is more harmful than if that kid had been smoking a joint. Not that i would condone either.

2. People tend to think they play it safe in most aspects of life. SAFETY is the core of this topic. Yet the single most impactful threat to anyone’s health is their diet. And people sweep that under the rug because it’s inconvenient.

Im just pointing out the inconsistencies. I am more worried about the high risk/guaranteed threats than the low risk ones.

The difference is that I’ve actually put thought into the risks I take. Most dont. They’re on autopilot. It’s the reason they religiously put on a seatbelt and yet still text while driving.

And yes, it is classic whataboutism. Which doesnt invalidate the analogies. The average American’s are illogical as all getout. That’s not some major stretch.
 

R1FF

Professional
See, I get that what your wife did was not a big risk to your child, and also that what the other woman was doing was her being a busybody - but don't you live in California? Out in Cali, isn't everything anyone else does everyone else's business? You make it your business to object to all the dietary choices of people around you, why are you so bent when this woman made it her business to worry about and object to the potential danger your wife put your child in?

Further, parking right in front of the store, with the car running, even for 30 seconds, is basically thumbing your nose to everyone else who parked in a parking space. You're saying, in essence, that you shouldn't have to abide by the rules that everyone else has to abide by, because of reasons... why be part of the problem?

Sure it's a pain to get the baby out of and then back into the car seat and carry them into the store, and struggle to carry the mail/packages along with the baby, but again, that's "part of the game". What if that 30 second trip became something where the person behind the desk couldn't find the package immediately, or if there was a package slip in your box inside, and now that 30 seconds is taking 10 minutes... maybe you think you'd say to the attendant "oh hold on, I'm parked, idling right outside, let me go move into a parking spot and get the kid and I'll be back" but you see that 6 other people (who all parked in regular spaces like they're supposed to, and had to walk around your parked car in front of the building, witnessing your child locked inside of it) just came in and are standing in line behind you and you know you'll have to go the end of that line if you leave now... and there's only one attendant so your 30 second trip will become two trips, and will take 30 minutes... so instead, you stay there for 10 minutes... parked in front of the store, not in a space, car idling, AC running, child locked inside... and during that time, maybe there's a problem in the parking lot with some people trying to leave and others trying to park but they can't both get around your car, so it becomes a big clusterfk while some cars reverse, others go "the long way" around the parking lot... and now that woman oversugaring her kid HAS called the cops because she sat there for 10 minutes, not knowing where you were, and only worrying about the safety of your child... meanwhile, you've also just delayed however many other peoples' day who might have another dozen errands to do, that if each one of their errands includes a couple minute delay, their schedule will push them out into doing these errands during rush hour, which will double their errand running time... and all because you didn't want to delay your own day... is that fair?

Yes, I'm making an extreme example out of this, and you know I'm not trying to break your personal stones about it, but I'm just saying that everyone has their own sh*t going on... our place is not to judge. Our place is to just do what we can in order to not be one of the inconsiderate masses out there fking it all up... God knows there are enough of those clowns out there already.
And yes, Im in California. Home of the everyone-wants-to-be-in-everyone-else’s-business attitude.

But considering I’ve also lived in hardcore red states, and the bible belt loves telling others how to live, Im inclined to think Cali doesnt have the monopoly on busybody behaviour. It just comes from a different angle.
 
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