American Men's Tennis

I haven't watched the videos, but the USA is a huge nation with a lot of sporting funding and a healthy sporting culture. An American great will rise again.
 

BeatlesFan

Bionic Poster
The USA is a huge nation with a lot of sporting funding and a healthy sporting culture.
And very little interest in young people playing tennis. Look at the public courts, nobody even plays on them anymore. The best American athletes almost always enter different sports and tennis is extremely expensive for parents to afford. Sure, Richard Williams managed on a low income with his two girls, but that was an anomaly. There's absolutely no decent American prospect in the juniors either. Seb Korda is the best bet right now.
 

JackSockIsTheBest

Professional
Here in Hawai'i people take up the courts quite often & you have to wait especially the fact that I have over 50 friends I know from this sport & still meeting new people every week.
 
And very little interest in young people playing tennis. Look at the public courts, nobody even plays on them anymore. The best American athletes almost always enter different sports and tennis is extremely expensive for parents to afford. Sure, Richard Williams managed on a low income with his two girls, but that was an anomaly. There's absolutely no decent American prospect in the juniors either. Seb Korda is the best bet right now.
I'll have to take your word for it because I'm not in the USA. But in a country of 328 million people, there will always be a good chance of one player breaking through and becoming a great competitor, along with the resources available there.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I think the reasons are social in nature.

1. Europe has a secondary school option ending at age 16. Fedalovic all took that option I think. Such people would be considered school dropouts in the US. Turning serious at tennis at age 16 is an option Americans do not have if they still want to be "educated."
2. Europe has a much better social safety net - players don't have to worry about being homeless and without health insurance if their career doesn't take off. This encourages professional risk taking.
 

JackSockIsTheBest

Professional
Quality over quantity... I would rather take 1 or 2 in the top 100 if it's Federer and Wawrinka instead 10 fooders like the french.
That is true since those 2 are very good players (Fed=1/3 Goats), unlike us americans we used to have many powerhouses in the 90s & 80s until the drop after rod which now we have good players just not at the high/GOAT level anymore
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Czech parentage. He was born and raised in Florida and plays for the US.

His father is Petr Korda, the 1998 Australian Open singles champion (b. Rios). His 2 older sisters are both professional golfers.
Yes, I knew that, I only ask questions I have an answer for.
 

Robert F

Professional
I think the reasons are social in nature.

1. Europe has a secondary school option ending at age 16. Fedalovic all took that option I think. Such people would be considered school dropouts in the US. Turning serious at tennis at age 16 is an option Americans do not have if they still want to be "educated."
2. Europe has a much better social safety net - players don't have to worry about being homeless and without health insurance if their career doesn't take off. This encourages professional risk taking.
Agree with #2.

In regards to #1, there are a large group of kids that go to Florida and do "prep" school while training like crazy for tennis. So I think a lot of those players have the same time on court compared to the Europeans. But my guess is in Europe there are many more that use that opportunity, whereas in the US it is almost a privilege where wealthy families can pay for their kids to go to tennis with some school on the side.
 

Swingmaster

Hall of Fame
As an American I still can't even pretend to care. A player's nationality has little bearing on whether I root for them or not in an individual sport.
You’re missing out. I get a slight boost of interest when I flip over to the tennis channel and see an otherwise boring match with a young American in play. I get to pretend to be the Davis Cup captain. “Hmm, this guy is someone I will keep an eye on in the future.” I think Marty Fish is the actual captain. It’s always strange to me when Fish or a previous captain is in attendance to scout a player for the team. Can’t they just watch TV?
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
“Hmm, this guy is someone I will keep an eye on in the future.” I think Marty Fish is the actual captain. It’s always strange to me when Fish or a previous captain is in attendance to scout a player for the team. Can’t they just watch TV?
I think being a Davis Cup Captain is similar to that of a college football coach. Have to recruit the players to play for the U.S. vs. playing in other tournaments for pay. Have to get to know the players individually so you can communicate with them on a personal level and they know the Davis Cup Captain on a personal basics too. Have to ask for their support and have them join the team. I think it will be a very challenging job given the American standing in men's tennis now.
 

TimHenmanATG

Hall of Fame
I think the reasons are social in nature.

1. Europe has a secondary school option ending at age 16. Fedalovic all took that option I think. Such people would be considered school dropouts in the US. Turning serious at tennis at age 16 is an option Americans do not have if they still want to be "educated."
2. Europe has a much better social safety net - players don't have to worry about being homeless and without health insurance if their career doesn't take off. This encourages professional risk taking.
Please stop attempting to compare the USA (a country) with Europe (a continent comprising 50+ countries).

Dziękuję.
 

Swingmaster

Hall of Fame
I think being a Davis Cup Captain is similar to that of a college football coach. Have to recruit the players to play for the U.S. vs. playing in other tournaments for pay. Have to get to know the players individually so you can communicate with them on a personal level and they know the Davis Cup Captain on a personal basics too. Have to ask for their support and have them join the team. I think it will be a very challenging job given the American standing in men's tennis now.
Or maybe it’s a good job since there’s a bunch of similarly capable players to choose from. Better than coaching, say, Japan. “Kei, can you play? No? Then we’re rolling with Taro Daniel.”
“Stefanos, can you play? No? How bout your brother?”
At least the American coach has some fun decisions to make. Isner or Opelka? Fritz or Korda or Tiafoe? Sock for doubles?
 

jussumman

Hall of Fame
Men's we have several explanations as per the video.

US women's tennis and other sports lead the world or near the top usually. No other country provides as much freedom and opportunity to allow women to do what they want, big advantage.
 
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