An injury in my knee

#1
Hi, I am 52 years old and I play tennis since I was 11 years old. For three years ago I had an injury in my knee where the cross-bond on the right knee is cut off. I still train a lot in the fitness centre and swim also. My question is that is it possible to play tennis again after the injury in my knee, at least once each two weeks?
 
#3
The diagnosis says that the the cross-bond on the front part of the right knee is totally cut off. I Have worked hard to strengthen the muscles around the knee through intensive training in the fitness centre and also crawl swimming.
 
#5
Hi, I am 52 years old and I play tennis since I was 11 years old. For three years ago I had an injury in my knee where the cross-bond on the right knee is cut off. I still train a lot in the fitness centre and swim also. My question is that is it possible to play tennis again after the injury in my knee, at least once each two weeks?
What is the cross bond? How did you get this injury?
 
#7
Hi, I am 52 years old and I play tennis since I was 11 years old. For three years ago I had an injury in my knee where the cross-bond on the right knee is cut off. I still train a lot in the fitness centre and swim also. My question is that is it possible to play tennis again after the injury in my knee, at least once each two weeks?
What purpose does the cross-bond serve and how critical is that function to tennis?

Is it possible to injure it further [ie the injury then causes problems elsewhere due to compensation] and negatively impact your quality of life?

It sounds like it stabilizes the knee: if so, how well does your body respond when you have to decelerate and make a rapid change in direction? If even gentle movements hurt, your tennis would be limited to not going for those types of shots [sprinting for a ball is not nearly as stressful as stopping]. If you've strengthened the muscles around the knee to the point where they compensate for the injury, I'd say you can still play.

What does the MRI show? What does your doctor say?
 
#8
What purpose does the cross-bond serve and how critical is that function to tennis?

Is it possible to injure it further [ie the injury then causes problems elsewhere due to compensation] and negatively impact your quality of life?

It sounds like it stabilizes the knee: if so, how well does your body respond when you have to decelerate and make a rapid change in direction? If even gentle movements hurt, your tennis would be limited to not going for those types of shots [sprinting for a ball is not nearly as stressful as stopping]. If you've strengthened the muscles around the knee to the point where they compensate for the injury, I'd say you can still play.

What does the MRI show? What does your doctor say?
Thank you for your meaning concerning the injury in my knee. The MRI shows that the cross-bond on the front of the right knee is cut off. I agree with you that I have strengthened the muscles around the knee to the point where they compensate for the injury and I think that I can still play
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
#9
Thank you for your meaning concerning the injury in my knee. The MRI shows that the cross-bond on the front of the right knee is cut off. I agree with you that I have strengthened the muscles around the knee to the point where they compensate for the injury and I think that I can still play
You are using a term that is apparently unfamiliar to most of us. I know about the ACL, MCL, LCL, meniscus, and the patellar tendon, but have never heard of the cross-bond.
 
#10
You are using a term that is apparently unfamiliar to most of us. I know about the ACL, MCL, LCL, meniscus, and the patellar tendon, but have never heard of the cross-bond.
Thank you for your comment. The medical term for the cross-bond on the front of the knee is (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) which is in my case is with a total rupture
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
#11
Thank you for your comment. The medical term for the cross-bond on the front of the knee is (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) which is in my case is with a total rupture
Okay, now we are getting somewhere. I tore my Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and had it replaced. I now play two to three times a week, although I don't know that I could have for at least half a year after surgery, more likely a year. And when I do play, I wear a knee brace, more out of paranoia than actual need.

I have also played people who completely tore their ACL and didn't have it replaced, they just keep it wrapped tight or use very heavy duty braces. I can't imagine doing that, when I tore my ACL my knee felt like it could have bent backwards just walking.
 
#12
Okay, now we are getting somewhere. I tore my Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and had it replaced. I now play two to three times a week, although I don't know that I could have for at least half a year after surgery, more likely a year. And when I do play, I wear a knee brace, more out of paranoia than actual need.

I have also played people who completely tore their ACL and didn't have it replaced, they just keep it wrapped tight or use very heavy duty braces. I can't imagine doing that, when I tore my ACL my knee felt like it could have bent backwards just walking.
Thank you mmk for your useful comment, it helps a lot
 
#13
Thank you for your comment. The medical term for the cross-bond on the front of the knee is (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) which is in my case is with a total rupture
This is same injury that betthany mettak Sands had. she completely severed ACL, cross bond ligament. she had surgery and rehab for 6 month and playing better than ever in WTA tour.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
#14
This is same injury that betthany mettak Sands had. she completely severed ACL, cross bond ligament. she had surgery and rehab for 6 month and playing better than ever in WTA tour.
No, she had a dislocated kneecap and ruptured patellar tendon, and she was off the tour for over a year.
 
#15
No, she had a dislocated kneecap and ruptured patellar tendon, and she was off the tour for over a year.
Agreee but I was told she also had completely severed ACL too on top of all that. and she came back in 6 month and now is expected to win majors again.
 
#16
^^ NYT & ESPN make no mention of BMS sustaining a concurrent ACL rupture with her ruptured patellar tendon injury last year. Her return was splitting the difference in terms of time of 6 months/1 year. She was out at Wimbledon 2017 and returned 8 months later at Miami in March 2018. All can be googled.

OP, if you do a search you'll find many a thread of getting back to tennis with an ACL injury whether or not you get the surgery to repair it. It is possible to play with a 100% ruptured ACL, it really depends on how stable the knee feels with movement. Everyone will be different.

Good luck.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
#19
Thank you for your comment. The medical term for the cross-bond on the front of the knee is (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) which is in my case is with a total rupture
Okay, now we are getting somewhere. I tore my Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and had it replaced. I now play two to three times a week, although I don't know that I could have for at least half a year after surgery, more likely a year. And when I do play, I wear a knee brace, more out of paranoia than actual need.

I have also played people who completely tore their ACL and didn't have it replaced, they just keep it wrapped tight or use very heavy duty braces. I can't imagine doing that, when I tore my ACL my knee felt like it could have bent backwards just walking.
ditto, i got my acl replaced via allograph... almost 25y ago... complete tear,.. overshot a 60ft gap in the snowboard park.
after surgery, rehab, and alot of leg strength work... still going strong.
i was out for a year...
after rehab, i built up to where i was squatting 405 (at the time could do 315 for sets of 10+)
OP, which ever way to go... you must build up your leg strength so you can stay in an athletic (partial squat) stance for longer...
how did you tear it in the first place?
 
#20
ditto, i got my acl replaced via allograph... almost 25y ago... complete tear,.. overshot a 60ft gap in the snowboard park.
after surgery, rehab, and alot of leg strength work... still going strong.
i was out for a year...
after rehab, i built up to where i was squatting 405 (at the time could do 315 for sets of 10+)
OP, which ever way to go... you must build up your leg strength so you can stay in an athletic (partial squat) stance for longer...
how did you tear it in the first place?
A wrong move, while I was smashing the tennis ball, thank you for your comment and the information
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
#21
A wrong move, while I was smashing the tennis ball, thank you for your comment and the information
yeah, leg strength, and endurance... will help you properly make that move,... which i'm guessing was a lob that was slightly on your bh side (but not quite a bh oh)... so you twisted to get into position, instead of properly getting your feet under you and oriented the right way...
 
#22
yeah, leg strength, and endurance... will help you properly make that move,... which i'm guessing was a lob that was slightly on your bh side (but not quite a bh oh)... so you twisted to get into position, instead of properly getting your feet under you and oriented the right way...
Yes that is true, I twisted to get into position. Thank you for the advice.
 
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