And so it ends

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Bail! Geeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrroooooooooonnnnnnnnnnnniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmmmmmmmmmmooooooooooooooooooooooooo!
 

Wes

Professional
I remember in a post on these boards a while back, someone had a Babolat machine where the motor died, and found out that the manufacturer used an automobile windshield wiper motor, replaced his with that and worked fine, so motor should be no issue. I don't remember what make or model wiper motor used, but picture was shown and looked just like original.
Here's that thread (and your post).
Apparently, you even printed out the thread & put it along with your machine's manual etc.

 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Well, of the 3 listed failures, none of them turned out to be catastrophic. I'm going to ride the Mighty Steed for as long as his hooves will pound out a good weave. When he falls for good, I'm going to lug him to the balcony upstairs and drop him to the patio below. In the path of this fall I will place a drop weight stringer just to see if truly "nothing" can hurt one. I am seriously thinking of buying a Stringway for this final test. We'll see just how resilient a machine it is when 200 pounds of French technology meets it at the speed of gravity -- 32 feet per second per second for all you physicists out there......

Gee, I may even make a video of the "experiment". Anyone know a good director? ;)
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Don't go Stringway. I'd opt for the MiStringer or Pro Stringer instead, .........for the ultimate in nothing.
Sorry, nothing can sway me from this. I have heard AD NAUSEUM about what a Superman of a machine this is. So, we're going to find out. I'll unbox it, assemble it, and drop the Mighty Sensor on its ass.

I bet it ain't so automatic then.....
 

brownbearfalling

Hall of Fame
I’m glad to read the positive turn of events on this thread. Rabbit I wish for many more years of service in your mighty sensor. At some point I hope that you’ll have the longest running sensor in existence. It might happen with all the knowledge on this forum.

When I read your first post, my first reaction was to part out the machine. I’m sure plenty of people are in need of parts. Are the clamp bases compatible with Star 5? At the very least the clamps are worth something.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
If you are curious, let's say we push the Sensor out the window 12' above ground. It would take 0.866 seconds for it to crash into the ground and it would be traveling at 27.7 ft/sec. At this height, terminal velocity would be just before it hits the ground. Say Rabbit rents a plane an drops the Sensor out of it at 20,000 feet. Somewhere between 35 and 38 seconds, the Sensor will smash into the ground at the speed of sound. To exceed the speed of sound requires that the object receives an injection of velocity or have a V0 greater than the speed of sound.

@brownbearfalling - Shades of Dr. Frankenstein!
 

jim e

Legend
Sorry, nothing can sway me from this. I have heard AD NAUSEUM about what a Superman of a machine this is. So, we're going to find out. I'll unbox it, assemble it, and drop the Mighty Sensor on its ass.

I bet it ain't so automatic then.....
I have to give this a double like!
@Rabbit deserves the post of the month award. Can someone second this?
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I’m glad to read the positive turn of events on this thread. Rabbit I wish for many more years of service in your mighty sensor. At some point I hope that you’ll have the longest running sensor in existence.
Thanks, thanks a bunch, and let's hope so!

It might happen with all the knowledge on this forum.
One of my best friends here is an engineer from The Ohio State University. He guaranteed me yesterday over beers that we can keep it running for as long as I care to string. :)

When I read your first post, my first reaction was to part out the machine. I’m sure plenty of people are in need of parts. Are the clamp bases compatible with Star 5? At the very least the clamps are worth something.
The clamp bases on the Sensor are not compatible with the Star 5. The Sensor has push down/gravity release bases like the "new" ones on the Tourna 700. I am very fond of them as well. I had to buy a new clamp base as one of mine went out. When I purchased, I went ahead and bought two just to be safe.
 

tim-ay

Hall of Fame
One of my best friends here is an engineer from The Ohio State University. He guaranteed me yesterday over beers that we can keep it running for as long as I care to string. :)
Unless you have an ON SEMI power driver for one of the motor controllers….. with their 72 week freaking lead times right now! Haha. but he is right, unless a key controller IC goes EOL.
 

AceyMan

Semi-Pro
I am going to purchase a UPS for it. That should help condition the power.
While not a bad idea, be mindful that most affordable UPS units produce a chunky, squared off (think Tetris) looking AC current. These are typically hard on the downstream electronics resulting in reduced lifespan on the gear you're "protecting."

I'd say you'd be best off spending your dollars on a commercial grade surge arrestor, or as mentioned above, a dedicated fused line.

If you do stick with the UPS idea, look for 'true sine wave power' or equivalent words in the specifications. I just did a quick websearch and found a Tripp-lite model with this feature for under $300, so prices have come down since I last bought a UPS (=> nice side effect of tech progress, I suppose).

HTH,

/Acey
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
That environment is still around. COBOL added extensions to access and update all the latest-greatest database types. It allows you to obtain records and lock them so that no one can modify them while you are reading the info. It keeps track of updates to info so that changes are updated in the order they were made. Pending changes to data are kept separate from resident data. If enforced, the code is self documenting. You can have record layout libraries and standardized canned code that can be copied or called. Ever try to find a bug in C/C++ or script language? Especially if it is not documented?
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
But I bet those developers are in high demand given many state & local governments still use systems that run that software…
My point was COBOL (COmmon Business Oriented Language) was never intended for scientific applications, it was intended for database applications. Quite the contrary, Fortran (FORmula TRANslator) was intended for scientific applications and never intended for database type work. It struck me as if they were using a hammer to screw in a screw and vice versa.

To your point, experienced COBOL programmers are very much in demand. Most businesses have way too much money, time & effort invested in COBOL to simply come along and rewrite it. I have 40+ years in COBOL.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
That environment is still around. COBOL added extensions to access and update all the latest-greatest database types. It allows you to obtain records and lock them so that no one can modify them while you are reading the info. It keeps track of updates to info so that changes are updated in the order they were made. Pending changes to data are kept separate from resident data. If enforced, the code is self documenting. You can have record layout libraries and standardized canned code that can be copied or called. Ever try to find a bug in C/C++ or script language? Especially if it is not documented?
Amen. I have transitioned in my new life from z/OS to the iSeries. The i comes standard with DB2. The other guys on our team are mostly RPG converts. Even RPG pales in comparison to the ease with which COBOL handles database applications. I am by no means an SQL guru being an old VSAM guy, but it is really sweet. I would add that compared to z/OS and even z/VSE, the i can be a bit flaky at times. The report of COBOL's demise are exaggerated. :) If anything the shortfall in COBOL expertise is the failure of the education system which quit teaching COBOL as it was "antiquated". The real death of COBOL is from the rise in PC's. Why should/would a college maintain an expensive mainframe to teach COBOL when it can teach such vibrant languages as PL/1, Pascal, and dBase? ;)

One cool thing that I have had the opportunity to learn and use is Python. That language is fantastic for doing conversions and text manipulation. We had a guy who was a Perl expert. He wrote a really nice set of scripts that converted SAS to COBOL. I was and still am in awe of that little bit of coding.
 

Wes

Professional
Amen. I have transitioned in my new life from z/OS to the iSeries. The i comes standard with DB2. The other guys on our team are mostly RPG converts. Even RPG pales in comparison to the ease with which COBOL handles database applications. I am by no means an SQL guru being an old VSAM guy, but it is really sweet. I would add that compared to z/OS and even z/VSE, the i can be a bit flaky at times. The report of COBOL's demise are exaggerated. :) If anything the shortfall in COBOL expertise is the failure of the education system which quit teaching COBOL as it was "antiquated". The real death of COBOL is from the rise in PC's. Why should/would a college maintain an expensive mainframe to teach COBOL when it can teach such vibrant languages as PL/1, Pascal, and dBase? ;)

One cool thing that I have had the opportunity to learn and use is Python. That language is fantastic for doing conversions and text manipulation. We had a guy who was a Perl expert. He wrote a really nice set of scripts that converted SAS to COBOL. I was and still am in awe of that little bit of coding.

@Rabbit,
How long were you working at Playtech?

I think I'm the guy with the glasses.
 

McLovin

Legend
Amen. I have transitioned in my new life from z/OS to the iSeries. The i comes standard with DB2. The other guys on our team are mostly RPG converts. Even RPG pales in comparison to the ease with which COBOL handles database applications. I am by no means an SQL guru being an old VSAM guy, but it is really sweet. I would add that compared to z/OS and even z/VSE, the i can be a bit flaky at times. The report of COBOL's demise are exaggerated. :) If anything the shortfall in COBOL expertise is the failure of the education system which quit teaching COBOL as it was "antiquated". The real death of COBOL is from the rise in PC's. Why should/would a college maintain an expensive mainframe to teach COBOL when it can teach such vibrant languages as PL/1, Pascal, and dBase? ;)

One cool thing that I have had the opportunity to learn and use is Python. That language is fantastic for doing conversions and text manipulation. We had a guy who was a Perl expert. He wrote a really nice set of scripts that converted SAS to COBOL. I was and still am in awe of that little bit of coding.
All of this talk reminds me of the old Unix Fortune program that, among other things, had the 'Lesser Known Programming Languages' (See #8):


The Lesser-Known Programming Languages
#1: RENE
Named after the famous French philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes, RENE is a language used for artificial intelligence. The language is being developed at the Chicago Center of Machine Politics and Programming under a grant from the Jane Byrne Victory Fund. A spokesman described the language as "Just as great as dis [sic] city of ours."

The center is very pleased with progress to date. They say they have almost succeeded in getting a VAX to think. However, sources inside the organization say that each time the machine fails to think it ceases to exist.

#2: VALGOL
From its modest beginnings in Southern California's San Fernando Valley, VALGOL is enjoying a dramatic surge of popularity across the industry.

Here is a sample program:

LIKE, Y*KNOW(I MEAN)START
IF PIZZA == LIKE(BITCHEN) && GUY == LIKE(TUBULAR) &&
VALLEY_GIRL = LIKE(GRODY**MAX(FERSURE)**2) THEN {
FOR I = LIKE(1) TO OH*MAYBE(100)
DO*WAH - (DITTY**2)
BARF(I)=TOTALLY GROSS(OUT)
SURE
}
LIKE BAG THIS PROGRAM
REALLY
LIKE TOTALLY(Y*KNOW)
IM*SURE
GOTO THE MALL

When the user makes a syntax error, the interpreter displays the message:

GAG ME WITH A SPOON!!

#3: LAIDBACK
This language was developed at the Marin County Center for T'ai Chi, Mellowness and Computer Programming (now defunct), as an alternative to the more intense atmosphere in nearby Silicon Valley.

The center was ideal for programmers who liked to soak in hot tubs while they worked. Unfortunately few programmers could survive there because the center outlawed Pizza and Coca-Cola in favor of Tofu and Perrier.

Many mourn the demise of LAIDBACK because of its reputation as a gentle and non-threatening language since all error messages are in lower case. For example, LAIDBACK responded to syntax errors with the message:

i hate to bother you, but i just can't relate to that. can
you find the time to try it again?

#4: SIMPLE
SIMPLE is an acronym for Sheer Idiot's Monopurpose Programming Language Environment. This language, developed at the Hanover College for Technological Misfits, was designed to make it impossible to write code with errors in it. The statements are, therefore, confined to BEGIN, END and STOP. No matter how you arrange the statements, you can't make a syntax error. Programs written in SIMPLE do nothing useful. Thus they achieve the results of programs written in other languages without the tedious, frustrating process of testing and debugging.

#5: LITHP
This otherwise unremarkable language is distinguished by the absence of an "S" in its character set; users must substitute "TH". LITHP is said to be useful in protheththing lithtth.

#6: SLOBOL
SLOBOL is best known for the speed, or lack of it, of its compiler. Although many compilers allow you to take a coffee break while they compile, SLOBOL compilers allow you to travel to Bolivia to pick the coffee. Forty-three programmers are known to have died of boredom sitting at their terminals while waiting for a SLOBOL program to compile. Weary SLOBOL programmers often turn to a related (but infinitely faster) language, COCAINE.

#7: SARTRE
Named after the late existential philosopher, SARTRE is an extremely unstructured language. Statements in SARTRE have no purpose; they just are. Thus SARTRE programs are left to define their own functions. SARTRE programmers tend to be boring and depressed, and are no fun at parties.

#8: C-
This language was named for the grade received by its creator when he submitted it as a class project in a graduate programming class. C- is best described as a "low-level" programming language. In fact, the language generally requires more C- statements than machine-code statements to execute a given task. In this respect, it is very similar to COBOL.

#9: FIFTH
FIFTH is a precision mathematical language in which the data types refer to quantity. The data types range from CC, OUNCE, SHOT, and JIGGER to FIFTH (hence the name of the language), LITER, MAGNUM and BLOTTO. Commands refer to ingredients such as CHABLIS, CHARDONNAY, CABERNET, GIN, VERMOUTH, VODKA, SCOTCH, and WHATEVERSAROUND.

The many versions of the FIFTH language reflect the sophistication and financial status of its users. Commands in the ELITE dialect include VSOP and LAFITE, while commands in the GUTTER dialect include HOOTCH and RIPPLE. The latter is a favorite of frustrated FORTH programmers who end up using this language.
 
The one on Sartre was funny as it reminded me of a paper I wrote in HS. The teacher gave us an assignment to write a research paper (11th grade). I felt that if we were going to have to do research to do a paper, she was going to have to do research to grade mine. My paper was titled: Comparing and Contrasting the Existential Views of JP Sartre and Martin Heidegger. She wasn't amused.
 
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