Andy Gerst PodCast - Everything about Tennis

Jalee

Rookie
Anyone curious what fan favorite former playtester Andy Gerst has been up to you need to check out his awesome Podcast discussing any and all things tennis. I highly recommend it and would love to start conversations with anyone already listening. The strategies/tips discussed have been invaluable to me (USTA 4.0) and easily translates to players of all levels. (It is also on soundcloud and probably others for those who don't use apple)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/5-simple-singles-tips-that-can-help-you-win-more-matches/id1437911517?i=1000422518569&mt=2
 

NuBas

Legend
Thanks. I’m still new to Podcast so just use what my phone has. Have you listened to many?
No. I only listened to this particular podcast because of your thread. I use avenues like YouTube more for different things but I guess its worth to keep an eye on this podcast for updates.
 

Jalee

Rookie
No. I only listened to this particular podcast because of your thread. I use avenues like YouTube more for different things but I guess its worth to keep an eye on this podcast for updates.
I watch a lot of youtube also but really liked the tips and content in this podcast. I'm always looking for ways to improve and very interested about the insight all these coaches and players have that I could apply to my game. I'm still a few behind but I have really enjoyed them and they go by really quickly, easy listening.

What did you think of the one you did listen to?
 

NuBas

Legend
I watch a lot of youtube also but really liked the tips and content in this podcast. I'm always looking for ways to improve and very interested about the insight all these coaches and players have that I could apply to my game. I'm still a few behind but I have really enjoyed them and they go by really quickly, easy listening.

What did you think of the one you did listen to?
I listened to the 5 Tips and 7 Tips with Danielle Lao podcast and for me to really get anything out of these I'd have to learn something new and really mind blowing but the advice was just standard even when they said something interesting like having your weight on the forefoot for weight transfer, that's kinda common sense. I'm always on lookout for more insights and secrets when it comes to technique.

A lot of the advice given wasn't anything ground breaking, it was just repeated stuff I have heard before.
 

Jalee

Rookie
I have never had any formal training as my mom was a rec player and coached me and my brothers growing up. If the advice/tip is advanced or basic it is something I either need to hear as a reminder to make a priority or a new/different insight to try to add to may game. I'm only a USTA 4.0 on the cusp of 4.5 so I can use all the help I can get especially if I get bumped this year. I'm also an emotional player so the self management part was perfect for me to hear again and really take note of.
 
latest podcast is an interview with Allen Fox on "Dealing with Frustration, Choking, and Pressure on Court".
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
 

Jalee

Rookie
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
I suppose that could be part of it but the level of stress they are under for ranking points/money/brand is more than the rec player knows and you still see the pros getting angry breaking racquets and losing their cool...some more than others. I don’t think it is easy for everyone, it never has been for me, but I think that certain personalities are more equipped to handle their emotions. My brother can play better mad and if I get mad I play worse. Over time I have gotten better about controlling the negative emotions I can have on court but I’m still not a drone like a few guys I know. So in short I don’t agree with him because that isn’t how I operate but I can see how some people can flip a switch, my brother and dad are both that way.

I have found that if I choose to have a good attitude on the day of my matches and going on court I play better and have a better connection between my head and game. How do you deal with you emotions on court?
 
D

Deleted member 54265

Guest
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
Yes and no, I used to be a pro Volleyball player and can give some perspective from that point of view.

Volleyball is a team sport, but all players are individuals so some of the same psykology is vaild. On a team you find out that your teammates react very different on preassure, tight matches, fan crouds can be very verbal during matches unlike the tennis croud and so on. You will have players who is amazing in the warmups (and at training), spikes crazy balls bouncing up to the cealing, but once the match starts and they miss a few easy points or get blocked out they can completely fall apart - other players react with anger, and that can be both destructive or productive for the team - at the end of a close match, when a lot of players tighten up and starts to play more scecure, you will also have players who starts to shine and dont hold back under preassure, a tight game seems to bring out the best in these players (I used to be one of those players).

I am not sure this is something that can really be learned, I think sports like tennis brings out the character in a person. I believe that there is a lot you can do, but the best is to be who you really are and work with that.

In volleyball you can talk to your opponants, and it is really an art to try and get in your opponants head. Generally speaking (with exceptions) players play worse when mad, as they tend to tighten up and try go for more than they can handle. If your opponant is in a flow you want to get him out of this. Thee are many dirty trix I learned from volleyball, that one can use without the opponant even being aware of it - but that is another story :):).

I my present as a tennis player, I have a great coach who studied under Jim Loear, so I get his perspective too. He teach us the Bjorn Borg way of not giving anything away to the opponant. I am a little different and he is truly laughing at all my small trix at training (always done with a smile on my face and for fun, I simply cant help it, it is part of my personallity).

Sports psycology is complex, but I truly believe that it is very individual, and you have to play a game that fits your personallity.

I am rambeling, spelling control is off on my ipad so I hope I make sense

Cheers, Toby
 
Yes and no, I used to be a pro Volleyball player and can give some perspective from that point of view.

Volleyball is a team sport, but all players are individuals so some of the same psykology is vaild. On a team you find out that your teammates react very different on preassure, tight matches, fan crouds can be very verbal during matches unlike the tennis croud and so on. You will have players who is amazing in the warmups (and at training), spikes crazy balls bouncing up to the cealing, but once the match starts and they miss a few easy points or get blocked out they can completely fall apart - other players react with anger, and that can be both destructive or productive for the team - at the end of a close match, when a lot of players tighten up and starts to play more scecure, you will also have players who starts to shine and dont hold back under preassure, a tight game seems to bring out the best in these players (I used to be one of those players).

I am not sure this is something that can really be learned, I think sports like tennis brings out the character in a person. I believe that there is a lot you can do, but the best is to be who you really are and work with that.

In volleyball you can talk to your opponants, and it is really an art to try and get in your opponants head. Generally speaking (with exceptions) players play worse when mad, as they tend to tighten up and try go for more than they can handle. If your opponant is in a flow you want to get him out of this. Thee are many dirty trix I learned from volleyball, that one can use without the opponant even being aware of it - but that is another story :):).

I my present as a tennis player, I have a great coach who studied under Jim Loear, so I get his perspective too. He teach us the Bjorn Borg way of not giving anything away to the opponant. I am a little different and he is truly laughing at all my small trix at training (always done with a smile on my face and for fun, I simply cant help it, it is part of my personallity).

Sports psycology is complex, but I truly believe that it is very individual, and you have to play a game that fits your personallity.

I am rambeling, spelling control is off on my ipad so I hope I make sense

Cheers, Toby
I can somewhat relate as I used to play VB but nowhere near a pro level [although I was fortunate to play against some of the National B team here and there]. I too have seen the opponents that look great in hitting lines but if you can block them twice, they are done. They are dangerous when they get on a roll, though. Then they can be untouchable.

Maybe one reason I have an easier time with mental toughness in tennis is because of all of that VB I played with fans yelling, the other team trying to fake you out, balls constantly rolling over from other courts, whistles blowing, etc. Tennis is like a library by comparison.
 
I suppose that could be part of it but the level of stress they are under for ranking points/money/brand is more than the rec player knows and you still see the pros getting angry breaking racquets and losing their cool...some more than others. I don’t think it is easy for everyone, it never has been for me, but I think that certain personalities are more equipped to handle their emotions. My brother can play better mad and if I get mad I play worse. Over time I have gotten better about controlling the negative emotions I can have on court but I’m still not a drone like a few guys I know. So in short I don’t agree with him because that isn’t how I operate but I can see how some people can flip a switch, my brother and dad are both that way.

I have found that if I choose to have a good attitude on the day of my matches and going on court I play better and have a better connection between my head and game. How do you deal with you emotions on court?
I like what you wrote about having a good attitude going in: I try to be thankful I can play the game I love [although I still get pi$$ed at myself when I blow a floater putaway].

I try to stay point-focused [the only point that matters is the one you're playing/about to play] and process-focused, not results-oriented. It's hard when everything is scored but I try to form a psychic bubble where the slings and arrows of outrageous emotion can't get to me. I think I heard a podcast where Sharapova was described as doing this.
 
Surprised to learn from this podcast that Andy and Hannah are together now? And Hannah's going to law school?
Yep! And living in LA now. I ran into him last year after he and his pupil/client Danielle Lau got back from the US open. She had just lost in the 1st round after making it through qualifying.

I saw a familiar looking guy practicing his serve in the court next to me, and though,”is that...?” But shrugged it off until I heard his voice, and then I knew.

I introduced myself and thanked him for all he’d done for my tennis education, specifically, I said, “thanks for teaching me how to string a racquet last night!” Because, indeed, the night before, I had used his TW tennis stringing video to put my new (to me) Gamma X-2 to use, and was hitting with the very racquet I had strung up under his guidance. He said he had left TW the previous year, and was coaching Danielle and that he had a podcast. Ive been a deviate listener ever since.

I always seem to find important nuggets from each episode from’ “Done the middle solves the riddle.” In the doubles strategy episode, To “the list of foods you can’t eat should be a short one,” in the dietary episode to, “tennis is a game of disruption.” That’s the one that made me take a look at players like Kyrgios I’m a new light. The latest nugget is “85% of all injuries are from deceleration impact,” so now I’m going to try to focus more on my movement and hopefully keep my aging body intact for a longer and healthier tennis “career”. I don’t want to be the double knee replacement guy when I’m 80 if possible.

Anyway, thanks again to Andy for all he’s done for the game!!!!

Now who wants to chip in to buy him a new mic?

I’m told this one is a good choice;

(And yes, I found out this information specifically with Andy’s podcast in mind)


https://express.google.com/u/0/product/14897451379154089630_5861947917376811829_12145?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=tu_cu&utm_content=eid-lsjeuxoeqt,eid-fuowqbwzks,eid-mbhxklpyiq&gtim=CNqG19--xPSKzAEQg6ak5oD2kqfWARjAvZovIgNVU0QokOiK5QUw8V4&utm_campaign=12145&gclid=CjwKCAjwstfkBRBoEiwADTmnEKhGdXYlSJZiHi8NMmUoPVmwVbm2eVtG6qwDgohC8_UYbQYnVH0wThoC1X8QAvD_BwE






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

topspinlob

Rookie
Yep! And living in LA now. I ran into him last year after he and his pupil/client Danielle Lau got back from the US open. She had just lost in the 1st round after making it through qualifying.

I saw a familiar looking guy practicing his serve in the court next to me, and though,”is that...?” But shrugged it off until I heard his voice, and then I knew.

I introduced myself and thanked him for all he’d done for my tennis education, specifically, I said, “thanks for teaching me how to string a racquet last night!” Because, indeed, the night before, I had used his TW tennis stringing video to put my new (to me) Gamma X-2 to use, and was hitting with the very racquet I had strung up under his guidance. He said he had left TW the previous year, and was coaching Danielle and that he had a podcast. Ive been a deviate listener ever since.

I always seem to find important nuggets from each episode from’ “Done the middle solves the riddle.” In the doubles strategy episode, To “the list of foods you can’t eat should be a short one,” in the dietary episode to, “tennis is a game of disruption.” That’s the one that made me take a look at players like Kyrgios I’m a new light. The latest nugget is “85% of all injuries are from deceleration impact,” so now I’m going to try to focus more on my movement and hopefully keep my aging body intact for a longer and healthier tennis “career”. I don’t want to be the double knee replacement guy when I’m 80 if possible.

Anyway, thanks again to Andy for all he’s done for the game!!!!

Now who wants to chip in to buy him a new mic?

I’m told this one is a good choice;

(And yes, I found out this information specifically with Andy’s podcast in mind)


https://express.google.com/u/0/product/14897451379154089630_5861947917376811829_12145?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=tu_cu&utm_content=eid-lsjeuxoeqt,eid-fuowqbwzks,eid-mbhxklpyiq&gtim=CNqG19--xPSKzAEQg6ak5oD2kqfWARjAvZovIgNVU0QokOiK5QUw8V4&utm_campaign=12145&gclid=CjwKCAjwstfkBRBoEiwADTmnEKhGdXYlSJZiHi8NMmUoPVmwVbm2eVtG6qwDgohC8_UYbQYnVH0wThoC1X8QAvD_BwE






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Just started listening Andy's podcast religiously on the way to work! With all the recent rain in LA and not being able to play, his podcast has been helping me out on not going crazy and not being able to play.. I play at the Echo Park courts and the Griffith Park Riverside courts. I always hope I would run into him and Hannah so I can just say hi and be a "fan boy"...hahaha
 
Just started listening Andy's podcast religiously on the way to work! With all the recent rain in LA and not being able to play, his podcast has been helping me out on not going crazy and not being able to play.. I play at the Echo Park courts and the Griffith Park Riverside courts. I always hope I would run into him and Hannah so I can just say hi and be a "fan boy"...hahaha
Did you say LA? Are you sure you're not me? Echo Park is where I play too! I saw him up at the scenic Vt. Canyon courts in Griffith Park (love those courts!)

Maybe you can stalk them at one of their local eateries, based on the podcast from a couple weeks ago.

Also, we should meet up IRL. I get to play Echo several times a week in the mornings, since I'm freelance and my friends are " in between opportunities."
 

topspinlob

Rookie
Yes sir.. LA! i just DMed you... i have eaten at most of the local eateries they were talking about...hahaha i loved that podcast.. tennis players talking about food!
 
The latest episode with Curt Wheeler talking about doubles had a couple of points that I also came up with on my own:

- Play I formation but don't move laterally: plug the middle and make them try to pass you.

- Against a 2-back formation [I find it even works in 1u/1b], hit some volleys short: people who love to rip big TS from the BL do not like moving forward 8' and getting low. Their effectiveness almost always drops, making the next volley one to attack. It's also harder to lob from a low position so you can crowd the net more than you would otherwise.

Gerst and friends know their stuff!
 

tomato123

Semi-Pro
Just listened to the Allen Fox podcast on my commute and I can certainly identify myself as the "pessimist," type-A, results oriented, etc player and the mental struggle is real for me. Especially because that kind of mentality has usually been associated with good things that drives my professional success.

I'd probably be a horrible baseball player in that context because I'm not sure how I'd convince myself a .300 batting average is a great statistic. My coach is always encouraging me to keep going for my shots because on average, I'll make them more than miss them. Kind of hilarious that I decided to learn serve and volley for the past half year because from a "theoretical" and "stragetic" standpoint it made a lot of sense to me, but in real life match scenarios, it's been one of the most mentally challenging hurdles to push myself despite getting passed many times and God forbid, miss "easy" overheads or put away volleys. But I can certainly vouch for the mental exercises and mindfulness/meditation as a highly helpful tool... just let go and go for it! (hopefully, haha)
 

Jalee

Rookie
Just listened to the Allen Fox podcast on my commute and I can certainly identify myself as the "pessimist," type-A, results oriented, etc player and the mental struggle is real for me. Especially because that kind of mentality has usually been associated with good things that drives my professional success.

I'd probably be a horrible baseball player in that context because I'm not sure how I'd convince myself a .300 batting average is a great statistic. My coach is always encouraging me to keep going for my shots because on average, I'll make them more than miss them. Kind of hilarious that I decided to learn serve and volley for the past half year because from a "theoretical" and "stragetic" standpoint it made a lot of sense to me, but in real life match scenarios, it's been one of the most mentally challenging hurdles to push myself despite getting passed many times and God forbid, miss "easy" overheads or put away volleys. But I can certainly vouch for the mental exercises and mindfulness/meditation as a highly helpful tool... just let go and go for it! (hopefully, haha)
I am a couple episodes behind as I haven't been on the road as much recently but I was a baseball player and that stat wasn't as big a deal for me as strike outs. I hated striking out and getting out any other way was better. I went a couple years only striking out 3-5 times total. I have dabbled in serve and volley but I find that I'm much better coming in after a ground stroke if I come in at all. I'm a baseliner all the way. Do you have any personal tips that have helped you becoming a better serve and volley player???
 

tomato123

Semi-Pro
I am a couple episodes behind as I haven't been on the road as much recently but I was a baseball player and that stat wasn't as big a deal for me as strike outs. I hated striking out and getting out any other way was better. I went a couple years only striking out 3-5 times total. I have dabbled in serve and volley but I find that I'm much better coming in after a ground stroke if I come in at all. I'm a baseliner all the way. Do you have any personal tips that have helped you becoming a better serve and volley player???
Can't really comment too much about how to technically improve at the serve and volley because I still have a lot to learn myself, but a couple of the serve and volley threads were helpful to read as they also contained videos to help me visualize. I've been taking it one thing at a time from a technical standpoint, and ramping things up incrementally in match play (and training my mind away from being results oriented, which goes against what i'm used to), and I've been fortunate enough to work with a coach 1-2 times a week to practice with. I think "just doing it" is half the battle for me but I think I've gotten to the point where it's starting to feel more natural and more comfortable. Also had great help from @S&V-not_dead_yet on both the technical and mental aspects of the play style!
 

Jalee

Rookie
Can't really comment too much about how to technically improve at the serve and volley because I still have a lot to learn myself, but a couple of the serve and volley threads were helpful to read as they also contained videos to help me visualize. I've been taking it one thing at a time from a technical standpoint, and ramping things up incrementally in match play (and training my mind away from being results oriented, which goes against what i'm used to), and I've been fortunate enough to work with a coach 1-2 times a week to practice with. I think "just doing it" is half the battle for me but I think I've gotten to the point where it's starting to feel more natural and more comfortable. Also had great help from @S&V-not_dead_yet on both the technical and mental aspects of the play style!
I will check out the threads and videos. I don't try it often as I feel like fish out of water when I do but I know it is a great thing to be able to do when playing certain opponents to keep them on their heels or guessing. I have never felt comfortable at the net but transitioning there is getting easier as I have made it a point to work on following my shots....then I get there and it's a crap shot as to how the rest of the point will play out.
 
I have dabbled in serve and volley but I find that I'm much better coming in after a ground stroke if I come in at all. I'm a baseliner all the way. Do you have any personal tips that have helped you becoming a better serve and volley player???
The immersion technique is simply to commit to S&V every time, 1st and 2nd serves. You'll get passed. A lot. After a while, you'll discover that the world is not ending, the sky is not falling, and it was just a point. You'll also discover that you'll win a certain # of those points because your opponent will miss due to the increased pressure of you coming to the net.

The advantage, just like learning a language immersively, is that you rapidly will build up a large "vocabulary" of S&V situations: what serves tend to work better against certain opponents, whether to volley into the open court or to hit behind them, when to attack and when to just try and hit it deep, various "tells" the opponent will show which tell you what shot he's going to hit, etc. Within a few short weeks, situations that used to bedevil you will seem commonplace...because they are.
 
I will check out the threads and videos. I don't try it often as I feel like fish out of water when I do but I know it is a great thing to be able to do when playing certain opponents to keep them on their heels or guessing. I have never felt comfortable at the net but transitioning there is getting easier as I have made it a point to work on following my shots....then I get there and it's a crap shot as to how the rest of the point will play out.
The reason you feel like a fish out of water is because you don't S&V much; it's a self-reinforcing cycle. The only way to break it is to "Just Do It" as the slogan goes.
 
The reason you feel like a fish out of water is because you don't S&V much; it's a self-reinforcing cycle. The only way to break it is to "Just Do It" as the slogan goes.
Hoping to re-learn the S&V. I’ve always been comfortable at net, and was a serve & volley guy in my youth, but later on I had to stop myself (for some reason???) I have been catching myself stopping hard after naturally coming in a couple steps off a hard first serve. My body wants to come to net, but my kind convinced me it’s not how it’s supposed to be anymore. So now I have to start forcing myself. Luckily the team I’ve been practicing with emphasized S&V as their primary weapon in doubles, so I will have incentive and external motivation.


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Hoping to re-learn the S&V. I’ve always been comfortable at net, and was a serve & volley guy in my youth, but later on I had to stop myself (for some reason???) I have been catching myself stopping hard after naturally coming in a couple steps off a hard first serve. My body wants to come to net, but my kind convinced me it’s not how it’s supposed to be anymore. So now I have to start forcing myself. Luckily the team I’ve been practicing with emphasized S&V as their primary weapon in doubles, so I will have incentive and external motivation.
It's even easier to change one's mindset in doubles because you rarely get passed due to having a partner. That doesn't mean you won't miss volleys but it does take away most people's biggest fear of getting passed.

In fact, doubles is a fantastic way to [re]learn S&V because you can hit a conservative, spin serve and still stand a decent chance of getting through NML with the first volley. I'd say people don't start shoving that serve back down my throat until upper 4.5 and definitely 5.0.
 
Latest episode: interviewee mentions something I've often thought: it's not beneficial to ONLY play up because there's no pressure. When you face someone below you whom you're *supposed* to beat and you have no experience dealing with a pusher or someone with less pretty strokes, there is the danger of falling apart.

"I'm way better than X! He doesn't even belong on the same court as me!" We all know how *that* turns out.
 

Jalee

Rookie
Latest episode: interviewee mentions something I've often thought: it's not beneficial to ONLY play up because there's no pressure. When you face someone below you whom you're *supposed* to beat and you have no experience dealing with a pusher or someone with less pretty strokes, there is the danger of falling apart.

"I'm way better than X! He doesn't even belong on the same court as me!" We all know how *that* turns out.
I know exactly how that turns out! I play with more calm and focus against better players and when I play one I should beat on paper my stress level goes up. I'm almost always fighting mentally whenever I am on court. I have been trying to read more and get into patterns before and during matches to help with that side of my game. A mental coach could be something I look into in the future just to see if I can rewire myself a little.
 
I know exactly how that turns out! I play with more calm and focus against better players and when I play one I should beat on paper my stress level goes up. I'm almost always fighting mentally whenever I am on court. I have been trying to read more and get into patterns before and during matches to help with that side of my game. A mental coach could be something I look into in the future just to see if I can rewire myself a little.
What I've gotten better at in the last year or so is recognizing when I'm tightening up against a lower player and how many times he can't hurt me nearly as much as I can hurt myself. That allows me to relax and to be able to go for my shots more freely.
 

hurworld

Hall of Fame
And also congrats to Andy being offered the job of a USTA Women's coach. Even though that means less podcast content from him in the near future until he settles in the job.
 

TW Staff

Administrator
An update from Andy and what the status of his podcast is!


ITUNES: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talk-tennis/id1475845728?l
SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/7aCFGNA2VnSOJus9qM2jrx
STITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=453304&refid=stpr
Tennis Warehouse: https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/podcast/

Enjoy,

Michelle, TW
 

Jalee

Rookie
An update from Andy and what the status of his podcast is!


ITUNES: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talk-tennis/id1475845728?l
SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/7aCFGNA2VnSOJus9qM2jrx
STITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=453304&refid=stpr
Tennis Warehouse: https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/podcast/

Enjoy,

Michelle, TW
Thank you for the heads up!
 
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