Andy Gerst PodCast - Everything about Tennis

#1
Anyone curious what fan favorite former playtester Andy Gerst has been up to you need to check out his awesome Podcast discussing any and all things tennis. I highly recommend it and would love to start conversations with anyone already listening. The strategies/tips discussed have been invaluable to me (USTA 4.0) and easily translates to players of all levels. (It is also on soundcloud and probably others for those who don't use apple)

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast...ore-matches/id1437911517?i=1000422518569&mt=2
 
#4
Thanks. I’m still new to Podcast so just use what my phone has. Have you listened to many?
No. I only listened to this particular podcast because of your thread. I use avenues like YouTube more for different things but I guess its worth to keep an eye on this podcast for updates.
 
#5
No. I only listened to this particular podcast because of your thread. I use avenues like YouTube more for different things but I guess its worth to keep an eye on this podcast for updates.
I watch a lot of youtube also but really liked the tips and content in this podcast. I'm always looking for ways to improve and very interested about the insight all these coaches and players have that I could apply to my game. I'm still a few behind but I have really enjoyed them and they go by really quickly, easy listening.

What did you think of the one you did listen to?
 
#6
I watch a lot of youtube also but really liked the tips and content in this podcast. I'm always looking for ways to improve and very interested about the insight all these coaches and players have that I could apply to my game. I'm still a few behind but I have really enjoyed them and they go by really quickly, easy listening.

What did you think of the one you did listen to?
I listened to the 5 Tips and 7 Tips with Danielle Lao podcast and for me to really get anything out of these I'd have to learn something new and really mind blowing but the advice was just standard even when they said something interesting like having your weight on the forefoot for weight transfer, that's kinda common sense. I'm always on lookout for more insights and secrets when it comes to technique.

A lot of the advice given wasn't anything ground breaking, it was just repeated stuff I have heard before.
 
#7
I have never had any formal training as my mom was a rec player and coached me and my brothers growing up. If the advice/tip is advanced or basic it is something I either need to hear as a reminder to make a priority or a new/different insight to try to add to may game. I'm only a USTA 4.0 on the cusp of 4.5 so I can use all the help I can get especially if I get bumped this year. I'm also an emotional player so the self management part was perfect for me to hear again and really take note of.
 
#18
latest podcast is an interview with Allen Fox on "Dealing with Frustration, Choking, and Pressure on Court".
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
 
#19
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
I suppose that could be part of it but the level of stress they are under for ranking points/money/brand is more than the rec player knows and you still see the pros getting angry breaking racquets and losing their cool...some more than others. I don’t think it is easy for everyone, it never has been for me, but I think that certain personalities are more equipped to handle their emotions. My brother can play better mad and if I get mad I play worse. Over time I have gotten better about controlling the negative emotions I can have on court but I’m still not a drone like a few guys I know. So in short I don’t agree with him because that isn’t how I operate but I can see how some people can flip a switch, my brother and dad are both that way.

I have found that if I choose to have a good attitude on the day of my matches and going on court I play better and have a better connection between my head and game. How do you deal with you emotions on court?
 
#20
@Toby14

I believe you've posted in the past about having some fairly high-level experience: what's your take on Fox's explanations?

For example, I disagree with him on the Anger section: he makes it seem like it's as simple and trivial as flipping a switch but I watch adult rec tennis [including my own reactions] and I see a lot of people who apparently find it more difficult to control. Would you say it's less prevalent at higher levels, simply because natural selection has weeded out the mentally weaker ones?
Yes and no, I used to be a pro Volleyball player and can give some perspective from that point of view.

Volleyball is a team sport, but all players are individuals so some of the same psykology is vaild. On a team you find out that your teammates react very different on preassure, tight matches, fan crouds can be very verbal during matches unlike the tennis croud and so on. You will have players who is amazing in the warmups (and at training), spikes crazy balls bouncing up to the cealing, but once the match starts and they miss a few easy points or get blocked out they can completely fall apart - other players react with anger, and that can be both destructive or productive for the team - at the end of a close match, when a lot of players tighten up and starts to play more scecure, you will also have players who starts to shine and dont hold back under preassure, a tight game seems to bring out the best in these players (I used to be one of those players).

I am not sure this is something that can really be learned, I think sports like tennis brings out the character in a person. I believe that there is a lot you can do, but the best is to be who you really are and work with that.

In volleyball you can talk to your opponants, and it is really an art to try and get in your opponants head. Generally speaking (with exceptions) players play worse when mad, as they tend to tighten up and try go for more than they can handle. If your opponant is in a flow you want to get him out of this. Thee are many dirty trix I learned from volleyball, that one can use without the opponant even being aware of it - but that is another story :):).

I my present as a tennis player, I have a great coach who studied under Jim Loear, so I get his perspective too. He teach us the Bjorn Borg way of not giving anything away to the opponant. I am a little different and he is truly laughing at all my small trix at training (always done with a smile on my face and for fun, I simply cant help it, it is part of my personallity).

Sports psycology is complex, but I truly believe that it is very individual, and you have to play a game that fits your personallity.

I am rambeling, spelling control is off on my ipad so I hope I make sense

Cheers, Toby
 
#21
Yes and no, I used to be a pro Volleyball player and can give some perspective from that point of view.

Volleyball is a team sport, but all players are individuals so some of the same psykology is vaild. On a team you find out that your teammates react very different on preassure, tight matches, fan crouds can be very verbal during matches unlike the tennis croud and so on. You will have players who is amazing in the warmups (and at training), spikes crazy balls bouncing up to the cealing, but once the match starts and they miss a few easy points or get blocked out they can completely fall apart - other players react with anger, and that can be both destructive or productive for the team - at the end of a close match, when a lot of players tighten up and starts to play more scecure, you will also have players who starts to shine and dont hold back under preassure, a tight game seems to bring out the best in these players (I used to be one of those players).

I am not sure this is something that can really be learned, I think sports like tennis brings out the character in a person. I believe that there is a lot you can do, but the best is to be who you really are and work with that.

In volleyball you can talk to your opponants, and it is really an art to try and get in your opponants head. Generally speaking (with exceptions) players play worse when mad, as they tend to tighten up and try go for more than they can handle. If your opponant is in a flow you want to get him out of this. Thee are many dirty trix I learned from volleyball, that one can use without the opponant even being aware of it - but that is another story :):).

I my present as a tennis player, I have a great coach who studied under Jim Loear, so I get his perspective too. He teach us the Bjorn Borg way of not giving anything away to the opponant. I am a little different and he is truly laughing at all my small trix at training (always done with a smile on my face and for fun, I simply cant help it, it is part of my personallity).

Sports psycology is complex, but I truly believe that it is very individual, and you have to play a game that fits your personallity.

I am rambeling, spelling control is off on my ipad so I hope I make sense

Cheers, Toby
I can somewhat relate as I used to play VB but nowhere near a pro level [although I was fortunate to play against some of the National B team here and there]. I too have seen the opponents that look great in hitting lines but if you can block them twice, they are done. They are dangerous when they get on a roll, though. Then they can be untouchable.

Maybe one reason I have an easier time with mental toughness in tennis is because of all of that VB I played with fans yelling, the other team trying to fake you out, balls constantly rolling over from other courts, whistles blowing, etc. Tennis is like a library by comparison.
 
#22
I suppose that could be part of it but the level of stress they are under for ranking points/money/brand is more than the rec player knows and you still see the pros getting angry breaking racquets and losing their cool...some more than others. I don’t think it is easy for everyone, it never has been for me, but I think that certain personalities are more equipped to handle their emotions. My brother can play better mad and if I get mad I play worse. Over time I have gotten better about controlling the negative emotions I can have on court but I’m still not a drone like a few guys I know. So in short I don’t agree with him because that isn’t how I operate but I can see how some people can flip a switch, my brother and dad are both that way.

I have found that if I choose to have a good attitude on the day of my matches and going on court I play better and have a better connection between my head and game. How do you deal with you emotions on court?
I like what you wrote about having a good attitude going in: I try to be thankful I can play the game I love [although I still get pi$$ed at myself when I blow a floater putaway].

I try to stay point-focused [the only point that matters is the one you're playing/about to play] and process-focused, not results-oriented. It's hard when everything is scored but I try to form a psychic bubble where the slings and arrows of outrageous emotion can't get to me. I think I heard a podcast where Sharapova was described as doing this.
 
#25
Surprised to learn from this podcast that Andy and Hannah are together now? And Hannah's going to law school?
Yep! And living in LA now. I ran into him last year after he and his pupil/client Danielle Lau got back from the US open. She had just lost in the 1st round after making it through qualifying.

I saw a familiar looking guy practicing his serve in the court next to me, and though,”is that...?” But shrugged it off until I heard his voice, and then I knew.

I introduced myself and thanked him for all he’d done for my tennis education, specifically, I said, “thanks for teaching me how to string a racquet last night!” Because, indeed, the night before, I had used his TW tennis stringing video to put my new (to me) Gamma X-2 to use, and was hitting with the very racquet I had strung up under his guidance. He said he had left TW the previous year, and was coaching Danielle and that he had a podcast. Ive been a deviate listener ever since.

I always seem to find important nuggets from each episode from’ “Done the middle solves the riddle.” In the doubles strategy episode, To “the list of foods you can’t eat should be a short one,” in the dietary episode to, “tennis is a game of disruption.” That’s the one that made me take a look at players like Kyrgios I’m a new light. The latest nugget is “85% of all injuries are from deceleration impact,” so now I’m going to try to focus more on my movement and hopefully keep my aging body intact for a longer and healthier tennis “career”. I don’t want to be the double knee replacement guy when I’m 80 if possible.

Anyway, thanks again to Andy for all he’s done for the game!!!!

Now who wants to chip in to buy him a new mic?

I’m told this one is a good choice;

(And yes, I found out this information specifically with Andy’s podcast in mind)


https://express.google.com/u/0/prod...mwVbm2eVtG6qwDgohC8_UYbQYnVH0wThoC1X8QAvD_BwE






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Top