Any other chronic racket swappers out there?

gvsbdisco

Semi-Pro
When I lose a set I usually switch to a different stick. Its lame but whatever, I'm a rec tennis player. I have a couple POG 107s, 93p, PCG100 weighted, and the Agassi Radical OS. Honestly I don't find it that difficult to switch between them. I lose equally well with all of them. I test drove an Ezone 98 and thought..."wow, this is way easier to play tennis with. Why am I swinging these logs?"
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Really depends on the player, but from my perspective playing with various racquets makes the game enjoyable. I think it improves my game as I have to learn to adapt. Players are chasing constant consitancy to the point that they don't know how to adapt. They then get upset everytime they have a slightly mishit. Temp and weather changes strings etc...distance above sea level...indoor outdoor. Manufacturing variances ... I find that sometimes when things are going wrong trying more of the same is rarely the answer...sometimes you need to change things up. Changing racquets can have the shock needed to reset a match. Personally I think every player should learn how to play with at least two racquets.
I've given my game a decent jolt with a racquet swap on more occasions than I can count. I don't think that everybody should carry different frames in their bag just because it's worked for me, but I don't think it's something to be afraid of as long as you do it right. If your racquet options are a constant distraction, that's not so good. Try sticking with one for at least a few outings. But I do believe that different racquets can be potentially better for some different settings.

I keep two different models from the same company with me, so they have very similar grip shapes. That makes swapping out rather easy because they're both pretty familiar feeling in my hands. They also have very similar weights and balances, so they maneuver and swing around in a predictable way. One model gives me easier power, which is great when I need to slug with some of the stronger kids I coach. The other model gives me less inherent power from the same swings, but it gives me much more spin potential and also has a great punchy feel around the net. So the spin factory can be ideal for teaching/feeding, hitting with more consistency on clay courts, and I usually like that one for heavy doubles.

It's not rare for me to be in the middle of a hit or a set of singles or doubles though, and feel like I'm a little off. I don't switch frames all the time, but usually when I do, it wakes up my tennis DNA a little bit.

Playing with different racquets can be fun - fun is good - but frames having different weights and balances will swing differently through the ball. My frames are sort of heavy and also pretty head-light, but when I've tried to serve with more of a middleweight racquet having much less head-light balance, it's noticeable to me just how much further forward I need to locate my toss - several inches - just to keep my serve down in the court. Even though a lighter racquet might be easier to accelerate, it will naturally release to a different contact point if it's more than a couple points less head-light than another. That's where the swap might be trouble if the swing tempo to a certain contact point works for one racquet in the bag, but another one requires its own timing and tempo to meet the ball at a different contact point.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
-tonight i hit for about an hour
-i had 5 rakets with me
-3x w.k.blade.tours, strung with multis/all-diff. head/yonex/wilson; felt great, comfortable, lots of pop and plenty of control
-the blades have been in my closet for a LONG time, i was surpriced they played so well tonight
-1x y.dual.g, strung with soft poly; felt great, lots of control, pop
-1x y.vcore.95, strung with babo.origin,, felt like crap; time to restring and regrip, no tac on the grip; winter time grips needed

-anyway, i went through all 5x rakets tonight!!
-the people i hit with, know by now that i am constantly switching sticks

-5x sticks for 1 hitting session is my max!!, ive taken more before,, but never got a chance to go through em all
-tomorrow ill provably take another 4-5 different ones (out to hit)
-like i said before : " so many racquets, so little time!" :)o_O(y)
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
Golf has specialized clubs for the different shots that need to be made. No reason that tennis wouldn't work the same way.
Oh noooo, I respectfully disagree with this statement. Tennis and golf are completely different sports. I do think and agree that with any sport having the right tool for the job is important. However, at some point the player has to play. Expecting a racquet to do wonders for anyone’s game isn’t realistic. The equipment is just that, a piece of equipment. Finding the best to racquet (that’s suits you and your game) and developing the skills to use that racquet are what makes tennis a challenge. Having a Swiss-Army knife of racquets will only handicap or hold back the player from truly developing the skills needed. This goes without saying, none of us are professionals, but you don’t see the top pros lining their bags with different types of racquets. They train hard, dial in with a specific racquet and make it their weapon of choice. I enjoy a healthy debate, I look forward to your response. (y)
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
I think it depends on your tennis journey. At closer to 70 than 60yrs old I like to hit with rackets I ignored or missed years ago and new sticks just to see what they feel like. Yesterday I switched off with a 107G, Ti Rad OS and Graphene 360 Extreme Pro. I'll sometimes have a Rad OS day, taking out 5 different models or a Prince day. It is sort of like going wine tasting.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
but you don’t see the top pros lining their bags with different types of racquets
But you do see them changing rackets through their career.

I think the fact that it's impractical to swap rackets is why tennis players tend to be dissatisfied and constantly looking for that magical frame that does everything well. It's a myth because every stroke would best be served by a slightly different tool. In tennis you are forced to make it work with a single frame because you can't change rackets mid point.

Having a Swiss-Army knife of racquets will only handicap or hold back the player from truly developing the skills needed.
What it does it insert variance into the equation which some people struggle to deal with. A pro in particular is very much fine tuned and would struggle. Most rec players are far less fine tuned in their games and their wins and losses are not usually coming down to the razor thin margins a pro has to deal with. Most rec players are losing because of footwork, fitness and focus issues rather than not being "dialled in with their racket".

I'm sure many players would be better off with one frame and using it well. I'm sure for many players, it makes no difference at all if they change frames. I've played the "matched frame" game and played the "Frame of the day" game. No difference in my tennis results. But a lot of difference in my enjoyment and the only con has been to my bank balance.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
-tonight i hit for about an hour
-i had 5 rakets with me
-3x w.k.blade.tours, strung with multis/all-diff. head/yonex/wilson; felt great, comfortable, lots of pop and plenty of control
-the blades have been in my closet for a LONG time, i was surpriced they played so well tonight
-1x y.dual.g, strung with soft poly; felt great, lots of control, pop
-1x y.vcore.95, strung with babo.origin,, felt like crap; time to restring and regrip, no tac on the grip; winter time grips needed

-anyway, i went through all 5x rakets tonight!!
-the people i hit with, know by now that i am constantly switching sticks

-5x sticks for 1 hitting session is my max!!, ive taken more before,, but never got a chance to go through em all
-tomorrow ill provably take another 4-5 different ones (out to hit)
-like i said before : " so many racquets, so little time!" :)o_O(y)
I really think that this is a healthier approach to the game than making a commitment to a single brand and model after a two day demo, or committing to a certain frame on the advice of a coach or friend. We really don't know what works best for us unless we experiment and compare and to me that means owning different rackets and testing them out and modifying them together to find out what they can really do. I've discovered that at this point in my life and at my current playing level, I do best with a stick in the 12 oz. ballpark, maybe one or two points headlight, 97" for one handed backhand and an old-school Head style rectangular grip (easily customized).

But then I discovered that in that ballpark, one stick (Pro One GT) may be a dream to play with but irritate my arm whereas another one (PT280) may not rate quite as high in the playing category (power and spin) but causes zero arm discomfort, and another frame (Response 97) is so muted that it can take the pace out of big topspin drives on volleys at the net and yet has plenty of plow from the baseline and ample power on serve. All usable options to have in the bag.
 
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PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I have my 18x20 days - Gravity Pro, 93P, Pure Strike Tour & Ultra Tour
&
the 16x19 days - RF97 v3, Pure Drive 2021, Pure Strike Tour
I remember watching a Taylor Fritz match recently where the announcer said that Taylor uses both 18/20 and 16/19 frames and doesn't even really distinguish between the two. Not much of a gear head they said.
 

rader023

Rookie
I usually give any new stick about a year to see if i will keep it. Sometimes i will break out and older one for a set or two just for fun (Vcore tour 89, Liquidmetal Instinct for example). I did go through a period where i demo'd like 15 racquets but i never feel like i have enough time to choose one!
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I think in the end fresh strings makes more of a difference than the frame. Just took my 107G in for stringing after 44 hrs on that string bed. Played this morning with my POG 107 with fresh strings and it was a big difference in control and feel.

So if people are advocating multiple identical matched frames only, I hope they are also advocating for re-stringing every few hours of play.
 
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PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
. I did go through a period where i demo'd like 15 racquets but i never feel like i have enough time to choose one!
That’s it in a nutshell, you have to live with the damn thing, treat her to a makeover or two - unlock her secrets. I recently picked up a lightly used Prince Response 97 based on specs and some really glowing reviews. It came newly strung with 17 g polygon at my tension 50. Not knowing anything but digging the gauge and tension I thought this is going to be heaven. It was borderline horrible and I considered giving it away or selling it but I decided to put some more money into it instead and glad I did. Total love fest right now and if it ends up in the numero uno slot, I may have to hunt down a second one.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
picked up a lightly used Prince Response 97
Are you talking about the Response 97 with the translucent rubber thingy in the throat? I had one of those once and gave it away or traded it after a week or two. On the other hand grab a Graphtech DB26 or Graphtech DB110 with the rubber thingy in the throat and have a nice hit. My "holism" knows no bounds.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
Are you talking about the Response 97 with the translucent rubber thingy in the throat? I had one of those once and gave it away or traded it after a week or two. On the other hand grab a Graphtech DB26 or Graphtech DB110 with the rubber thingy in the throat and have a nice hit. My "holism" knows no bounds.
Looks like you had two or three and for a lot more than just a week according to the archive. You even launched a thread saying Fed should have considered one at one point.

 
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PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I've given my game a decent jolt with a racquet swap on more occasions than I can count. I don't think that everybody should carry different frames in their bag just because it's worked for me, but I don't think it's something to be afraid of as long as you do it right. If your racquet options are a constant distraction, that's not so good. Try sticking with one for at least a few outings. But I do believe that different racquets can be potentially better for some different settings.

I keep two different models from the same company with me, so they have very similar grip shapes. That makes swapping out rather easy because they're both pretty familiar feeling in my hands. They also have very similar weights and balances, so they maneuver and swing around in a predictable way. One model gives me easier power, which is great when I need to slug with some of the stronger kids I coach. The other model gives me less inherent power from the same swings, but it gives me much more spin potential and also has a great punchy feel around the net. So the spin factory can be ideal for teaching/feeding, hitting with more consistency on clay courts, and I usually like that one for heavy doubles.

It's not rare for me to be in the middle of a hit or a set of singles or doubles though, and feel like I'm a little off. I don't switch frames all the time, but usually when I do, it wakes up my tennis DNA a little bit.

Playing with different racquets can be fun - fun is good - but frames having different weights and balances will swing differently through the ball. My frames are sort of heavy and also pretty head-light, but when I've tried to serve with more of a middleweight racquet having much less head-light balance, it's noticeable to me just how much further forward I need to locate my toss - several inches - just to keep my serve down in the court. Even though a lighter racquet might be easier to accelerate, it will naturally release to a different contact point if it's more than a couple points less head-light than another. That's where the swap might be trouble if the swing tempo to a certain contact point works for one racquet in the bag, but another one requires its own timing and tempo to meet the ball at a different contact point.
This makes so much sense and after learning it the hard way, the reason I keep all my playing sticks in the same ballpark spec wise.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
This makes so much sense and after learning it the hard way, the reason I keep all my playing sticks in the same ballpark spec wise.
I try to keep the SW's relatively similar and grips relatively similar. And I adjust string tensions to keep the power levels relatively similar. That way the major differences are in control, feel and spin.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I try to keep the SW's relatively similar and grips relatively similar. And I adjust string tensions to keep the power levels relatively similar. That way the major differences are in control, feel and spin.
Yeah I imagined so otherwise it wouldn’t be so easy for you to swap. I did that too when I was juggling different head sizes, but I struggled with the string tension formula.o_O
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Yeah I imagined so otherwise it wouldn’t be so easy for you to swap. I did that too when I was juggling different head sizes, but I struggled with the string tension formula.o_O
Generally that's not too hard to dial in. You can generally tell from a frame's specs where the power levels will be. Between flex, beam thickness, string pattern and density, there is enough info to get a good idea. Then after I play with it, I can dial it down or up the next time. Rarely takes me more than 2 stringings to get the power dialled in.

So for instance my POG 107 with 16x19 string bed, OS size and 67 RA, I'm running gut/poly at 62/57. My Phantom 93p with a mid size frame, 18x20 string bed and 61 RA, I'm playing at 50/45 with gut/poly. My other Phantoms run in between those extremes.
 

Antónis

Professional
I have mixed feelings about swapping, I have a "go to" racquet (PS 6.0 95) since late 90's, but I fool around a lot, especially if things are going wrong.
I reduced the swap "addiction" to Slazenger Pro Braided, Dunlop AG Tour 300 4D (both weighted up a bit), PS 6.1 N-Code 18x20 and PS 6.0 85, these last two ones only from time to time, if conditions are ok.
Definitely, I'm a braided graphite fibers fan, that's what they all have in common...
 

cortado

Semi-Pro
I only have 2 different racquets. One 97, one 90. Same balance. 97 is 10g lighter than 90. All that swapping does is confirm that I can play reasonably well with both and I need to just stick to one. Strangely the 97 feels slower/heavier even though its 10g lighter and same balance.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I have mixed feelings about swapping, I have a "go to" racquet (PS 6.0 95) since late 90's, but I fool around a lot, especially if things are going wrong.
I reduced the swap "addiction" to Slazenger Pro Braided, Dunlop AG Tour 300 4D (both weighted up a bit), PS 6.1 N-Code 18x20 and PS 6.0 85, these last two ones only from time to time, if conditions are ok.
Definitely, I'm a braided graphite fibers fan, that's what they all have in common...
You have some real classic frames there. Given the opportunity I’d definitely give any of those a spin. I had a PS 6.1 something or other back in the day but it definitely wasn’t braided. Love the feel of the original 85!
 

Antónis

Professional
I only have 2 different racquets. One 97, one 90. Same balance. 97 is 10g lighter than 90. All that swapping does is confirm that I can play reasonably well with both and I need to just stick to one. Strangely the 97 feels slower/heavier even though its 10g lighter and same balance.
That's not strange, small head sized racquets are way faster than bigger head sized racquets. Usually, smaller ones are thinnest too, and more head-light
 

Antónis

Professional
You have some real classic frames there. Given the opportunity I’d definitely give any of those a spin. I had a PS 6.1 something or other back in the day but it definitely wasn’t braided. Love the feel of the original 85!
If this makes you happy, I never had the chance to playtest a PT 630/280. I do have a PC classic 600 mid, made in Austria, I hit a bit with the Prestige MP, but never with a PT 630/280. Shame on me...
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
I was like this. Couldn’t find the one. And so kept on convincing myself racket x was the one, and then getting frustrated, and then switching, and then frustrating. But now with the pro staff 95, there isn’t a single other racquet I would rather use. Absolute perfection for me. I think it’s just the process of finding that one frame you adore.
 

Antónis

Professional
The Pro Braided feels like a very light 6.1 classic, the AG 300 Tour hits a bit like a Prestige MP, but a bit "flexier" and more forgiving (it's a real 98 sq.i.)
For some reason, I feel those old Dunlops hit like more forgiving Head Prestige. Try the MW 95, if you have the chance. For me, feels something between PC 600 mid and MP
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
The Pro Braided feels like a very light 6.1 classic, the AG 300 Tour hits a bit like a Prestige MP, but a bit "flexier" and more forgiving (it's a real 98 sq.i.)
For some reason, I feel those old Dunlops hit like more forgiving Head Prestige. Try the MW 95, if you have the chance. For me, feels something between PC 600 mid and MP
Dude, you’re giving me gas big time. “So many rackets so little time.” At least they’re cheaper than guitars, but that’s a story for another day.:unsure:
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
-btw, if one is not likely to be a ,"racket-swapper" one can now be a "string-swapper" !!
-so many strings, so little time! :laughing: (y) :eek:
Now that’s a whole nother ball of wax and like those of you that claim you’ve found your magic wand, I’ve found my string. Nothing but crossfire ZX 17 for me - problem solved!:cool:
 

Antónis

Professional
I was like this. Couldn’t find the one. And so kept on convincing myself racket x was the one, and then getting frustrated, and then switching, and then frustrating. But now with the pro staff 95, there isn’t a single other racquet I would rather use. Absolute perfection for me. I think it’s just the process of finding that one frame you adore.
I play with PS 95 original since late 90's, I collected a total of 9 racquets, this is more than most marriages
At least I can fool around without complains...
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I play with PS 95 original since late 90's, I collected a total of 9 racquets, this is more than most marriages
At least I can fool around without complains...
I heard that a lot of pros still use that frame. I guess if you’re going to stockpile, that’s a great place to start.
 

Antónis

Professional
I heard that a lot of pros still use that frame. I guess if you’re going to stockpile, that’s a great place to start.
Dolgopolov still plays (?) with this racquet, with a special 18x17 drilling. There's an old french player called Stephan Robert, I saw him play once and I'm pretty sure he had a 6.0 95 in his hands. And there should be more
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
I only have 2 different racquets. One 97, one 90. Same balance. 97 is 10g lighter than 90. All that swapping does is confirm that I can play reasonably well with both and I need to just stick to one. Strangely the 97 feels slower/heavier even though its 10g lighter and same balance.
Well 90” is a bit undersized for today’s game. That being said, the smaller head size is awesome to train with. I’d kind of forgotten about my 88” Kneissl Artamiic Pro 25 for a minute but took it out for some service practice the other day. The following day using my Response 97 in the round robin group I put my first serve in for a service winner and proceeded in kind with an excellent service rhythm all day. And it was windy as heck, which can mess with my timing big time.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
Dolgopolov still plays (?) with this racquet, with a special 18x17 drilling. There's an old french player called Stephan Robert, I saw him play once and I'm pretty sure he had a 6.0 95 in his hands. And there should be more
I think Rubilev may be back on his cause it’s all blacked out.
 

smalahove

Hall of Fame
I don't think such a mythical beast exists. i believe that, for every individual, every shot likely has an ideal racket spec. The mechanics are so different it's highly unlikely that a single racket will perform superbly on every shot. So all rackets have pros and cons.

Would anyone try to drive the golf ball with a sand wedge? Or hit a sand shot with driver? Golf has specialized clubs for the different shots that need to be made. No reason that tennis wouldn't work the same way. Shots that require more control (slices, angled and drop volleys, drop shots) will be performed better by control frames and shots that need more power (flat serves, BH and FH groundies) will be performed better by power frames.

So I like to acquire rackets that are good all-rounders (control oriented tweeners and modern player's frames) and carry a quiver of rackets that suit your needs for a certain day. Some days you need more forgiveness. A bigger sweet spot might suit you that day. Some days you are seeing the ball well but are wanting more control. A tight string bed might be the solution.
That's a great point, and explains why you love your weapon of choice against that one opponent, where the matchup offers you all the right shots for that frame. And then you scratch your head when nothing works in the next matchup, often because the matchups dictates other skills and different shot selection.

For me this often translates to loving a frame against medium pace opponents, where I have more time and incoming balls are not that penetrating. Then facing a super heavy hitter, and finding out there is little stability in the frame. Or being able to punish the opponent with incessant top spin, then facing the low net clearance super hard and flat hitter, that also loves low and fast slices :)
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
For me this often translates to loving a frame against medium pace opponents, where I have more time and incoming balls are not that penetrating. Then facing a super heavy hitter, and finding out there is little stability in the frame.
Exactly. I love my 93P when I'm playing pushers or lower level players as I've got more time to set up and when i do, the small sweet spot doesn't hurt me. And the control and balance of the frame allow me to unleash my best full stroke FH's into small windows and take over the game. Against the stringer player that same small sweetspot gets me in trouble and on defense. So then I'm better off with my POG 107 where I can just use a short strokes and deflect pace back deep using the intrinsic plow of the frame.

I've definitely had matches where I walked away saying, "I wish i'd brought X racket with me today." I probably would have still lost but I'd have competed better.
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
-so many strings, so little time! :laughing: (y)
Truth.

I get teased often because I generally carry six racquets - least three different models with different string setups, at various static weights - when I head out to play. Generally speaking I agree with @Dartagnan64 when he said, "I think in the end fresh strings makes more of a difference than the frame." I always start with a fresh strung racquet and then may change if I need a stiffer frame to block back hard shots or something lighter because I'm not prepping early enough or hex/triangle shaped strings for those guys with heavy backspin slices.

Generally that's not too hard to dial in. You can generally tell from a frame's specs where the power levels will be. Between flex, beam thickness, string pattern and density, there is enough info to get a good idea. Then after I play with it, I can dial it down or up the next time. Rarely takes me more than 2 stringings to get the power dialled in.
Ditto. Although, with so many different string on the market and an infinite number of hybrids that can be installed, it takes me longer to decide what string or two strings top put in a racquet than it does to actually string it.
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
Truth.

I get teased often because I generally carry six racquets - least three different models with different string setups, at various static weights - when I head out to play. Generally speaking I agree with @Dartagnan64 when he said, "I think in the end fresh strings makes more of a difference than the frame." I always start with a fresh strung racquet and then may change if I need a stiffer frame to block back hard shots or something lighter because I'm not prepping early enough or hex/triangle shaped strings for those guys with heavy backspin slices.
Yeah, ultimately it should be about styles and game planning, I mean if you're playing the sport as a competitive endeavor right? I haven't played league in like twenty years but in the four groups I play with, not one is noncompetitive in nature. We want the sets to be competitive and so we do our best to offset abilities in our pairings. So why would we not want to play on a racket that gives us the best competitive advantage going in? I found that racket in the PT280 twenty five years ago. The best I'd ever found, and yet I still found myself experimenting with other frames from time to time. But that technology got old as did I and I found myself blaming the frame again. Bought a tweener (2X Prince Beast 98) and thought it was the best thing since sliced bread til I didn't. But in the thrill of the moment I traded two of those PT280s away for a couple of Donnay Pro One GTs. Liked em straight away as they were basically PT280s on steroids with easier power and better spin potential with the 16/19. Then I realized that it was never a problem with the technology getting profoundly better and surpassing the PT280, but more a problem of my just throwing an overgrip on a worn out grip. Put a nice head rubber grip on it and left off the over grip and wala, I could find my bevels again! So now I've got three players and can't make up my mind, solution pick up another frame to further muddy the waters - enter Prince Response 97. It's an endless cycle, seriously and I am proud of myself for not buying a friend's Pure Strike Tour over the weekend - actually the grip was too small or I probably would have. But the point is this, I'll either find a use for each of them or I'll move on, but in the meantime I've never had so many nice sticks!
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
Played two sets of dubs with my Beast 98s this afternoon. I have to admit that I've been neglecting this stick for a couple of weeks as it's my only tweener and my only 98 (the rest are 97s). But this stick will always have a place in my heart and in my bag. This is a great racket from all areas of the court and though it's heavily leaded up, still a tad lighter than my others. Great for starting out with if I haven't picked up a stick for a few days or I just don't feel like swinging a log. We won both sets and I thought we were done and a friend was sticking around to hit so I swapped it out for my recently acquired Prince Response 97. Well, the guy that was leaving changed his mind at the last second so we split it up putting the two lefties on the same side. I played with the Response and didn't have any trouble adjusting. Gotta say that this stick is particularly good at spin - my slice serve was taking like never before and squirting out really low, kickers were effective as well. We were tied at threes when we called it for darkness. Keeping them all!!!:love:
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
@PT280 Fan I feel like swapping sticks frequently is almost half fun (perhaps moreso, as I get older and older).. Also probably why most of us dweebs waste time on these boards instead of working..
I used to waste time on a Jazz basketball site but every year the same thing. At least here I can talk openly about the sport I love and share trade secrets. That **** never gets old.:cautious:
 

PT280 Fan

Semi-Pro
Depending on court type, I use different racquet though not so much different in spec (95-97 sq inch, 320s swingweight).
Pretty much where I’m at as well. I mean I haven’t actually run them through a machine or anything but roughly the same balance, all 97 and 98 and all within about 5/10ths of an ounce.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Well I’m currently in love with my Phantom 107G. It’s performing so well in my doubles matches, especially when freshly strung. Just doing everything well and playing to my strengths and forgiving my weaknesses.

i‘m surprised more guys in my age group don’t look seriously at players OS rackets.
 
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