Anybody knows about Yonex R-24 and R-50?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by tandayu, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. tandayu

    tandayu Professional

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    The light blue R-24 is made of Graphite/kevlar. That is all I know. Is the R-50 used by Pat Cash (also blue)? Any difference?
     
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  2. Kirko

    Kirko Hall of Fame

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    Pam Shriver used the 24 . I demoed them when they came out and was very dismayed they vibrated badly even with a dampner.
     
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  3. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    Tried them when they came out as well. I thought the R-24 was an average frame, quite weighty but with a lot more power than the R-22 and R-23 but nowhere near as playable and mainly a baseliner's frame (unlike the earlier models which were good at net). The R-50 was a massive disappointment. Cash replaced his Prince Magnesium Pro with it but the Yonex wasn't in the same league. Far too heavy to be good at net, too much vibration to be comfortable from the baseline and sluggish all-round. It came and went quite quickly here in Australia as the Cash fans who'd jumped from the Prince found it was a very limited frame. Lots of power from the baseline and loads of spin but not worth the money.
     
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  4. tandayu

    tandayu Professional

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    Thank you for the information. Do you know about other Yonex R-7, R-10, R-23? I only know that R-22 was the tool of Martina Navratilova & Andres Gomez.
     
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  5. Kirko

    Kirko Hall of Fame

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    R-10 Vince Van Patten used it for a few yrs. then returned to the POG.
     
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  6. b.

    b. Rookie

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    I had pleasure of using R7 and R50.

    R7 for a longer period of time. So long that I can not say if it is heavy, maneuverable or not. For me it was - a racquet. I got used to it and it did everything well. It was layered with lots of head protection tape, and with a dampener it didn't vibrate.

    Sweetspot was moved toward the handle from geometric head center. Upper hoop did produce shock when freshly strung, and was not overly responsive, but I didn't care - I used sweetspot, as usualy.

    R50 was even nicer for me. It played with synthetic gut just like R7 with natural gut. It has good touch, but when you give a ball good whipping (serve for example), it becomes a tweener.

    I can not be totaly objective since I got used to those racquets, but I will dare to say they were not worse than average "top" line of racquets that I encountered (Wilson, Head...). Maybe diffrent, just like any of racquets differ from other.

    What I didn't like is paintjob. On R7 it wasn't so important, since it was covered with tapes (head).
     
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  7. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

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    tandayu,
    the R-22 was more flexible than the R-23 but I always felt it was a nicer racquet to play with. I dont really like the Yonex headshape but it was quite nice to play with - good spin, not super powerful, good at net. The R-7 felt 'bigger' than the other two and felt quite 'tinny' to me with quite a bit of vibration. Still, Im not a Yonex fan so probably never had the right 'feel' with the racquets. All I can say for sure is that a lot of people loved them, more so the R-7 and R-22 out here in Australia.
     
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  8. b.

    b. Rookie

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    I should add: R7 was sensitive to string type and tension. Maybe it was consequence of a head size and not dense pattern. At least I had that impression. It was the main reason why I gave up on it - I started to play rarely, and had to restring almost every time before session. It becomes a slingshot with a certain strings on low tension.

    Concerning unfortunate R50's destiny (I didn't know about it, which is no wonder), besides most obvious reason that it wasn't suitable racquet for lots of users, I may notice that being a "replacement" racquet is not very promising role. Even for recreational players, if they have find common grounds with their racquets. Pros are even more sensitive to slight changes, and it is unlikely that they will endorse replacement racquet, unless it is 100% copy, or allready wanted change.
    Look at the Federer - he haven't changed his racquet to it's successor, although people on this board were not sure if anything is changed, except name and cosmetics (first impressions).
     
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  9. tacoben

    tacoben Semi-Pro

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    I recently came upon a used Yonex R 7 at a local Goodwill store for $5.00. Damm, I love the way it hits! Love it so much that I ended up getting another on on E-bay for $9.00. These racquets are marked Made in Japan. I wonder if the new ones are still made there as well?
     
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  10. dekko1

    dekko1 Semi-Pro

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    I just got myself 2 R-50s!! Both in mint condition, but one has a small crack :(
    Swapped them for an MP tour 1 (I had a few).
    I also hit with one of them today. Great classic feel, not a very big sweet spot, but when u find it, it's an amazing feeling. I love the weight and balance too. I'll post some photos when I get a chance.
     
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  11. Princeofwails

    Princeofwails New User

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    Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I have been playing with a couple of R-7's over the winter. This one is a tad bigger than the other rexkings. Serious plow through, great at the net and baseline.
     
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  12. mhkeuns

    mhkeuns Hall of Fame

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    I luckily picked up Yonex R-22, Yonex R-50, and Head TXP Pro all in excellent condition. Out of the three, I am not familiar with R-50 at all, but honestly, it felt really good to hit with - easy to swing, nice feel on impact and excellent control. Power is there when needed, too.

    Do we have any Yonex experts here who can tell me the specs of both R-22 & R-50? I am familiar with the TXP and am more interested in finding a bit more about the R-50 & R-22 for that matter.

    Though I keep hearing that the modern racquets have so much power compared to the rackets of the past from the tennis broadcasters, I am surprised at the power those old classics can generate. The Head Prestige Pro/TXP Pro from the 80's actually has more power and just as great in control as their newer models. The old ones just weigh more but are balanced perfectly.
     
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  13. Crocodile

    Crocodile Hall of Fame

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    Yes both frames were released in the late 80's. My experience with them was that the R50 was a more flexible control oriented frame and the R24 was a little more lively and easier to use, although in today's terms none of this would matter because they are both very agricultural, with a lot of vibration and not much power.
     
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  14. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    Loved my R-50, until I shanked an overhead with it & sheared the throat. Big bummer was I had just had it restrung w/ Africord. $40 down the drain, and back then, that was a lot of $$$...
     
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  15. travlerajm

    travlerajm Legend

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    I picked up an r22 recently.

    The old yonexes, once you add enough weight to the hoop, tend to feel more solid than modern racquets in part because they are shorter, measuring 26.75" in stock form.

    My leaded up r22 is a great all around old school feeling frame. If it were a little wider ( and more forgiving for defense ) I would consider using it as my regular frame in competition. Something about my r22 just works great on serve and volley tennis.
     
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  16. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo Talk Tennis Guru

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    Surprised no one mentions that these older Yonex racquets come in different weights which also increases with the grip size. A medium Yonex usually weighed over 13 oz.
     
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