Anybody still using a "Classic" racket (1990s and earlier) as their main racket?

Dufflefan

New User
This is a fascinating thread; lots of memories of old friends' racquets (and old friends!) surfacing!

I still have my Yonex Super RD Tour 90s. I no longer hit with them, but I liked them so much I've never sold them. I had three frames and was still using them full-time until about 2004 with no intention of playing with any other racquet but one developed a small crack. I remember I was using a multifilament string which I really liked but it had a very short lifespan and ultimately two frames and a string which wore/broke so quickly, meant I had to change racquets.



I changed to the Wilson nSix-One Tour 90 which I still hit with today full-time (and despite the usual chips and scratches, none of the frames have any cracks). I know these are from 2004 - so certainly not the 1990s - but I'm still very happy with them 17 years on! Whether my elbow and shoulder will continue to be happy with them in the near future remains unclear!

 

vandre

Hall of Fame
Tour 1

I still waffle between it and the Clash to save my auld arms.
i hear that. i had to step down from my tour 1s and even my tour 1 xls because my shoulder felt like a pretzel after 10 minutes of hitting.
 
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WYK

Hall of Fame
i hear that. i had to step down from my tour 1s and even my tour 1 xls because my shoulder felt like a pretzel after 10 minutes of hitting.




I just have to work so much more for my serve with the RQIS compared to the Clash is the main reason. I start to feel it in my shoulder and arm. It's amazing the difference a few grams(and more power) make.
Also, even though the RQIS are rated much higher RA at 61 VS 54, the Yonex play much more plush on ground strokes.
 

retrowagen

Hall of Fame
Snauwaert Golden Dyno? Now I just need to find a second one.
That’s a fabulous racquet; such tactile feel. I have one of each of the mid-80’s Snauwaert mids and Dyno series frames in my permanent collection; they are all fabulous frames, but require a classic style of play (and a level of fitness that is getting further away from my middle-aged body)
 

slipgrip93

Semi-Pro
Haha. It was for a good cause. I grew up watching/idolizing Pete, patterned my serve and FH after him. Then fell in love with Fed circa 2006. So, only fitting that I should own a PS85. So, thanks? lol
When I started to get back into tennis in 2014, I went for the ps85 reissue (and discovered this site). I stubbornly used and tried to learn with it until last year when I switched to a kps88. (when the tennis elbow pain gets too much, I occasionally use the KTour 95). yes, same, I tried for years to try to emulate Pete's flat serve. Now I'd given up trying to pattern most of my other strokes after pros , except slightly Graf slice, and slightly Fed high-ball slam/drive-volley, trying to that is.

This thread just cost me a chunk of money.
Oh geez, for me similarly, just since last week on a whim I entered a bid on an nTour six one 90 which had a big chip. Turned out my low bid was the only one. So I completed the payment yesterday (ugh shipping) and it's being shipped to add to my collection as my first Fed type racquet (other than the general ps85 type I guess). I hope it's not internally cracked, will see soon. Softer strings I have in mind for this one, and what a coincident thread this is in my case.
 
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georgeyew

Rookie
Most of the sticks that I play with are from the 80's. Currently in my rotation are the Prokennex Silver Ace 90, Fox Graphite Pro WB-210, Dunlop Max 300i, Yamaha Secret 06, Wilson Ultra 2 Mid, Wilson Ultra PFK, Prince POG OS. I know these racquets cover the whole spectrum and have not much in common. But each seems to have something unique that keeps making me want to keep it around.

It's not unusual for me to use 5+ racquets in a hitting session. It frustrates some of my partners since each racquet plays so differently.
 

Connorsfan

New User
Almost had to re-add myself to this list with another addition today. Found a Woodie at the Thrift Shop for $7. I literally just sold the one I found in my dad’s bag and still had to firmly put my hands in my pockets and walk out of the store. Another 90 seconds staring at that thing and it would have been restrung, wearing a fresh leather grip and living in my bag.
 

Grieeegoorr

Rookie
Most of the sticks that I play with are from the 80's. Currently in my rotation are the Prokennex Silver Ace 90, Fox Graphite Pro WB-210, Dunlop Max 300i, Yamaha Secret 06, Wilson Ultra 2 Mid, Wilson Ultra PFK, Prince POG OS. I know these racquets cover the whole spectrum and have not much in common. But each seems to have something unique that keeps making me want to keep it around.

It's not unusual for me to use 5+ racquets in a hitting session. It frustrates some of my partners since each racquet plays so differently.
Lovely mixed bag you carry there
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
This is a fascinating thread; lots of memories of old friends' racquets (and old friends!) surfacing!

I still have my Yonex Super RD Tour 90s. I no longer hit with them, but I liked them so much I've never sold them. I had three frames and was still using them full-time until about 2004 with no intention of playing with any other racquet but one developed a small crack. I remember I was using a multifilament string which I really liked but it had a very short lifespan and ultimately two frames and a string which wore/broke so quickly, meant I had to change racquets.



I changed to the Wilson nSix-One Tour 90 which I still hit with today full-time (and despite the usual chips and scratches, none of the frames have any cracks). I know these are from 2004 - so certainly not the 1990s - but I'm still very happy with them 17 years on! Whether my elbow and shoulder will continue to be happy with them in the near future remains unclear!

SRD-95 saved my elbow, still have pr.
 

OscarCh

New User
This is the thread I was needing.

I started playing again this year after about 15 years. I played a lot as a kid, 37 yo now.

When I started playing again this year I just didnt know what racquet to buy, and couldnt demo, so basically I just used my old racquets from the 90'. One is a Wilson graphite aggressor, 95 and 12 oz, the other a Prince Graphite II mid plus, 97 and also 12 oz or so.

My question is, is it a good idea to use these racquets or I would do better with more modern ones?
 
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Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
This is the thread I was needing.

I started playing again this year after about 15 years. I played a lot as a kid, 37 yo now.

When I started playing again this year I just didnt know what racquet to buy, and couldnt demo, so basically I just used my old racquets from the 90'. One is a Wilson graphite aggressor, 95 and 12 oz, the other a Prince Graphite II mid plus, 97 and also 12 oz or so.

My question is, is it a good idea to use these racquets or I would so better with more modern ones?
Run what you brung
 

Grieeegoorr

Rookie
This is the thread I was needing.

I started playing again this year after about 15 years. I played a lot as a kid, 37 yo now.

When I started playing again this year I just didnt know what racquet to buy, and couldnt demo, so basically I just used my old racquets from the 90'. One is a Wilson graphite aggressor, 95 and 12 oz, the other a Prince Graphite II mid plus, 97 and also 12 oz or so.

My question is, is it a good idea to use these racquets or I would do better with more modern ones?
There are lots of great racquets on the market right now, but it is not like it was in 1980 where manufacturers were transitioning from wood and aluminium to graphite. Racquet technology hasn't really moved on that much from when you left the game.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I feel a little ridiculous using a racquet with Wawrinka specs... and smaller and heavier than Nadal's... but whatever floats my boat I guess
Only feel ridiculous if I bring out the heavy lumber only to fail to keep up the pace.
 

WYK

Hall of Fame
There are lots of great racquets on the market right now, but it is not like it was in 1980 where manufacturers were transitioning from wood and aluminium to graphite. Racquet technology hasn't really moved on that much from when you left the game.
Exactly. They have found some ways to make them a bit more stable at lighter weights, but that's about it, really. Not much has changed.
In fact, if you look at some of what's on offer, Gravity's, Prince 95's/97's/100's, Radicals, Prestiges, Dunlop CX 200, even Pure Drives - they are rather similar to the racquets available 20 years ago. My first hit with a pure drive was 2004? I used to hit with a Diablo as well.
Today I use a Prince Tour 98, which in essence is an EXO version of a Microgel Radical beam crossed with maybe a hyper 6.1 inspired hoop cross section, with a Prestige MP over all head shape and throat in 16X20(But I string it 16X19). You see a lot of frankenstein sticks like these out there now. Just massage what works, because why not?
Most players sticks you see now are nearly unchanged or copies of classic sticks just tweaked a bit here and there because they just work.

 
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retrowagen

Hall of Fame
Exactly. They have found some ways to make them a bit more stable at lighter weights, but that's about it, really. Not much has changed.
In fact, if you look at some of what's on offer, Gravity's, Prince 95's/97's/100's, Radicals, Prestiges, Dunlop CX 200, even Pure Drives - they are rather similar to the racquets available 20 years ago. My first hit with a pure drive was 2004? I used to hit with a Diablo as well.
Today I use a Prince Tour 98, which in essence is an EXO version of a Microgel Radical beam crossed with maybe a hyper 6.1 inspired hoop cross section, with a Prestige MP over all head shape and throat in 16X20(But I string it 16X19). You see a lot of frankenstein sticks like these out there now. Just massage what works, because why not?
Most players sticks you see now are nearly unchanged or copies of classic sticks just tweaked a bit here and there because they just work.

Those Prince Tour 98 16x20’s are almost (EXO holes aside) a millimeter-perfect copy of the Fischer Vacuum Pro Classic 98. I played a season with the “spin” variant of the same frame when they first came out, and as a Fischer aficionado (aFischionado?), I noticed a similarity immediately.
 

JRW911

New User
I have four Prince Spectrum Comp 90s that I use as my main sticks. The oldest one has a copyright date of 1985 on the side.

I much prefer the SC 90s over my POG 90s due to it's slightly flexier frame (mid 60s RA vs high 60s RA) which makes it feel less like I'm hitting with a board.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I have four Prince Spectrum Comp 90s that I use as my main sticks. The oldest one has a copyright date of 1985 on the side.

I much prefer the SC 90s over my POG 90s due to it's slightly flexier frame (mid 60s RA vs high 60s RA) which makes it feel less like I'm hitting with a board.
Still have a NOS SC 90. Use the Yellow version. Prefer Yellow, even Fischers
 

JRW911

New User
I have nothing at all against modern racquets as I switched to the SC 90s from a Babolat Pure Drive +, but there's just something about swinging a headlight 12.5+ oz racquet. I grew up using Pro Staffs, so the SC 90 feel is all too familiar.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I have nothing at all against modern racquets as I switched to the SC 90s from a Babolat Pure Drive +, but there's just something about swinging a headlight 12.5+ oz racquet. I grew up using Pro Staffs, so the SC 90 feel is all too familiar.
Recall a guy who returned to tennis after nearly 20 yrs. He returned to the racquet he last used, an OS Head Genesis but strung with Champions Choice now. Gets topspin like a PD.
 

Frankc

Professional
Smart guy - smarter than I was.
Laid off tennis for 8 years or so due to a ski injury. Was using a medium flex composite Donnay mid before.
On return, picked up the new tech wide frames - has to be better, right? Wondered where my serve went - and my touch... consistency...? Must just be age. Figured it out years later... Duhh...
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Smart guy - smarter than I was.
Laid off tennis for 8 years or so due to a ski injury. Was using a medium flex composite Donnay mid before.
On return, picked up the new tech wide frames - has to be better, right? Wondered where my serve went - and my touch... consistency...? Must just be age. Figured it out years later... Duhh...
He wanted weight and headsize he was familiar with. For-mid/OSable combo
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
I likely have every control OS in 110 to 115 ever made that was made headlight with 18x20 pattern. However, my elbow started to hurt and at 66+ yrs you best not ignore that. My elbow does not hurt with these rackets: POG OS 107 Tour (107" 16x19) and Volkl Tour 10 Mid (93" 18x20). All six of these rackets weigh 12 oz and are about 4-5pts HL (no leather grips). When I feel like I am nearer 60 the 93" Volkls feel so good. When I think I need to win a point or feel closer to 70 the POG OS works pretty well.

I'm just giving you "kids" a heads up. Nothing beats a 12 oz 19mm beam a bit headlight for a nice old school hit. If you are swinging a racket like Berrettinni or Sock at 65 more power to you.

 

Frankc

Professional
Yep, you are on to something.
Medium flex, 93 head, 12.7 strung, 5 points HL with thin natural gut (mid/loose tension) in a genius 16X18 pattern in a soft frame. Well, Austrian engineers and designed/made at the foot of the Alps - did I say genius, no surprise here... Great precision, superb feel on the serve and never a twinge in my hand (my achilles heel as I age)... Head Premier Tour, MIA
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
Hey @Frankc , That is not funny:) There are no Head Premier Tours on the auction even close to my purchase point. I guess I'll just have to settle for my POG 90s x4 (14x18) and Tour 10 Mids x3 (18x20). I even had a pair of ROK 93s and really tried hard to like them, but gave them away down at the courts.
 

Frankc

Professional
These MIA frames used to be dirt cheap. Some key reviewers really disliked the racquet and many took that to heart. In my mind, the Premier Tour is definitely not a PT 630 or PT 280 and many saw the Premier as the PT630 replacement. Maybe that was Head's fault with the paint jobs, but so be it. All I know is that , well into seniordom, a PT 630 would be too much for me, and the Premier is one lively, dynamic frame for me when strung right. Superb precision and power for a more linear game - loads of feel with good gut...
A few years ago, they went for almost nothing and I did get two with Italian red clay under the head guard ( Pemiers are more popular with good players in the EU). Got a bunch a few years ago. Some recent good reviews may have upped the value - there never were many of these beauties around... enjoy
 
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socallefty

Legend
What kind of phones, computers do you guys use and what cars do you drive?:)

PS: If I can find my Max300G from 1983 or 1984, who wants it?
 

JRW911

New User
Are the heavier racquets of the 90's more powerful than today's sticks?
I wouldn't necessarily say so. Just depends on the user's playing level, swing style, strength, etc. For me, personally, I have somewhat loopy strokes and am in shape to the point where a light 12 oz racquet doesn't feel heavy, so I benefit from the extra mass. Someone that either has compact, whippy strokes or isn't in shape probably would not benefit from the specs of a lot of older racquets.

What kind of phones, computers do you guys use and what cars do you drive?:)

PS: If I can find my Max300G from 1983 or 1984, who wants it?
2017 Subaru Outback and Samsung Galaxy S9 (used to have an S10 but traded phones with the wife :mad:)
 

flanker2000fr

Hall of Fame
When I started playing tennis again 5 years ago after a 25 years hiatus, I made the Kneissl White Star Pro Masters my racquet of choice for about 3 months. Then I got my *ss whopped at the 4th round of a tournament by a guy who was playing too fast for me to have a chance with a 75 sq.in. frame. I therefore tried a lot of frames over the past few years before settling on the Angell TC95.

But I still love to take the Kneissl out for a drive from time to time. A few weeks ago, I played a game on grass with it, and absolutely loved it. It must have been one of the most challenging game I ever played, having to deal with an extremely inconsistent bounce (this wasn't the perfect grass of Queen's or Wimbledon) with such a small frame.
 

AleYeah

New User
New user/first post here. A silver lining of working from home the past year and a half has been taking up tennis again... after a 15 year break from the game!

A bag buried deep in the garage was like a time capsule for my four Head Pro Tour 280s which I bought off a college kid who got some kinda sponsorship with a different brand in 1998 or 1999. I’m unsure of their exact vintage. (They are “Made in Austria” if that’s a clue.)

After a little TLC in the form of new grips and strings- the latter courtesy of another relic, my ancient Klippermate stringer that I got several years before the rackets- I was in business. They still play and feel great, although admittedly part of the reason I finally signed up here was to begin looking into whether there was were more “modern” rackets I should check out that might have a similar feel.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
New user/first post here. A silver lining of working from home the past year and a half has been taking up tennis again... after a 15 year break from the game!

A bag buried deep in the garage was like a time capsule for my four Head Pro Tour 280s which I bought off a college kid who got some kinda sponsorship with a different brand in 1998 or 1999. I’m unsure of their exact vintage. (They are “Made in Austria” if that’s a clue.)

After a little TLC in the form of new grips and strings- the latter courtesy of another relic, my ancient Klippermate stringer that I got several years before the rackets- I was in business. They still play and feel great, although admittedly part of the reason I finally signed up here was to begin looking into whether there was were more “modern” rackets I should check out that might have a similar feel.
Nah
 

Grieeegoorr

Rookie
New user/first post here. A silver lining of working from home the past year and a half has been taking up tennis again... after a 15 year break from the game!

A bag buried deep in the garage was like a time capsule for my four Head Pro Tour 280s which I bought off a college kid who got some kinda sponsorship with a different brand in 1998 or 1999. I’m unsure of their exact vintage. (They are “Made in Austria” if that’s a clue.)

After a little TLC in the form of new grips and strings- the latter courtesy of another relic, my ancient Klippermate stringer that I got several years before the rackets- I was in business. They still play and feel great, although admittedly part of the reason I finally signed up here was to begin looking into whether there was were more “modern” rackets I should check out that might have a similar feel.
Congratulations you have rediscovered the holly grail, if you have fallen deeply for that feel then you will be sadly disappointed by the current models that are available. Stock up on grommets and look after those treasures and when you honestly feel that you are finally to old and slow to effectively wield them you should generate enough income from selling them to fund a quite comfortable retirement in the Bahamas.
 
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