Anyone else here not really interested in new frames or all of this "must have" technology?

#1
Every time my game develops or my tastes change, I find myself discovering slightly older model racquets with specs that fit the bill. I always end up buying either lightly used, or NOS frames from 2-6 years ago or so. Anyone else here find new racquets to be overkill and just not a good investment? I mean regardless of income, dropping $200+ on the latest release because it has that crazy new, must have Nanometric Gel, or GrapheneXT or whatever is a bit ridiculous lol. It is all a bunch of marketing hype, and people fall for it by the thousands. Not to say that the tech is bad, but its not much different or better than whats already out there.

I am much more content to spend half that and get equally as good of a racquet from a few years ago and never look back. My most recent acquisitions are a Donnay Pro One 18x20 and a Prince Tour Pro 98. They're both fantastic sticks, and I got both of them NEW for the price of one 2018 racquet on the shelf. You can't go wrong there :)
 
#2
Wow ! I have had this same epiphany myself .... the “new” sticks just don’t cut it and are somewhat watered down .

However , I must say that my game revolves around 12 ounce sticks , so when a second hand Prince Exo3 Ignite 95 became available on the net .... I grabbed it !

They don’t make em like they used to !!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
#3
I couldn't agree more. Where is all of this technology when you cut the racquets in half and all you see is fiberglass. It must be in the paint. Hahaha! IMO a racquets characteristics are mainly in it's stiffness rating and head size. I think the manufacturers just change the stiffness around, apply a new paint job and call it a new breakthrough in technology. BTW, I came on here looking for my next stick! Hahaha!
 
#5
Here at the NC 4.0 championships and the biggest serve I have seen from anyone 4.0 or 4.5 was hit with a prince exo 16 18. So much for that stick being a noodle. Don’t get me wrong, lots of stuff frames providing people with extra pop for sure, but the driver is more important than the race car.
 
#7
Here at the NC 4.0 championships and the biggest serve I have seen from anyone 4.0 or 4.5 was hit with a prince exo 16 18. So much for that stick being a noodle. Don’t get me wrong, lots of stuff frames providing people with extra pop for sure, but the driver is more important than the race car.
That prince is a noodle! :)
 
#8
That prince is a noodle! :)
Some folks can whip a noodle around pretty nicely.

I think most of the current “technology” is junk. It’s marketing. Some of it makes a difference but often neither for the better or worse. Just different.

I can pull out an old POG 107 and it feels and plays almost the same as my SW104 Blade.

In the end if you make a nicely balanced HL frame with quality graphite, that’s all you need. But brands need to convince you to buy something new.

The racket I’m enjoying most right now, the Phantom 93P is a total throwback to the Head Prestige Mids and Wilson PS90 era rackets.
 
#9
Some folks can whip a noodle around pretty nicely.

I think most of the current “technology” is junk. It’s marketing. Some of it makes a difference but often neither for the better or worse. Just different.

I can pull out an old POG 107 and it feels and plays almost the same as my SW104 Blade.

In the end if you make a nicely balanced HL frame with quality graphite, that’s all you need. But brands need to convince you to buy something new.

The racket I’m enjoying most right now, the Phantom 93P is a total throwback to the Head Prestige Mids and Wilson PS90 era rackets.
Yup. Mats wilander won a bunch of grand slams with the rossignol f200 which was even noodlier than the prince!

My main sticks are the Wilson Ultra Tour and the prince classic 100 neither of which have any new snazzy technology.
 

CopolyX

Hall of Fame
#10
I am shocked, so if I buy a new "updated" racquet for only a measly 249 bucks, with all the new stuff (extra order of hype please) in it - are you saying ; " It Won't" >>>>> make me play better, give me more power, make me more friends, give me more control, get me more dates, make my elbow pain go away, make me look like a Pro, gives me massive spin, improves my form, make more players talk about me, scare or intimidate my opponents with lesser racquets....damn..but I have to have it...I need it...it is rated so high thou....but it works for great for the play tester chris > I am exactly like him......
now..............................basically...

but.................................
We all are different.
I look at this way. Let them feed monsters. Play full price...
It is there wallet, there game..
After awhile, they may figure it out or not.
One day they may try to work on there game and not blame there equipment..but most are looking for that instant fix.
Finding the right equipment is not easy, takes a plan, time, patients, testing, and more...
How many times have you seen here, 'Help Me Find A New Racquet Please"...
Or they just play the follow the leader game...
Either way I still love the game, will continue to help and guide.
 

nvr2old

Professional
#11
Agree wholeheartedly. 99% of the sticks I have I acquired gently used from TW or the NOS couple of year old models that have fallen out of the marketing spin cycle as you say. Exception for me would be the Angells (although I have bought all of mine used here at TW) which are ironically new/old tried and true tech if you ask me.
 
#12
Whether you buy an older model or newer will depend on what specs you are after. I generally prefer the heavier more flexible frames and therefore the older frames tend fit this criteria more. Lot of the newer ones are lighter and/or stiffer which I don't like. Sometimes a new model is released that I do like so I guess it depends. Volkl and Pro Kennex still make their classic frames with the C10 and Redondo frames. With the Stan Yonex frame I still prefer the orange V Core iteration out of the 3 generations because of the mass and 62 RA.
 
#13
Don't like modern frames, especially latest ones with all these bs ''new technologies". For example the latest great Dunlop was 4D Aerogel series, for Head Prestige it was even earlier iPrestige and so on.
 
#14
All companies try to develop new material and production process, but not to give something “more” to do players. They do it to find cheaper material that can be used, sell the racquets at same or higher price and make more profit. Race for profit is constant, so we have racquets with questionable quality and feel with every “tech” generations. That is the reason most people, when comparing some older and newer frames, find that older ones are better (never mind that older ones where new, and the old ones where better). I think that around 2000` where years in peak racquet tech, after that is pretty much downhill. Of course, we as recreation players can use any racquets and have fun, but if we want to compare quality, which is another matter. And, by the way, why we need to buy new ones when we can play with “any” racquet.
 
#15
I think the cycle of new releases is just too frequent. I mean a new model every year? It reminds me of this brewery that special released itself into failure. Every month they were releasing a "special release" beer and people just lost interest. There are many examples of this, and pretty much every manufacturer seems to do it. Donnay keeps adding "cores" to their Xenecore filled racquets, and they're already up to six lol. Personally, I'm holding out for the Octo-Core ;) Yonex had some silly ones like "NanoAir Spring", and I'm sure HEAD's GrapheneXT was a marketing joke that was no better than their Graphene offerings. I am glad to see most here seem to recognize this and are not falling for the hype like most of the general public.

Whether you buy an older model or newer will depend on what specs you are after. I generally prefer the heavier more flexible frames and therefore the older frames tend fit this criteria more. Lot of the newer ones are lighter and/or stiffer which I don't like. Sometimes a new model is released that I do like so I guess it depends. Volkl and Pro Kennex still make their classic frames with the C10 and Redondo frames. With the Stan Yonex frame I still prefer the orange V Core iteration out of the 3 generations because of the mass and 62 RA.
For the most part you're right, but if you're looking for a manufacturer that is still developing new classic feeling frames, Donnay is one of the best out there. Most of theirs retain a classic feel with low flex, but they are not hollow. Most of their line is like this, aside from their Formula models.
 
#16
Looking forward to the new Headolat Pure Touchy Graphene XT Woofer Textreme Organix Ozone Ezone Optimass Radical Tour Supersize 145. Big improvement on the previous version.


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joohan

Hall of Fame
#17
but the driver is more important than the race car.
Unless you specify what level you’re talking about this quote is very inaccurate. At least if you take it literally and think motorsport...

I wouldn’t judge equipment as better or worse but more or less right for a particular player and his needs.
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
#18
Basalt & Graphene didn't do anything for me but Vcore vector shaft(fluted throat by Yonex) and PWS by Wilson actually does make a difference. Great innovations there.

I think every three or four years I want to change frames even though there is no need.
 
#19
Every time my game develops or my tastes change, I find myself discovering slightly older model racquets with specs that fit the bill. I always end up buying either lightly used, or NOS frames from 2-6 years ago or so. Anyone else here find new racquets to be overkill and just not a good investment? I mean regardless of income, dropping $200+ on the latest release because it has that crazy new, must have Nanometric Gel, or GrapheneXT or whatever is a bit ridiculous lol. It is all a bunch of marketing hype, and people fall for it by the thousands. Not to say that the tech is bad, but its not much different or better than whats already out there.

I am much more content to spend half that and get equally as good of a racquet from a few years ago and never look back. My most recent acquisitions are a Donnay Pro One 18x20 and a Prince Tour Pro 98. They're both fantastic sticks, and I got both of them NEW for the price of one 2018 racquet on the shelf. You can't go wrong there :)
You do realise that in another 2-6 years the racquets your buying cheaper WILL be these current ones with fancy nanometric graphene gel etc?!

Hopefully there will always be SOMEONE making a decent racquet that we can buy cheaper a few years later.... the one good thing about constant racquet upgrades is that they get cheaper quicker too once they get superceded.
 

li0scc0

Hall of Fame
#20
I've really taken to the 10-11 year old Head Microgel Radical pro. That said, I extend the length to 27.5 and change pallets out to the Wilson shaped TK82S.
It's not the latest and greatest by any means, as it is 11 years old. I suppose it's "technologically advanced" compared to a racquet from the 90s. I haven't found anything current that compares.
I really enjoyed hitting with an old 80s Kneissl Aero 30 club. It was buttery soft and with a perfect feel and balance. Roughly 95 square inches. Fantastic racquet. I didn't stay with it because of grommet availability .. Or lack thereof.
 
#21
Every tennis manufacturer want you to think they make better racquets every now and them but they are made in China.

I once bought a pro staff 85, made in China and sold it to someone. I bought a st Vincent one and I immediately could tell it has a wonderful feeling and heavier.
 
#23
You do realise that in another 2-6 years the racquets your buying cheaper WILL be these current ones with fancy nanometric graphene gel etc?!

Hopefully there will always be SOMEONE making a decent racquet that we can buy cheaper a few years later.... the one good thing about constant racquet upgrades is that they get cheaper quicker too once they get superceded.

What exactly do you mean by that? Are you saying manufacturers are using the exact same sticks, adding bologna "technology" to them and giving them a new paint job to sell as an entirely different racquet at a later date?
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#24
Every time my game develops or my tastes change, I find myself discovering slightly older model racquets with specs that fit the bill. I always end up buying either lightly used, or NOS frames from 2-6 years ago or so. Anyone else here find new racquets to be overkill and just not a good investment? I mean regardless of income, dropping $200+ on the latest release because it has that crazy new, must have Nanometric Gel, or GrapheneXT or whatever is a bit ridiculous lol. It is all a bunch of marketing hype, and people fall for it by the thousands. Not to say that the tech is bad, but its not much different or better than whats already out there.

I am much more content to spend half that and get equally as good of a racquet from a few years ago and never look back. My most recent acquisitions are a Donnay Pro One 18x20 and a Prince Tour Pro 98. They're both fantastic sticks, and I got both of them NEW for the price of one 2018 racquet on the shelf. You can't go wrong there :)
Take this jibber jabber to the Classics section and leave us to Ooh and Ahh over our new Vibranium racquets and their magical powers! You’ll eventually see the light even if it takes you 3-10 years and you buy it second hand.
 
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