Anyone get the impression celebrations in the past were more "muted"?

RF-18

Talk Tennis Guru
Than today?

If so, why is that?

Compared to today how players fall to floor, crying, and what not. In the past it was alot more muted is the general feeling.
 

tennisaddict

Bionic Poster
Tennis was gentlemanly when the elite countries of the world played. The spread of the sport has its positives but it has to suffer the negative consequences.
 
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Roddick85

Hall of Fame
I would simply say it's a generation thing, different times, upbringing and ways to deal with emotions.
 
D

Deleted member 766172

Guest
It’s all about witnessing someone you respect doing a something and then doing it yourself. That’s how it got started. I wonder who the first to fall flat on there back after winning the last point of a slam was.


Kind of related:
Notice how after Fed admitted that he thought he was going to lose in the Millman match and started thinking about press conference where he would have to explain himself, others started saying the same thing? I noticed a Zverev and Kyrgios both say something very similar.
 

BeatlesFan

Bionic Poster
Than today?

If so, why is that?

Compared to today how players fall to floor, crying, and what not. In the past it was alot more muted is the general feeling.
Social media, selfies-- the whole phone culture. When Borg won Wimbledon in 1980, there was none of that. You might see a 12 second highlight reel on the news and the next day's newspaper would have an article about it in the sports section. There was no need to have over-the-top celebrations because few saw it, and when they did, it was a black and white and grainy newspaper image.
 

HuusHould

Professional
Djokovic ripped his shirt off after 6 hours of the greatest match ever played. That was a thoroughly earned emotional release.
May be, but he wasn't the first to rip his shirt off, it was done many years earlier by Andrew Illie (normally after progressing to the 2nd or 3rd round of the AO) and Pat Rafter (I think after Davis Cup victories).
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
Than today?

If so, why is that?

Compared to today how players fall to floor, crying, and what not. In the past it was alot more muted is the general feeling.
It definitely was far less melodramatic. Players used to just walk to the net and shake hands.
 

vanioMan

Legend
I don't mind over the top celebrations. You've worked extremely hard and sacrificed a lot to finally win a slams/several slams or become world #1. There's nothing wrong or bad celebrating your achievements and enjoying yourself.
 
I don't mind over the top celebrations. You've worked extremely hard and sacrificed a lot to finally win a slams/several slams or become world #1. There's nothing wrong or bad celebrating your achievements and enjoying yourself.
That doesn't mean celebrating every the least bit significant point won with a fistpump or something.
 

NatF

Bionic Poster
And this is the coolest celebration ever:


Think it was atleast in part just having empathy for Hewitt for losing in front of the home crowd. Safin is one cool dude.
First one I thought of.

Would have loved to see Lleyton's celebration if he pulled that out :(
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
I remember that great moment.
In fact I think it was Borg who was the first to break with the stroll/gentle run to the net to shake hands tradition by falling to his knees whenever he won a Wimbledon title. He unleashed a monster! :cool:
 

BorgCash

Legend
In fact I think it was Borg who was the first to break with the stroll/gentle run to the net to shake hands tradition by falling to his knees whenever he won a Wimbledon title. He unleashed a monster! :cool:
Actually i don't remember he was doing it five times in a row during five years period. This picture was taken in 1980 after the toughest final for him.
Even if it was so, it's ok, because he was an 'Iceman' during all his matches long.
 
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Deleted member 22147

Guest
There are certainly more players making a conscious attempt at looking cool. That is for sure. The handshakes also are more "cool".

I miss the old Sampras Rusedski type handshakes. Very businesslike. More elaborate handshakes should be kept for extra-special occasions. They have lost their charm, by being normalised and even expected.
 

HipRotation

Hall of Fame
Maybe muted but I would say they were still a lot of showboating going on, the most common Wimbledon celebration back in the day was to jump the net for the handshake. It's as if to say "look how much energy I still got, you didn't tire me at all"

 
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