are tennis trainers better to use than running trainers

finalfantasy7

Semi-Pro
as the title suggests, is their any difference between running trainers and tennis trainers.
Ive never used tennis trainers, but i wear asics kayano 16 because there so comfortable.
As my feet sloap inwards all the time - these asics stop that and have thick soles
 

WildVolley

Legend
For tennis? Tennis trainers are usually made to have more lateral stability and a more durable outsole and toe than running shoes. This usually makes them heavier than a running shoe.

If you play enough tennis, you'll probably save money by buying tennis shoes rather than jogging shoes. Some people are more likely to roll an ankle playing tennis in running shoes than tennis shoes. That's another reason to consider tennis shoes for tennis.
 

whomad15

Semi-Pro
Invest in a pair of actual court shoes. If you don't play a lot, they'll take forever to wear out. If you do play a lot, I guarantee you'd have gone through at least 4 pairs of regular non-court shoes in that time period.

As wildvolley said. Tennis court shoes have more ankle support, and more durable everything. They do weigh more because of this though.
 

Bobby Jr

G.O.A.T.
It's simple: If you want to roll your ankle wear running shoes to play tennis.

It might not get you on day one... or even day 50. But it will - and you will regret not getting shoes with a lower profile and infinitely better lateral support.

Regardless of ankle injuries, playing in poor support shoes can also cause or aggravate knee problems.
 

finalfantasy7

Semi-Pro
ok, by the way u lot have described tennis trainers, the running trainers do the same (assumption on just reading) these trainers are very solid especially around the ankle, they have a nice thin material on top which allows air in, they are also very light which i love,

Thanks, for the info though
 

Bobby Jr

G.O.A.T.
ok, by the way u lot have described tennis trainers, the running trainers do the same (assumption on just reading) these trainers are very solid especially around the ankle, they have a nice thin material on top which allows air in, they are also very light which i love,
Huh?

Shoes generally go like this in order of cushioning (highest to lowest):

Running shoes - cross-trainers - tennis shoes.

And in this order in terms of support:

Tennis shoes - cross-trainers - running shoes.

So, if you care about rolling your ankle you will never wear running shoes for anything other than running where the vast majority of movement is linear, not side-to-side.

Some cross-trainers may be OK to play tennis in although, even then, in recent years cross-trainers have moved closer to the running end of the scale because of the pursuit of being ultra light - something the consumer apparently wants. Cross-trainers will also wear out much quicker than tennis shoes because they're unlikely to have wear guards in the right places.

On cushioning: basically, the more cushioning you have, the hard it is to make a shoe truly stable. Some succeed at it but there is always a trade-off in durability or price etc...

Tennis shoes work best if you consider comfort and support first and then worry cushioning and weight. I'd much rather my feet hurt a little from the court pounding than roll an ankle trying to avoid it.
 
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