Are you a "come-on" junkie...?

Trickster

Rookie
I have noted that even some of the previously calmer pros are throwing in big come ons these days. I remember Federer was relatively less animated in matches than he is now.

Anyway it seems like this has become a main stay in modern tennis and is even being encouraged by coaches on nearly every point won, but why?

I recently read "The Best Tennis of Your Life: 50 Mental Strategies" and really started looking at my tennis differently and channelling my mental presence and energy. Some of the greats in tennis the Woodies, Pete Sampras, Borg, were masters in what I'm trying to achieve.

Why has there been such a shift in tennis psychology? Or is just something players are advised to do for the modern audience/show biz aspect of the game.

Thanks
T
 

blablavla

Legend
I have noted that even some of the previously calmer pros are throwing in big come ons these days. I remember Federer was relatively less animated in matches than he is now.

Anyway it seems like this has become a main stay in modern tennis and is even being encouraged by coaches on nearly every point won, but why?

I recently read "The Best Tennis of Your Life: 50 Mental Strategies" and really started looking at my tennis differently and channelling my mental presence and energy. Some of the greats in tennis the Woodies, Pete Sampras, Borg, were masters in what I'm trying to achieve.

Why has there been such a shift in tennis psychology? Or is just something players are advised to do for the modern audience/show biz aspect of the game.

Thanks
T
generally no, though a fist up after a nice point won - yes.

on the "come-on" in particular, only as part of mind games, when my opponent starts abusing "come-on" then I might do the same, just to show that I can as well celebrate in a way that might disturb the other player.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
Junkie is a strong word, but if I hit a pretty spectacular winner in a match(forehand cross court or down the line winner on the run). Oh yeah I’m celebrating with a “Come On” and a fist pump.
 
So many things are copycat. There weren’t even towels except for at changeovers, now everyone needs it between every point. And since when do you have to look over three balls to serve two? I can promise that some rejected ball suddenly seems to be the perfect first serve ball the next point. One person starts something and then everyone is doing it.
 

SinneGOAT

Professional
I don’t say anything, I may do a very small fist but I don’t like being loud and obnoxious on court. I don’t even grunt, it was how I was raised to play. I also don’t like when others do it, because then it’s more about playing your opponent than the game.
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
I don’t see too many fist pumps, ‘C’mons’ or overt displays of positive aggressive energy in rec tennis amongst adults - more common to see that amongst kids. On the other hand, you see many more overt displays of negative energy where people get angry at their poor play and yell at themselves or hit balls hard into the fence or net after an error - a few even throw racquets. Guys who get angry a lot don’t get too many invitations to social tennis matches though.
 
Much more likely in doubles when we are celebrating a good point; not very often in singles. My fans [if I happen to have any] are more likely to cheer than me.

There are many things that have changed along with the equipment: towelling off after every point, taking 3 or more balls before serving [Sampras used to take only 1], etc.
 
So many things are copycat. There weren’t even towels except for at changeovers, now everyone needs it between every point. And since when do you have to look over three balls to serve two? I can promise that some rejected ball suddenly seems to be the perfect first serve ball the next point. One person starts something and then everyone is doing it.
You took the words right out of my keyboard.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
Watching Jabeur v. Collins.

Martina Navratilova commentating, "Yelling COME ON after an opponent's mistake is a no-no."

Collins wins the game on a Jabeur forehand about 8 feet long. "COME OOONNN!!"

:-D
 
Watching Jabeur v. Collins.

Martina Navratilova commentating, "Yelling COME ON after an opponent's mistake is a no-no."

Collins wins the game on a Jabeur forehand about 8 feet long. "COME OOONNN!!"

:-D
I think people these days are doing it to pump themselves up, not necessarily try to put their opponent down.

But yeah, I learned in a similar school of thought as Navratilova.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
Oh, for sure, she was trying to pump herself up. I thought Jabeur missed a few opportunities to yell COME ON herself, like after Collins double-faulted or after Jabeur won a point with a fake smash drop shot. But I guess she's classier than I think I would've been.
 
Oh, for sure, she was trying to pump herself up. I thought Jabeur missed a few opportunities to yell COME ON herself, like after Collins double-faulted or after Jabeur won a point with a fake smash drop shot. But I guess she's classier than I think I would've been.
I've seen her name before and just assumed she was Dutch. I like her game, especially her versatility.

I like the fact that there is so much more variety in the women's game and not just the Big 3.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
I've seen her name before and just assumed she was Dutch. I like her game, especially her versatility.

I like the fact that there is so much more variety in the women's game and not just the Big 3.
I completely agree. One of the main reasons I watch more WTA than ATP. I like NOT knowing or assuming who will win.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I think people these days are doing it to pump themselves up, not necessarily try to put their opponent down.

But yeah, I learned in a similar school of thought as Navratilova.
My perception of it is the other way 'round. I'm also from that school of thought and as soon as I hear the volume ramp up, that's nothing but obnoxious in my book.

I'm a high school coach and whenever I see matches among the stronger kids where they start to get loud, they're plainly flirting with taunting. When Serena and Danielle Collins do it on TV and the talking heads are merely amused with it, I cringe a little bit... and switch it off.

Good for Martina to call it what it is when it happens (y) Love her forever
 

Clash Ah ah

Rookie
An ill advised “come on” can wake the other person up. They’re were happy getting beat, going through the motions and you’ve just startled them in playing for every point.
 

Jack the Hack

Hall of Fame
One of the things I like about Jannik Sinner is that he's pretty calm whether he wins or loses a point. He does a little fist pump and moves on. No crazy screams, grunts, or racquet smashes. Very similar to the Swedish champions like Borg and Edberg (though I do remember Stefan and Mats doing the "vischt" thing after winning big points).
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
An ill advised “come on” can wake the other person up. They’re were happy getting beat, going through the motions and you’ve just startled them in playing for every point.
I agree that in rec tennis, it can be counterproductive as ‘trash-talking’ and fist pumps can make opponents fight harder as suddenly they are more motivated to not lose against someone who is perceived as behaving like a jerk. If I am slightly angry about what my opponent is doing, I play better. If I get very angry about something (usually repeated bad line-calling) though, it is counter-productive - I’ve become better about not having that happen anymore.

I think there is an etiquette to rec tennis to not show that you are taking it too seriously even if you are a very competitive person as you are usually playing against friends or club-mates. It just makes everyone feel like “what’s the big deal“ if it is a friendly social match. I guess you could show more emotion if it were a tournament or USTA league match and people would think that is OK.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
Dr Allen Fox in his sports psych book says to maintain an even keel and don't get too excited if you play a great point or make an error. He says it is good to use "come on" or other physical or verbal acts to get psyched up too though but sparingly. Please don't go overboard or you'll become "that" guy or gal. We had a guy in our area who would yell "YES" like Jimmy Connors in a USO night match after way too many points. He was loud and literally would scream it frequently after several points in a row. Everyone hated playing him.
 
Dr Allen Fox in his sports psych book says to maintain an even keel and don't get too excited if you play a great point or make an error. He says it is good to use "come on" or other physical or verbal acts to get psyched up too though but sparingly. Please don't go overboard or you'll become "that" guy or gal. We had a guy in our area who would yell "YES" like Jimmy Connors in a USO night match after way too many points. He was loud and literally would scream it frequently after several points in a row. Everyone hated playing him.
I’ve never played him and hate him.
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
What I’ve also found is that if I get too pumped up emotionally after winning a big point or important game during a match, invariably there is a emotional low or trough that happens after a few minutes that might cost the next few points or games.

I don’t recommend going up and down in intensity during a match - it is better to keep an even keel. You can celebrate after you win the match.
 

Wurm

Semi-Pro
I understand it when playing in a properly competitive setting where there's a pretty high level of tennis going on and a lot of stress involved that leaks out in funny ways. Playing in a casual setting it comes across as a total "PAY ATTENTION TO MEEEEEEE" move, as far as I'm concerned. I was down at the local club practising serves not that long ago when one dobber playing a few courts along kept doing it... I would have minded less if the tennis they were playing wasn't sh*t.

I get grumpy with myself if I'm playing badly or completely duff a straight forward shot but I seldom get above speaking voice volume that my opponent probably can't even hear (my voice doesn't carry very well unless I pitch it up at least a half octave). It's simply not in my nature to get pumped up at merely hitting the shot I was intending, however good someone else might think it was.

Martina Navratilova commentating, "Yelling COME ON after an opponent's mistake is a no-no."

Collins wins the game on a Jabeur forehand about 8 feet long. "COME OOONNN!!"
Heh. But I think it's ok if the "come on" is when the game/set has just been won as opposed to a random point.
 
You can celebrate after you win the match.
Even though I only have two frames and just the shoes I wear to play already on my feet, I bought a huge tennis bag. In it I keep a trophy, a small fold up table, a telescoping mic stand and a mic. After I win a match, I give a speech and then grab the trophy and cruise around the perimeter of the court while kissing it. One of those giant checks for $3mil just doesn’t fit (sigh). I’ve gottten a couple eye rolls, but it seems to go over pretty well.
 
Even though I only have two frames and just the shoes I wear to play already on my feet, I bought a huge tennis bag. In it I keep a trophy, a small fold up table, a telescoping mic stand and a mic. After I win a match, I give a speech and then grab the trophy and cruise around the perimeter of the court while kissing it. One of those giant checks for $3mil just doesn’t fit (sigh). I’ve gottten a couple eye rolls, but it seems to go over pretty well.
I thought the confetti machine and fireworks were a bit over the top, though.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
Why has there been such a shift in tennis psychology?
Most past pros and greats talk about positive reinforcement, outlet for energy to manage stress, and more. I think most talked internally, but there is research and studies that talk about vocalizing helps, so probably something along that line. Also sports psychology talk about intimidation factors of opponents using verbalization.
 
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