Are you happy with your tennis level?

Are you happy with your tennis level?


  • Total voters
    32
#3
No. I have been stuck at 3.0 for over 5 years. Its not a fun level to be at. Going out and rallying for fun is still annoying since 2 shot/1 shot error is the norm on some days. Youtube would call me a failure if I posted a vid of me playing. The worst part for me is I don't see how I'll ever get out of it. Its not playing time, when I started playing more times a week I actually got slightly worse and regressed, even if I put hundreds of more hours in I'll still be stuck at this level.

All I care about is getting good enough to the point where can I have a nice rally with someone with 5+ quality shots as the norm. I don't care about competitive play.
 
#4
For me, my level changes dramatically from indoors to outdoors. At my club I always play outside (indoor cost every use), and outside I play well, but when I play matches (always indoor) I play much better. I don't know if it's the low bounce or what, but I literally am more consistent and hit the ball much harder, smoother, have more control, and play much better defense.

I would be fine with this if it wasn't for the fact I play once a week indoors and 3 times outdoors. I wish I knew why there is such a difference.
 

Chadalina

Hall of Fame
#5
Very happy, ive only been playing once a week and still hit at least 50 in a row everytime. Im going to start playing more, was injured on and off for a while now.

Working on first serve now, my toss has gotten erratic, sails overhead and left, its hurting my shoulder. Think im leaning a bit upon the release of the toss. Had similar problem as junior with cupping the ball when tossing (has same effect), will be easy to fix. When i do it right, its very fast, when i do it wrong it hurts :)
 
#6
My answer would actually be No, and I care, but at the same time I don’t care to make the needed efforts to improve it, meaning that I am settled with mediocrity.
Bottom line, I don’t care.
 
Last edited:

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#7
Maybe the question should be:
have you achieved the Drop Volley(TM) ?

Because if you have, you are happy with your level, otherwise you are yearning and feeling empty and worthless.
 
#9
Coming back to the poll, my tennis life had all three stages, in progressive occurrence.
In percentage of time for each stage, we have:
Yes, 5%
No, and care, 20%
No, and don’t care, 75%
 

TagUrIt

Professional
#18
I’m strong 4.0 player, but there is ALWAYS room for improvement and growth. I will most likely always be a student of this game. If you love this game, we should all strive better to tennis players.
 

Chadalina

Hall of Fame
#24
Are we talking Top Spin or Mario Tennis? Gameboy tennis?

Destroy in all 3. Like to see one of you beat INTENSE Mario playing as Daisy... yeah.
Video game tennis is like the best visualization there is because your actually doing it. Watching tennis makes you bad though, walk on the court and think your a backboard like djok/nadal, returning every shot. Then remember you actually have to do stuff :) and head back to the tv/ttw
 
#25
Hell no I'm a legit scrub. I only play once every 10 years for an hour or 2. But I'll take y'all in basketball. So I'm not some basement dwelling loser lol
 
#27
No, not at all. I'm 3.5 at best by now...

First serve and forehand are still in great form but my second serve is stinking and I've got minimum net skills. I don't have confidence to hit a proper backhand on matches for a long time, only against lesser players, my slice is still very decent but backhand is so easily exploitable nowadays...

Im going even further and opening up a bit of my personal life here: I'm fighting (real) injuries since 2011 with a series of bizarre events. I've screwed up the entire right side of my body, half of them because of Tennis.

Actually almost exactly 8 years ago - July 1st of 2011 a 40kgmarble table fell right on my right foot, that's almost 100 pounds for you Americans. And I momentously lost movement for my right thumb. I had to do a surgery, but it wasn't in the same day as ironically I wasn't even feeling pain. I even came back home driving that day. Doctor could't do anything promptly because of that, so I lost 2 weeks before the surgery and another 3 months to be able to properly walk again and then another month of physio. I got lazy, gained 25kgs (roughly 60 pounds) during that time.

Fought back, lost the 30kg and started working on my game, reached a solid 4.0 with glimpses of 4.5 just by the end of 2013 and the middle of 2014. I was even thinking about properly competing again until I've had a torn meniscus on my right knee. And here goes another surgery. What happened later? Well, I got lazy again. And it was almost downhill from there.

I was trying to get back on shape by 2015, started 2016 on a better note but then sprained my right ankle and ended up developing tendinitis there. To further increase that drama, I've been diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome on my right hand - consequences of tennis elbow, damn you PS90, so I quit and dumped everything. I couldn't even watch my racket anymore, ended up with 131kg by February of last year until I said again "you know what, **** that, I'm getting back to where I should be".

Lost 48kg in 8 months (mar 18-nov18), got back on court and my game was evolving again... until march of this year when I had a slight rotator cuff tear. I'm not laying in the surgery table for it until the end of this year, but I'm scared of becoming lazy again during the recovery.
 
#32
Rec players should not be unhappy with their tennis level as it's rather meaningless in the whole scheme of things.
Are you a true rec player? Ive seen some vids of you playing and your very good, 4.5 maybe?

I think for a rec player 4.0 denotes expert level or mastery of tennis(like black belt in a serious martial art). Anything above that is unusual. Anyone can get to 2.5 but then most people platue at 2.5 to 3.5 and stay there forever. I'd be happy with 3.5 and 4.0 is the ultimate goal (mainly for fun rallies, cant do that at my level).
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
#33
Are you a true rec player? Ive seen some vids of you playing and your very good, 4.5 maybe?

I think for a rec player 4.0 denotes expert level or mastery of tennis(like black belt in a serious martial art). Anything above that is unusual. Anyone can get to 2.5 but then most people platue at 2.5 to 3.5 and stay there forever. I'd be happy with 3.5 and 4.0 is the ultimate goal (mainly for fun rallies, cant do that at my level).
Yeah, I'm a rec player along with 99% of the rest of the folks who screw around with tennis. In my view, middling 5.0 and above is, for all intents and purposes, open level play. Everything below that is rec tennis. Unless you're an open level player or are earning a living as a tennis coach (as opposed to merely "instructor" - most instructors probably play tennis at the rec level, albeit at the higher end of it), you're a rec player. Which makes it a hobby. Which makes it unworthy of being overly concerned with one's level. Just my view, of course.
 
#34
I’m happy with my current level, mostly. I don’t have any kind of real serve though, and I couldn’t do a purposeful drop shot if I tried. Those two things bother me. I’ve actually improved quite a bit this year and playing is so much more fun! I believe changing my grip accounts for the improvement. However, the heat, really just the humidity, is doing me in right now. I play just for fun with my husband.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#40
Not quite since I can beat 4.5 players. But good try.

EDIT: I may not be giving myself enough credit on the consistency stat. It's more of a high 3.5 and mental would be closer to 3.5 as well.
Yeah I know what you meant. 2.5 consistency and other 5.0s don't mix. 3.5 seems more reasonable.
 
#43
I think for a rec player 4.0 denotes expert level or mastery of tennis(like black belt in a serious martial art).
It is all relative. Anyone who has been fortunate enough to play tennis regularly with correct instruction from a young age will play '4.0 tennis' fairly easily as an adult - even after going years without picking up a racquet. If those players are young and fit, and have the time to dedicate to regular practice, it is not overly difficult for them to reach a 5.0-type level (staying there requires a bit of commitment though).

Going higher is where the sport starts to demand significant levels of talent and sacrifice, and you usually need a financial justification for doing so. That's when I stop describing the players as recreational.
 
#44
It is all relative. Anyone who has been fortunate enough to play tennis regularly with correct instruction from a young age will play '4.0 tennis' fairly easily as an adult - even after going years without picking up a racquet. If those players are young and fit, and have the time to dedicate to regular practice, it is not overly difficult for them to reach a 5.0-type level (staying there requires a bit of commitment though).

Going higher is where the sport starts to demand significant levels of talent and sacrifice, and you usually need a financial justification for doing so. That's when I stop describing the players as recreational.
Oh sure. If you start young and receive quality training from a young age, 5.0 would be achievable for almost anyone who is physically fit (assuming you started well before 10). The only thing is I don't consider that a true rec player journey since I think almost everyone who is putting a child as young as that through intense training at least is considering competitive play in the child's future. I consider a true rec player as someone who never had quality one on one training or someone who picked up the game only in their teens or as adults.

Through the way I define rec player I would say 5.0 is unattainable unless you put in a ridiculous amount of time and resources into it. So just to compare it to another discipline a legit bjj black belt is often a fairly talented person who started as an adult who has been training regularly for 10 years. I would correspond that to mastery of your craft and a 4.0 level in tennis. 5.0s who started tennis as adults are very unusual and rare .
 
#45
Oh sure. If you start young and receive quality training from a young age, 5.0 would be achievable for almost anyone who is physically fit (assuming you started well before 10). The only thing is I don't consider that a true rec player journey since I think almost everyone who is putting a child as young as that through intense training at least is considering competitive play in the child's future. I consider a true rec player as someone who never had quality one on one training or someone who picked up the game only in their teens or as adults.
I'm not really talking about intense training - just regular clinics and maybe weekend matchplay in summer. Similar to what you'd see in kids playing other sports casually (e.g. soccer practice midweek and a game on weekends).

Getting kids early makes a huge difference. My parents were always very strict about us playing weekly sports (one winter and one summer) all through our school years, and it's given me a level of ability that far outstrips my poor natural athleticism.
 
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