As a RH, how do I slice wide right serving on the ad side?

antony

Professional
Slice wide left is one of my favorite shots serving from deuce side. Should I just rotate my grip to whatever is left of continental?
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Slice wide left is one of my favorite shots serving from deuce side. Should I just rotate my grip to whatever is left of continental?
I would suggest practicing hitting with an attack angle that is more over the top, by tossing more to your left.

The more over-the-top the clock angle across the back of the ball (closer to 7-1 instead of 8-2 clock angle), the more the spin will grab the ground and give the ball a tendency to kick to the right. The added topspin will also allow you to hit a target on the ground further up the sideline closer to the net, so that the bounce is further into the alley.
 

BlueB

Legend
Search up twist serve. It's not quite a slice trajectory, but it would bounce to the right.

Alternatively, toss slightly to the right, and hyper rotate the arm at long axis, both by ISR and pronation. This should allow you to hit the ball on the left half and produce the "lefty" spin.
Don't try it if your joints are not fairly flexible.
 

Injured Again

Hall of Fame
Let me make sure I understand. You can already serve out wide in the deuce court and are wondering how to do so in the ad court?

If so, I found what works best for me as an older age grouper, is to hit more pure sidespin serving to the ad court, because getting the ball to dip is secondary to getting the ball to move to my left. That's because the net is lower in the center and it matters less how short you land the serve in the service box. My major reason for hitting this serve is to get my opponent moving to his right so I can go back behind him into his backhand if he is a righty, or to secondarily keep him honest from protecting his backhand return.

I serve it the same way I serve wide in the deuce court, except I try to alter my toss a couple of inches to my right and a couple of inches forward. Of course, my toss is not consistent to within probably six to eight inches but that change in toss is the mindset I take into the serve.
 

ZanderGoga

Semi-Pro
Don't. Every type of ball that moves or kicks out to the right side of the ad box, from a right handed server's perspective, is either too advanced or biomechanically dangerous.

Yes, a good kick serve will do wonders over on that side. But those only exist from the 5.5 level up. Below that, they're objectively worse than just rolling in a slice, and they're usually worse by a large margin. Club and rec kick serves are just invitations to pummel the ball. A very large number of 7.0's have come to the same conclusion, and don't even bother with a kick serve in their arsenal. And essentially none of them have a "reverse slice," precisely because it's extremely low percentage, and physically dangerous, all for very little reward.

Focus on making sure the ball has movement and at least some pace on it. Forget about gimmickry.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
My last tournament a couple of months ago, I had to rely heavily on that serve, because I was overmatched from the baseline against an opponent with a good clay forehand. It's a good serve to have on clay.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
More cowbell. More topspin. For that AD serve out wide, you should be adding a generous helping of topspin to a top-slice serve. (Do not attempt this wide serve with a low-clearance slice).

Eventually, with a top-slice serve, you can try to develop it into a twist implementation of a kick serve. A vanilla kick serve could work but, to get a decent twist action on the bounce, you need a VERY fast brush for your topslice serve.
 
Don't. Every type of ball that moves or kicks out to the right side of the ad box, from a right handed server's perspective, is either too advanced or biomechanically dangerous.

Yes, a good kick serve will do wonders over on that side. But those only exist from the 5.5 level up. Below that, they're objectively worse than just rolling in a slice, and they're usually worse by a large margin. Club and rec kick serves are just invitations to pummel the ball. A very large number of 7.0's have come to the same conclusion, and don't even bother with a kick serve in their arsenal. And essentially none of them have a "reverse slice," precisely because it's extremely low percentage, and physically dangerous, all for very little reward.

Focus on making sure the ball has movement and at least some pace on it. Forget about gimmickry.
There are a lot of good kick serves below the 5.5 level.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
There are a lot of good kick serves below the 5.5 level.
Yeah ... I let statement go. I found it surprising since I s&v successfully in 4.5 singles behind kick serve. Here is another key data point for 4.5 kick serves in 4.5 tournaments ... they are being returned by 4.5s, not pros.

Post your old flip fh video for @AnyPUG ... brother seeking fh flip enlightenment.
 
Last edited:

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Slice wide left is one of my favorite shots serving from deuce side. Should I just rotate my grip to whatever is left of continental?
Don't do it ... our #2 high school single player (right handed) hit every serve and every overhead with left to right spin. He brushed the racquet across the ball right to left ... hideous ... can't unsee it even all these years later. We called it weasle spin.

He came in behind his serve (s&v) so if opponent hit a lob on ros you could see a double weasle. :eek:
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Is this the serve you're hoping to learn?

My high school teammate wished his looked like that. 8-B Two ways to hit a slice serve 1) pronate 2) carve around. Rosol just pronated through left side of ball ... nearest I could tell with my tablet. My teammate hit the reverse carve around kind ... very little pace ... did I mention hideous?
 

chetrbox

Rookie
I'm almost willing to bet that I've also seen either Bublik or Fritz hit such a 'reverse' serve, but I'm not able to find any evidence right now. OP, if this is the serve you insist on learning, here's a video that might be useful to you:
 
Last edited:

antony

Professional
Is this the serve you're hoping to learn?

Excellent example


I'm almost willing to bet that I've also seen either Bublik or Fritz hit such a 'reverse' serve, but I'm not able to find any evidence right now. OP, if this is the serve you insist on learning, here's a video that might be useful to you:
ya!! this is what I'm going to start practicing for fun. Maybe even go for more extreme sidespin on a shorter ball. Thanks everyone
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Let me make sure I understand. You can already serve out wide in the deuce court and are wondering how to do so in the ad court?
My major reason for hitting this serve is to get my opponent moving to his right so I can go back behind him into his backhand if he is a righty
???

Court geometry makes it very difficult for a righty server to slice down the AD side T and make it curve away to the returner's right (towards the middle of the court).

 
Last edited:

Injured Again

Hall of Fame
???

Court geometry makes it very difficult for a righty server to slice down the AD side T and make it curve away to the returner's right (towards the middle of the court).

I'm struggling with shoulder impingement and I stand about six feet left of the center hash mark, but I can get a still get a slice serve to be on the deuce court side as it crosses the baseline if I can land it within a few inches of the center. I'm not unique in this - probably a third of the guys I play with can do it.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
I'm struggling with shoulder impingement and I stand about six feet left of the center hash mark, but I can get a still get a slice serve to be on the deuce court side as it crosses the baseline if I can land it within a few inches of the center. I'm not unique in this - probably a third of the guys I play with can do it.
Nikola is a pro and he cannot get his slice curve from the AD to curve into the Deuce...
Rec players should be happy if they can make the returner move to the right, but curving it into the Deuce is very difficult and not even necessary.

 
Last edited:

Dragy

Legend
As simple and unsophisticated as it may sound, I like Jeff’s advice from this video (go straight to 1:15), at least for ad court. Want to pull opponent off the court? Hit wide by starting wide.

If your opponent manages to reliably attack it DTL exposing your position, with his BH - well, he’s good. Drop the strategy.
 

antony

Professional
Thank you everyone!! I haven't really tried to practice this shot because I only have been playing or taking lessons, not really going out to practice high percentage-of-being-embarrassing serves on my own yet (I will when the ball machine arrives!!), but I was telling one of my coaches today about this shot today and try to explain the idea to him, and I decide to try a few of them and I was able to do eventually do it!!!!. After a total shank, the attempts got closer and closer to the service box until I hit one right on the doubles line wide right! He tried it too and did it, but it was totally new to him too. I was able to do a few more before he made me hit some number of normal serves in a row which I comfortably did. But now I know this shot is possible (for me)!!!!
 

antony

Professional
Nikola is a pro and he cannot get his slice curve from the AD to curve into the Deuce...
Rec players should be happy if they can make the returner move to the right, but curving it into the Deuce is very difficult and not even necessary.

No, I am trying to make the returner move to his left (my right) when serving from ad side with the shot I described. I have been doing this by hitting more on the left side of the ball
 

JW89

New User
Too many recreational players focus on unnecessarily complicated techniques like this instead of having an even basic understanding of the fundamentals.

I would bet you cannot consistently place any ball with pace in the box, regardless of type of serve. Would love to see a video of you proving my wrong.

I will assume I’m not going to see a video and offer this advice: work more on the basics.
 
Top