ATP/WTA players and eating banana during the change over

#1
I see professional players do this all the times during the change over or during the break between sets. I get why they take a few bites of banana to give themselves an energy boost.

Why not just take the banana and a few strawberries + plus water to turn it into liquid smoothies. In liquid form, it will digest much quicker and those carb/sugar will flow quickly into the blood stream thus giving the athlete a faster boost of energy, than actually chewing the banana. I didn't see too many tennis players do it, or maybe they do and I am just not seeing it.

Thoughts?
 
#11
My guess is liquid form will spike the insulin, whereas in solid form it'll be more gradual. But those freezee looking packets they suck on are concentrated electrolytes, so I'm sure they're getting what they need for the match.
That’s what I thought as well about bananas in liquid form. Is it also a good idea to add orange pith with banana in the smoothies?
 
#12
Why not have a professional chef available on the court :giggle:. If you your name is Djokovic, Federer of Nadal than you should also have available a pro banana peeler too. Well, you can't really bother a chef with peeling bananas, no?
 
#13
A large buffet table along with an open bar should be set up on some ATP courts, and most WTA courts during tournaments exclusively for the fans. At least then the fans would feel they were getting something for the price of their ticket.
 
#14
A large buffet table along with an open bar should be set up on some ATP courts, and most WTA courts during tournaments exclusively for the fans. At least then the fans would feel they were getting something for the price of their ticket.
LOL... what would you expect from the buffet table given that the ticket price is $25 for general session?
 

TagUrIt

Professional
#15
Bananas are a great source of potassium and energy for endurance type activities. The benefits of this fruit are better consumed, digested and absorbed slowly. Putting them in a smoothie isn’t a bad idea (people do it all the time) just not appropriate for this.
 

Virginia

Hall of Fame
#16
The thing is they only take one bite of the banana - that's not enough to achieve anything. I've always thought how pathetic it looks. Plus what the hell is in those coloured drinks - too much sugar is my guess. The whole business of the changeover routine is over rated.
 

TagUrIt

Professional
#17
The thing is they only take one bite of the banana - that's not enough to achieve anything. I've always thought how pathetic it looks. Plus what the hell is in those coloured drinks - too much sugar is my guess. The whole business of the changeover routine is over rated.

It may not seem like it’s doing much, but it’s just enough food to keep the athletes sustained during a match. The colored drinks are most likely water with electrolyte tablets in them.

Another thing you may notice is most tennis players sip their drinks. It’s a better way to absorb liquids. It may seem silly to us, but there’s a reason behind why they do what they do in the courts for nutrition and staying hydrated.
 
#18
The thing is they only take one bite of the banana - that's not enough to achieve anything. I've always thought how pathetic it looks. Plus what the hell is in those coloured drinks - too much sugar is my guess. The whole business of the changeover routine is over rated.
Too much sugar? Are you telling me that Djokovic and Rafa are getting fat? :eek::laughing:.
Seriously, I was wondering what's in those 'pinkish drinks' too ... Um, there is grape that is naturally pink, pineapple too ... not sure if they were 'engineered' or not. The rest of fruits is more red than realy pink.
 
#20
Honey is the ultimate energy boost, high in protein (specially, if the source was wild trees), the lightest food on stomach, it benefits on human body is almost unlimited, specially when dissolved in water, yet, you don't see them having it!!!!
 
#21
... In liquid form, it will digest much quicker and those carb/sugar will flow quickly into the blood stream thus giving the athlete a faster boost of energy, than actually chewing the banana. I didn't see too many tennis players do it, or maybe they do and I am just not seeing it.

Thoughts?
ok remove the strawberries then.

Isn't banana in liquid digest much faster than actually eating the banana through the digestive system?
Very rapid digestion with a quick sugar rise in the blood stream is not necessarily a good thing as @Znak has pointed out. An insulin reaction to a blood sugar spike can, after a relatively short time, result in a lower blood sugar level (possibly less energy rather than more energy in the long run).

Note: The quantity & ripeness of the bananas ingested can be a significant factor with regards to energy/blood sugar levels. (Not certain if Potassium levels change much with ripeness). Under-ripe bananas will have a different carb profile than Over-ripe bananas. The carb content for under-ripe will be more complex/starchier -- likely has a significantly lower glycemic impact. As bananas ripen, the carbs are converted more to simpler sugars. Hence the sweeter taste (and difference in texture). The glycemic impact is greater -- more likely to result in an insulin spike.

Don't believe that smoothies or full-strength juices (like OJ, strawberry juice, etc) are a good thing during intense competition. Too many carbs. Carb content is too high or carb concentration is too great. Low or very moderate carb intake might be ok during competition, but high carb intake can be counterproductive (not just benign). Fluid/electrolyte replacement (sports) drinks limit carb content on purpose. The makers are aware that high carb intakes can be detrimental. Elite athletes will often further limit carbs/electrolytes by alternating their sports drink intake with "plain" water.
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#23
As for the thread topic, bananas already digest really quickly. Why spend 20mins preparing some complicated drink when you can just throw a banana in your bag? These guys are busy enough as it is during tournaments
 
#36
I think Bananas brown quickly so if you made smoothies, they'd either have to be made right before the match or chilled cold. I don't think this would be successful in hot conditions.

I think Mother Nature already perfected the fruit.
 
#37
I see professional players do this all the times during the change over or during the break between sets. I get why they take a few bites of banana to give themselves an energy boost.

Why not just take the banana and a few strawberries + plus water to turn it into liquid smoothies. In liquid form, it will digest much quicker and those carb/sugar will flow quickly into the blood stream thus giving the athlete a faster boost of energy, than actually chewing the banana. I didn't see too many tennis players do it, or maybe they do and I am just not seeing it.

Thoughts?
Gerber's Baby Food?. Banana. Contains all the vitamins and energy of a regular banana. Plus, it's prechewed consistency, saves players time thus conserving energy. This product could lead to be YUGE endorsement opportunities for the tours biggest crybabies, like Bernard Tomic and Serena Williams.
 
#41
Please explain RF ate pasta with chicken before the matches?
Source on this? Or are we supposed to take your word on this? Never heard this before.

Where these prior to matches he won? Full meals or just a light snack? How long before his match were these meals (or snacks) ingested? I know that I'd have a hard time exercising/playing with a belly full of food. Some ppl seem to make a habit of doing this tho'. When play/exercise becomes more intense (more than light or casual), blood flow is diverted from the stomach/digestive processes and redirected to the muscle being recruited for the physical activity. If the digestive process is not very far along (in the intestines or blood stream), it might be delayed until after strenuous exercise is ceased.
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#42
Source on this? Or are we supposed to take your word on this? Never heard this before.

Where these prior to matches he won? Full meals or just a light snack? How long before his match were these meals (or snacks) ingested? I know that I'd have a hard time exercising/playing with a belly full of food. Some ppl seem to make a habit of doing this tho'. When play/exercise becomes more intense (more than light or casual), blood flow is diverted from the stomach/digestive processes and redirected to the muscle being recruited for the physical activity. If the digestive process is not very far along (in the intestines or blood stream), it might be delayed until after strenuous exercise is ceased.
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Hope this help: https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/what-does-roger-federer-eat-drinks-2018-4
 
#43
Please explain RF ate pasta with chicken before the matches?
Thanks for that link. Do you have another source in addition to this? No mention of chicken here (that I noticed). This link indicates that he eats pasta with a light sauce 2 hours prior to tennis. Pasta is a good carb source to build up glycogen storage in the liver & muscles and increase blood sugar levels in the bloodstream. Glycogen provides a source of fuel while physically active. Fat and blood sugar are the other primary sources of energy.

2 hours should be adequate time to digest the pasta that Roger is consuming. The light sauce should not hamper (slow down) the digestive process very much. A heavy sauce might slow down digestion. If large amounts of fat, protein and fiber are taken with a meal, the digestive process is slower. Whey protein is digested very quickly by humans but most other protein sources can take several hours to digest. So best not too consume too much protein (fat or fiber) too close to match time -- except, perhaps for whey protein.

While his pasta meal might provide somewhat more glycogen (and raise his blood sugar a bit) for his upcoming match, it might also be providing some glycogen storage for his subsequent matches (the next day or 2 days later).
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#44
You load up on carbs before an intense match for sustained energy release and you eat protein afterwards to help rebuild muscles. As always, everything in moderation. Hydrating well in advance of the match is more important than anything.
 
#45
Why not just take the banana and a few strawberries + plus water to turn it into liquid smoothies. In liquid form, it will digest much quicker and those carb/sugar will flow quickly into the blood stream thus giving the athlete a faster boost of energy, than actually chewing the banana
I see how you're thinking but there are other considerations too. When you chew food you body creates more bile which aids digestion in some ways - including the speed. When you're running around a court your body is focused on other things and having a food in smoothy form may not have as many advantages as you think - it might digest too quickly and make you want to go to the bathroom sooner, or give you gas etc. There is a thing as having too many fluids, especially when the player are already sipping sports concentrates as well.
 
#46
Thanks for that link. Do you have another source in addition to this? No mention of chicken here (that I noticed). This link indicates that he eats pasta with a light sauce 2 hours prior to tennis. Pasta is a good carb source to build up glycogen storage in the liver & muscles and increase blood sugar levels in the bloodstream. Glycogen provides a source of fuel while physically active. Fat and blood sugar are the other primary sources of energy.

2 hours should be adequate time to digest the pasta that Roger is consuming. The light sauce should not hamper (slow down) the digestive process very much. A heavy sauce might slow down digestion. If large amounts of fat, protein and fiber are taken with a meal, the digestive process is slower. Whey protein is digested very quickly by humans but most other protein sources can take several hours to digest. So best not too consume too much protein (fat or fiber) too close to match time -- except, perhaps for whey protein.

While his pasta meal might provide somewhat more glycogen (and raise his blood sugar a bit) for his upcoming match, it might also be providing some glycogen storage for his subsequent matches (the next day or 2 days later).
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I read it somewhere on the net but I need to find it.
 
#49
@SystemicAnomaly

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/m.m...ience-behind-all-star-athletes-pre-game-meals

This may help a bit but I’m pretty sure he ate chicken pasta, two hours before the matches.
This account seems to be somewhat different from the previous one. The 1st link indicated that he ate pasta with a light sauce (no mention of chicken) 2 hours before playing. This 2nd account says that he was eating his pasta the previous night -- it is very common for athletes to pasta-load (or carb-load) the night before competition. In the latter article, he was reportedly eating a chicken salad with a smoothie for his pre-match meal This is a little bit unusual for a modern elite athlete. However, if he is eating this at least 2 hours prior to playing and he's not pigging out with huge servings, he is probably ok with this slightly odd choice. He should have enough time to digest most of this as long as it's not a massive amount of food.

More about Roger & pasta:
https://www.foodandwine.com/news/roger-federer-declares-his-longtime-invisible-supporter-ispasta
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#50
This account seems to be somewhat different from the previous one. The 1st link indicated that he ate pasta with a light sauce (no mention of chicken) 2 hours before playing. This 2nd account says that he was eating his pasta the previous night -- it is very common for athletes to pasta-load (or carb-load) the night before competition. In the latter article, he was reportedly eating a chicken salad with a smoothie for his pre-match meal This is a little bit unusual for a modern elite athlete. However, if he is eating this at least 2 hours prior to playing and he's not pigging out with huge servings, he is probably ok with this slightly odd choice. He should have enough time to digest most of this as long as it's not a massive amount of food.

More about Roger & pasta:
https://www.foodandwine.com/news/roger-federer-declares-his-longtime-invisible-supporter-ispasta
.
Thanks for the link. I was pretty sure that he ate pasta with chicken. It’s just that I couldn’t find the right link that I read it like before Australian Open. He did say he ate them during Wimbledon if I remember correctly.
 
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