Bad timing due to weight loss?

mightyrick

Legend
Hi guys,

So I rarely ask questions on here, but I actually have a strange situation that I'm looking seriously for advice on. When I went to hit out in San Diego, I was about a week into a healthy diet. At the beginning of my diet, I was 212 pounds. That was on August 7th. Also keep in mind that I started playing tennis in 2009 and my weight then was 205 pounds. So I've never played tennis at less than 200 pounds.

Today, I weigh 185 pounds -- 27 pounds lost. I'm proud of how I've done on the diet. I'm proud of how I'm eating now. That's all good. Here is my problem:

For the last two weeks, I have gotten increasingly WORSE when it comes to my strokes. I am moving around the court faster than ever before. I am getting into position and preparing earlier than ever before. My movement is night and day. However, I am shanking balls all over the place now. I'm early on all of my shots. It is very uncharacteristic of how I usually play. I find myself waiting on the ball all the time now. My timing is just horrible.

Does anybody think I need to change racquets or add lead or anything? Or is this just a temporary phase and I need to give myself several weeks to find new timing? It really is screwing me up badly right now. I used to have to anticipate and start moving so early to get to the ball in time. Now, I'm there WAY too early.

Any advice is appreciated. I may just have to be patient and wait it out.
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
I think it's just a phase as you adapt to get your timing and balance recalibrated. The weight shifting has changed dramatically! Congrats on the weight loss!
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Yeah, I find even a 5 lbs gain or loss affects my timing, especially on wide shots.
I"m going thru a transition stage for the past two years, going really handicapped to getting better and almost able to run a bit lately. Constant mishits during the transitions.
 

mightyrick

Legend
Yes, you need to buy 27lbs of lead and tape it to your belly. You will get your timing back.

Congrats on weight loss. With enough practice you will get used to the new, faster movement. Soon you will be able to beat LeeD and Sureshs in a 1 on 2 match.
This made me laugh out loud this morning, lol.
 

jersey34tennis

Professional
try improving footwork to take it earlier. i went from 215 to 195 but added decent muscle and was early until i realized an extra step or 2 solved the issue
 

Fintft

Legend
There was something that more advanced players talked about here and that is, rathen than preparing earlier, they use a continous stroke (and in fact preparing somewhat late, if I'm not mistaken).
 

TennisCJC

Legend
Yea, just working on maintaining balance and maybe slow your stroke as you approach contact. Maybe use speed 2 for takeback and start of forward motion and accelerate to speed 7 right before contact. Bend at the knees to maintain balance and use small steps around contact to get good spacing. On balance with smooth approach to ball should help you find the sweetspot. I bet you adjust quickly.
 

agentplaid

New User
I had the same situation a couple of years ago after dropping about 65 pounds. Once I convinced myself that I didn't have to run as hard to the ball, most of my timing recovered. The rest was being able to take smaller steps into the ball since I wasn't late to the spot anymore. It'll come back with practice.
 

BMC9670

Hall of Fame
Yeah, I find even a 5 lbs gain or loss affects my timing, especially on wide shots.
I hear you. It takes me a good week after a haircut to get my timing back, especially at the net. And by that time, my shoes are worn down enough that I'm off balance again and there goes my slice! Damn.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Of course a change of weight matters.
Try bearing a 5 lbs weight belt, then go hit some balls.
 

GuyClinch

Legend
You sure its the weight loss? I mean most normal people lose 1.5lbs a week so if you play every week you won't notice it. I bet you took some time off...right? Its probably the time off.. You will adjust.
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
There was something that more advanced players talked about here and that is, rathen than preparing earlier, they use a continous stroke (and in fact preparing somewhat late, if I'm not mistaken).
Never late,.... but yes, later! But also depends on what you mean by preparing early, because some are calling stalking with 2 hand still on the racket an early prep.
 

Fugazi

Professional
Hi guys,

So I rarely ask questions on here, but I actually have a strange situation that I'm looking seriously for advice on. When I went to hit out in San Diego, I was about a week into a healthy diet. At the beginning of my diet, I was 212 pounds. That was on August 7th. Also keep in mind that I started playing tennis in 2009 and my weight then was 205 pounds. So I've never played tennis at less than 200 pounds.

Today, I weigh 185 pounds -- 27 pounds lost. I'm proud of how I've done on the diet. I'm proud of how I'm eating now. That's all good. Here is my problem:

For the last two weeks, I have gotten increasingly WORSE when it comes to my strokes. I am moving around the court faster than ever before. I am getting into position and preparing earlier than ever before. My movement is night and day. However, I am shanking balls all over the place now. I'm early on all of my shots. It is very uncharacteristic of how I usually play. I find myself waiting on the ball all the time now. My timing is just horrible.

Does anybody think I need to change racquets or add lead or anything? Or is this just a temporary phase and I need to give myself several weeks to find new timing? It really is screwing me up badly right now. I used to have to anticipate and start moving so early to get to the ball in time. Now, I'm there WAY too early.

Any advice is appreciated. I may just have to be patient and wait it out.
If you shank, it's probably because you take your eyes off the ball.
 

Fintft

Legend
So
Never late,.... but yes, later! But also depends on what you mean by preparing early, because some are calling stalking with 2 hand still on the racket an early prep.
Thanks and so when exactly do advanced players start their fluent/continuous stroke? And are we talking racquet take back or from there onwards?
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
So

Thanks and so when exactly do advanced players start their fluent/continuous stroke? And are we talking racquet take back or from there onwards?
First we must realize it all happens in a sec or 2, so it must be basically continuous to go to what many call the unit turn with both hands on the racket (stalking for us), then to release (where the left hand releases the throat to stretch across and the right hand floats back just a bit with the racket head still forward and to the side), the flipping to the slot as the shoulder turn starts to bring the hand to find the ball/poc (in the ATP stroke). Stalking and release moves both adjust well for timing and are continuous but can have slight pauses as well. The flip allows you to move instantly towards the POC as you time the bounce.
 

mightyrick

Legend
You sure its the weight loss? I mean most normal people lose 1.5lbs a week so if you play every week you won't notice it. I bet you took some time off...right? Its probably the time off.. You will adjust.
I lost a bit more per week than that. I really had a horrible diet (averaged 3500 to 4000 calories per day). So I dropped my calorie intake to match what would be required of my target weight (which was 180lbs). Once I did that, I lost 30 pounds in six weeks. So it was pretty drastic from a rate of loss perspective.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
if you lost that much weight, you should be able to move quicker to the ball giving yourself more time to set up properly. in a sense, the game should have slowed down for you. perhaps this extra time is causing you to be early?
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Just being quicker takes an adjustment period.
You can just add or subtract 7 lbs. and expect the same results on court.
 

Fintft

Legend
First we must realize it all happens in a sec or 2, so it must be basically continuous to go to what many call the unit turn with both hands on the racket (stalking for us), then to release (where the left hand releases the throat to stretch across and the right hand floats back just a bit with the racket head still forward and to the side), the flipping to the slot as the shoulder turn starts to bring the hand to find the ball/poc (in the ATP stroke). Stalking and release moves both adjust well for timing and are continuous but can have slight pauses as well. The flip allows you to move instantly towards the POC as you time the bounce.
Thanks and it does sound very similar to the what I'm trying to do :)
 
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