Battle by the Border: Matt Lin vs. San Diego

They are really good that's why. They are too practiced compared to you. Nav plays tennis it seems as a job lol.
That's my goal, anyway - 10 hours a week if I can. Unfortunately, I've only been playing twice a week for the last couple of months - crappy weather (it happens even here sometimes!), minor maintenance issues, brief illness, injured hitting partners... it's all conspired against me. Hopefully back to "work" in February!
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
That's my goal, anyway - 10 hours a week if I can. Unfortunately, I've only been playing twice a week for the last couple of months - crappy weather (it happens even here sometimes!), minor maintenance issues, brief illness, injured hitting partners... it's all conspired against me. Hopefully back to "work" in February!
2019 is beating me like I forgot to take the chicken out of the freezer.

J
 
That's my goal, anyway - 10 hours a week if I can. Unfortunately, I've only been playing twice a week for the last couple of months - crappy weather (it happens even here sometimes!), minor maintenance issues, brief illness, injured hitting partners... it's all conspired against me. Hopefully back to "work" in February!
I generally log 8 hours with the occasional 10 hour week a plus. I also do 15-30 minutes a day of push ups, sit ups, planks, yoga, and stretching. That’s about all this 56 year old body can tolerate.


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You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing.

J
Never have truer words been spoken! There are two guys at the local tennis center where I play regularly that are both 10 years my senior and competitive with kids on the division one team! And we are not talking about just any Division I teams, if you know what I mean! They have truly been inspirations to me. When injured they have offered support, encouragement, counsel, and mentorship. On the court, they have been in many ways my role models. On the court, they have been in many ways my role models. It is my goal to continue playing and playing well into my 70s and 80s, perhaps beyond if the opportunity is afforded me!


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You don't stop playing because you get old, you get old because you stop playing.

J
One of those profound statements with little real-life basis.

Of the two people I know who stopped playing recently (both were 75+), one fell on the court and broke several hand bones, and the other stopped because he was not hitting well anymore and could not find hitting partners or doubles people who would be willing to play with him. And a third one has practically stopped playing - his spare time is all going to take care of his daughter's kid (she is with a no-income kind of guy) and his much older in-laws who have decided to move to the US and settle down in his home.

Then there are those who saw how older guys were losing their balance and falling on the court, and then slowly getting kicked out of their former circles, and have already switched to golf and pickleball.

Growing old is not easy, and playing tennis will not keep you young, as some think.
 
One of those profound statements with little real-life basis.

Of the two people I know who stopped playing recently (both were 75+), one fell on the court and broke several hand bones, and the other stopped because he was not hitting well anymore and could not find hitting partners or doubles people who would be willing to play with him. And a third one has practically stopped playing - his spare time is all going to take care of his daughter's kid (she is with a no-income kind of guy) and his much older in-laws who have decided to move to the US and settle down in his home.

Then there are those who saw how older guys were losing their balance and falling on the court, and then slowly getting kicked out of their former circles, and have already switched to golf and pickleball.

Growing old is not easy, and playing tennis will not keep you young, as some think.
Party Gopuper, well it's prob the fitness routines that keep us on the court, but who's counting. That said eventually it will be time to shoot the horse
 
Growing old is not easy, and playing tennis will not keep you young, as some think.
The big issue is injury. If you can avoid serious injury and keep playing actively, then playing a lot of tennis will help to keep you young. If you get a serious injury, then all bets are off. Injury leads to inactivity which leads to weight gain which tends to aggravate the injury (as it's generally from the waist down - back, hip, knee, ankle, foot, etc)... and you have a vicious cycle that's hard to break out of. But if you can avoid serious injury and keep playing... if it's not great exercise and thus helping to maintain your health then you're doing something wrong.
 
The big issue is injury. If you can avoid serious injury and keep playing actively, then playing a lot of tennis will help to keep you young. If you get a serious injury, then all bets are off. Injury leads to inactivity which leads to weight gain which tends to aggravate the injury (as it's generally from the waist down - back, hip, knee, ankle, foot, etc)... and you have a vicious cycle that's hard to break out of. But if you can avoid serious injury and keep playing... if it's not great exercise and thus helping to maintain your health then you're doing something wrong.
But the whole problem lies in "avoid serious injury." It is not something that someone can predict. Almost all players after a few years know to avoid things like playing when slippery, standing close to the net when not prepared, turning around to avoid being rammed by an overhead, etc. It is things like loss of balance or slipping or skidding which they cannot consciously avoid.
 
But the whole problem lies in "avoid serious injury." It is not something that someone can predict. Almost all players after a few years know to avoid things like playing when slippery, standing close to the net when not prepared, turning around to avoid being rammed by an overhead, etc. It is things like loss of balance or slipping or skidding which they cannot consciously avoid.
suresh makes a good point here. I don't know anyone that comes out to look for injuries!!!!! LOL.


It's not a question of "can" or "cannot". You just roll your dice.


However, generally speaking, playing is better than not playing, regardless of age.
 
One old guy slipped and broke his hand when chasing down a lob.

One 4.5 guy in his 50s fell last week and has bruised ribs.

One 4.0 guy I played against tried to chase down my topspin lob but it bounced very high and far and he crashed into the fence, and his legs and hands were bleeding.

One woman almost fell trying to get to one of my backhand slices which had enormous side spin.

Several guys including me have been hit in the head by their partner's serves.

One guy's glasses flew off when he was standing close to the net and got hit.
 
One old guy slipped and broke his hand when chasing down a lob.

One 4.5 guy in his 50s fell last week and has bruised ribs.

One 4.0 guy I played against tried to chase down my topspin lob but it bounced very high and far and he crashed into the fence, and his legs and hands were bleeding.

One woman almost fell trying to get to one of my backhand slices which had enormous side spin.

Several guys including me have been hit in the head by their partner's serves.

One guy's glasses flew off when he was standing close to the net and got hit.
Did they come up with creative ways to stop playing with you? Sounds like fake "accidents".
 
But the whole problem lies in "avoid serious injury." It is not something that someone can predict. Almost all players after a few years know to avoid things like playing when slippery, standing close to the net when not prepared, turning around to avoid being rammed by an overhead, etc. It is things like loss of balance or slipping or skidding which they cannot consciously avoid.
True. The most important thing one can do - if at all possible - is avoid playing on hard courts. The benefits of playing on grass and clay - from an injury reduction standpoint - are well documented:

"The ATP study(2) also analysed the impact on injuries of the court surface, finding clay far more forgiving than grass or hard court, with 0.2 treatments per match on clay compared with 0.37 and 0.42 on hard court and grass respectively. Clay is a slower, softer surface, encouraging a less explosive style of tennis, and this was seen as the reason behind the lesser injury rate. Artificial grass, commonly seen at local tennis clubs, has similar qualities to clay."

http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/tennis-injuries.htm#

"This study clearly connects tennis injuries of the lower extremities, back and groin, with two factors: the court surface and the shoe. Surfaces like clay that allow sliding resulted in approximately 75% fewer injuries than surfaces which did not."

http://www.seapinestennisresort.com/pages/index.cfm?siteid=13621

If you're playing most or all of your tennis on hard courts, you're asking for problems (eventually).
 
But the whole problem lies in "avoid serious injury." It is not something that someone can predict. Almost all players after a few years know to avoid things like playing when slippery, standing close to the net when not prepared, turning around to avoid being rammed by an overhead, etc. It is things like loss of balance or slipping or skidding which they cannot consciously avoid.
You can avoid injury by staying in shape and maintaining flexibility. The injuries caused by wear and tear are less likely to happen if you aren’t carrying 30 extra pounds around.
 
True. The most important thing one can do - if at all possible - is avoid playing on hard courts. The benefits of playing on grass and clay - from an injury reduction standpoint - are well documented:

"The ATP study(2) also analysed the impact on injuries of the court surface, finding clay far more forgiving than grass or hard court, with 0.2 treatments per match on clay compared with 0.37 and 0.42 on hard court and grass respectively. Clay is a slower, softer surface, encouraging a less explosive style of tennis, and this was seen as the reason behind the lesser injury rate. Artificial grass, commonly seen at local tennis clubs, has similar qualities to clay."

http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/tennis-injuries.htm#

"This study clearly connects tennis injuries of the lower extremities, back and groin, with two factors: the court surface and the shoe. Surfaces like clay that allow sliding resulted in approximately 75% fewer injuries than surfaces which did not."

http://www.seapinestennisresort.com/pages/index.cfm?siteid=13621

If you're playing most or all of your tennis on hard courts, you're asking for problems (eventually).
Don't have much of a choice there. Not everyone is retired with a ton of money and a personal clay court at home and traveling to European clay court destinations like someone on this forum :)

Closest are the two red clay courts in the resort but that is when I get invited there.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
But the whole problem lies in "avoid serious injury." It is not something that someone can predict. Almost all players after a few years know to avoid things like playing when slippery, standing close to the net when not prepared, turning around to avoid being rammed by an overhead, etc. It is things like loss of balance or slipping or skidding which they cannot consciously avoid.
if you want to take a active role in preventing injury,...

*stretching daily... goes way past trying to touch your toes... take yoga class or something... a good stretch routine is mildly painful, and quite strenuous... which is why most don’t do it.... helps when you go past your normal range of motion unintentionally
*resistance training... to be able to withstand the burst start/stops
*ample rest to recover...
*eat well, keep the weight down
*balance work (isolation exercises (eg. single leg romanians), kettle bell stuff like turkish getups, balance boards, single leg stuff, bosu ball stuff, mace training, etc,...)... helps prevent losing you balance in the first place
*learn how to fall! (judo, bjj, etc,... lol i’ve saved my arse rolling out of a fall many times)
*run/sprints... get in shape to play tennis, don’t expect tennis to get you in shape,... fatigue is a big contributor of breaking form, losing balance, etc,...

or you can continue to preach “oh there’s nothing I can do to prevent injury,... it just happens...”


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if you want to take a active role in preventing injury,...

*stretching daily... goes way past trying to touch your toes... take yoga class or something... a good stretch routine is mildly painful, and quite strenuous... which is why most don’t do it.... helps when you go past your normal range of motion unintentionally
*resistance training... to be able to withstand the burst start/stops
*ample rest to recover...
*eat well, keep the weight down
*balance work (isolation exercises (eg. single leg romanians), kettle bell stuff like turkish getups, balance boards, single leg stuff, bosu ball stuff, mace training, etc,...)... helps prevent losing you balance in the first place
*learn how to fall! (judo, bjj, etc,... lol i’ve saved my arse rolling out of a fall many times)
*run/sprints... get in shape to play tennis, don’t expect tennis to get you in shape,... fatigue is a big contributor of breaking form, losing balance, etc,...

or you can continue to preach “oh there’s nothing I can do to prevent injury,... it just happens...”


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I have time only for work and tennis
 
Don't have much of a choice there. Not everyone is retired with a ton of money and a personal clay court at home and traveling to European clay court destinations like someone on this forum :)

Closest are the two red clay courts in the resort but that is when I get invited there.
I understand your point but I was really addressing folks who have reasonable access to clay and/or grass (mainly Mid Atlantic and and the South in the US). Personally, if I only had access to hard courts I'd keep playing down to maybe 2x per week and start going to the gym. But that's just me.

The lack of clay in Southern California is brutal for long-term tennis health.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I have time only for work and tennis
yeah then I agree, if you’re only playing tennis, as your sole form of exercise, and are competitive,... it’s possible that it’s beyond “moderate” exercise, and can hurt you, especially if you’re the weekend warrior type and go all out once or twice a week, without prepping your body for battle (or allowing it proper recovery and restorative exercises)

it’s the difference between jogging to burn some calories... vs trying to win a running race without any prep.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
if you want to take a active role in preventing injury,...

*stretching daily... goes way past trying to touch your toes... take yoga class or something... a good stretch routine is mildly painful, and quite strenuous... which is why most don’t do it.... helps when you go past your normal range of motion unintentionally
*resistance training... to be able to withstand the burst start/stops
*ample rest to recover...
*eat well, keep the weight down
*balance work (isolation exercises (eg. single leg romanians), kettle bell stuff like turkish getups, balance boards, single leg stuff, bosu ball stuff, mace training, etc,...)... helps prevent losing you balance in the first place
*learn how to fall! (judo, bjj, etc,... lol i’ve saved my arse rolling out of a fall many times)
*run/sprints... get in shape to play tennis, don’t expect tennis to get you in shape,... fatigue is a big contributor of breaking form, losing balance, etc,...

or you can continue to preach “oh there’s nothing I can do to prevent injury,... it just happens...”


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I think i'll skip #6
 
True. The most important thing one can do - if at all possible - is avoid playing on hard courts. The benefits of playing on grass and clay - from an injury reduction standpoint - are well documented:

"The ATP study(2) also analysed the impact on injuries of the court surface, finding clay far more forgiving than grass or hard court, with 0.2 treatments per match on clay compared with 0.37 and 0.42 on hard court and grass respectively. Clay is a slower, softer surface, encouraging a less explosive style of tennis, and this was seen as the reason behind the lesser injury rate. Artificial grass, commonly seen at local tennis clubs, has similar qualities to clay."

http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/tennis-injuries.htm#

"This study clearly connects tennis injuries of the lower extremities, back and groin, with two factors: the court surface and the shoe. Surfaces like clay that allow sliding resulted in approximately 75% fewer injuries than surfaces which did not."

http://www.seapinestennisresort.com/pages/index.cfm?siteid=13621

If you're playing most or all of your tennis on hard courts, you're asking for problems (eventually).
The 1st link doesn't work..The 2nd link looks like an advertisement for that club..But i agree clay is better for club players..The top age group guys are strong and in top shape and can play for many years on hard courts..:)
 
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