Berdych considering retirement

hipolymer

Hall of Fame
I'll always remember him as the guy who dressed up like a 5 year old toddler on the highest of stages
 

chimneysweep

Semi-Pro
He was a solid player. It is a shame he couldnt pull out 1 slam win.

A lot of people dont seem to like him so I am sure a lot will be happy at this news.

I did find his shrill voice and contentment as a second tier player a bit annoying at time.s
 

Purplemonster

Hall of Fame
Philippoussis is nowhere close to players like Ferrer in achievements.

He lost in 1R ot 2R in 20 slams out of 38 and never qualified for the YEC, LOL
Too funny, yet he made it to the US Open and Wimbledon finals. Dimitrov has won the YEC, that says a lot.
 

Meles

Bionic Poster
First of all, I don't trust Elo all that much when judging form, since that is where it's application is arguably weakest. I don't think I need to state any reasons why as the subject has been done to death. That being said, the ratings seem accurate enough, but I have a few counter-points which I'll cover as we go on.

Second of all, this entire discussion is all about the comparison to Jack Sock's 2017 Paris Masters draw. I haven't yet tried to argue that it was the toughest draw ever or anywhere close to that; merely that it consisted of a tougher batch of opponents than what Sock had to face. Your recent Elo list seems to back that statement up pretty neatly considering most of the above players likely have better numbers than anyone Sock played except for probably Verdasco. I have no stats to give but I strongly believe that's the case even without looking.

Third of all, in my previous post, I mentioned that Coria, despite the service yips (thank you for noticing that; I had overlooked it), was a very good second round opponent. You might be using a different metric, but I like to judge opponents based on how well they stack up compared to others in their position. Kyrgios in the semifinal of a Grand Slam would be considered a weak opponent, but slide him back to the second round and he automatically becomes a tough opponent. You see what I mean?

2005+ Coria being the semifinal opponent of an indoor Masters would be enough evidence to claim that Berdych's draw was weak, but he was drawn very early on so that game can't be played. So, tough relative to the round number. The same goes for Ferrero in the third round. Gaudio, I can agree, was a weaker quarterfinal opponent while Stepanek and Ljubicic more or less played to the required level. You have that going for you there.

Fourth of all, why are we bringing Khachanov into this? I never brought him up in the first place; the discussion was purely about Paris 2005 vs. Paris 2017. While we're on the topic, Khachanov's Paris win was truly impressive, even more so than Berdych's which I've been fiercely defending here. Krajinovic, Ebden, Isner, Zverev, Thiem, and Djokovic is by no means an easy draw. I'd say it's one of the hardest Paris draws I've seen in recent memory. To add on to that, he dropped only one set and it was to tiebreak god Isner. Bit early to say Khachanov is better than Berdych though.

I think that's all. It's been an interesting discussion so far.
Actually Recent Elo is a new thing and has not been discussed.;) It is an excellent barometer of recent form. It has a very short tail so right now Thiem is 5 which is ******** on grass, but for October after a long stretch of hard courts it is THE metric and superior to ranking. It is essentialy a recent hard court Elo for Berdy's Paris triumph. It is very interesting and for instance a player like FAA is 10 in the ATP race only is 23 on Recent Elo because he's not beaten a top playerer. Khachanov rightfully went from just outside the top 10 to 5 after his Paris run. He's now dropped to closer to 20 after bad start to the year (illness and racket change). It is a tool superior to ranking much of the time and just a tool in the bag for evaluating once you understand how its formulated

We agree completely and you are correct on Sock.

I merely bring up Khach to purt Berdy in perspective. He was part of the new generation of Poly baseliners in among the all court sheep, plus clay courters in Paris. The fact that he's never had even close to a comparable win says it all. Federistas like to build him up because of his Wimbledon final (and I'll admit Bendy was passable on fasterer surfaces where his inadequate serve (for height) was workable in the latter half of his career. Ultimately he was just not a winner because of his serve.
 

Meles

Bionic Poster
Too funny, yet he made it to the US Open and Wimbledon finals. Dimitrov has won the YEC, that says a lot.
Even for best of 3 tournaments serve is a huge asset. Ferrer was an utterly amazing return and great achievements for his short height, but the lack of serve really limited him. To his credit he generated good offense on hard courts which got him high in the rankings. Overall Ferrer far, far superior. Its not a fair metric, but Ferrer 31 millions dollars for his career and Mark just 7 million. If we're kind maybe a 3rd of Ferrer's career haul.
 

Third Serve

Legend
Actually Recent Elo is a new thing and has not been discussed.;) It is an excellent barometer of recent form. It has a very short tail so right now Thiem is 5 which is ******** on grass, but for October after a long stretch of hard courts it is THE metric and superior to ranking. It is essentialy a recent hard court Elo for Berdy's Paris triumph. It is very interesting and for instance a player like FAA is 10 in the ATP race only is 23 on Recent Elo because he's not beaten a top playerer. Khachanov rightfully went from just outside the top 10 to 5 after his Paris run. He's now dropped to closer to 20 after bad start to the year (illness and racket change). It is a tool superior to ranking much of the time and just a tool in the bag for evaluating once you understand how its formulated

We agree completely and you are correct on Sock.

I merely bring up Khach to purt Berdy in perspective. He was part of the new generation of Poly baseliners in among the all court sheep, plus clay courters in Paris. The fact that he's never had even close to a comparable win says it all. Federistas like to build him up because of his Wimbledon final (and I'll admit Bendy was passable on fasterer surfaces where his inadequate serve (for height) was workable in the latter half of his career. Ultimately he was just not a winner because of his serve.
Good to see. As for the bolded...

Well, I'm a "Federista" (although I have no idea where that came from) and I'm not trying to hype up Berdych so much. I was defending him if anything. I don't even like him that much. He's a great player, but nothing all too special.
 

Meles

Bionic Poster
Good to see. As for the bolded...

Well, I'm a "Federista" (although I have no idea where that came from) and I'm not trying to hype up Berdych so much. I was defending him if anything. I don't even like him that much. He's a great player, but nothing all too special.
Its my term based on Sandinista (Nicaragua). Glad to see you're not one at heart.;) Bendy has been a good heal these last few years.
 

Zardoz7/12

Professional
At 33, it feels like the end for Tomas Berdych

By Stephanie Myles July 17, 2019 - 3 minute read


He’s nine months older than Rafael Nadal, and four years younger than Roger Federer.
But it kind of feels like this might be it for former No. 4 Tomas Berdych.
The 33-year-old Czech missed the second half of 2018 with a back issue. And he began 2019 as though he was eager to make up for lost time.
He reached the final in Doha to open the 2019 season, beating Kohlschreiber, Verdasco, Herbert and Cecchinato before losing a three-setter to Roberto Bautista Agut in the final.
Then he made the fourth round in Australia, beating top-20 players Edmund and Schwartzman before losing to Rafael Nadal. And he followed that up with a semifinal effort in Montpellier, France.
But after losing in the first round at Indian Wells, he was out again – and didn’t return until Wimbledon. It wasn’t only the back now, it also was the left hip.
At the All-England Club, he lost in three quick sets to Taylor Fritz.
Berdych looked fine in his practice sessions before Wimbledon. But he lost his first-round match in straight sets and now, he’s out for the summer.Out of the summer hard courts
Berdych had entered Washington, Montreal and Cincinnati with his protected ranking of No. 57.
But now, he has withdrawn from all of them.
Berdych had also accepted a wild card into the Winston-Salem ATP Tour event, the week before the US Open. No word on the fate of that.
The Czech had always seemed to be the most durable of top players. He played 52 consecutive Grand Slam events, from the 2003 US Open until he missed the same event 13 years later, in 2016.
Between the 2005 edition of Indian Wells and the 2016 Italian Open – 113 Masters 1000 events in all – the Czech missed just … three.
He averaged 23 tournaments and 72 matches a season between 2005 and 2015. He’s also played over 200 doubles matches in his career and, for years, was a stalwart for the Czech Republic in Davis Cup.
Maybe all that mileage is catching up to him now. But after working so hard last year to get back in form to return, it must be discouraging to be forced to miss even more time.
If it is the end, it’s been a fine career.
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
I recall him saying that he thought this might be his last Wimbledon but it depends on how well he can recover I guess.
 

Zardoz7/12

Professional
Brooksby, Berdych face decisions on futures after US Open
By Associated Press New York State
PUBLISHED 9:48 PM ET Aug. 26, 2019

NEW YORK (AP) — Jenson Brooksby's only guaranteed destination now is the second round of the U.S. Open.
College tennis may no longer be in the plans.
"It's up in the air," Brooksby said.
So is Tomas Berdych's future.
The 18-year-old Brooksby earned his first Grand Slam win Monday with a 6-1, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory over Berdych, who said he is "very close" to considering retirement after an injury-plagued season.
"That's very frustrating. When you do the whole preparation, everything's fine, goes well and then you get on court and basically there's no way I can compete with the guys in this shape," Berdych said.
He couldn't do much over the final two sets against Brooksby, a Californian who was set to play at Baylor University after the year's final major tournament.
But he was reconsidering even before he went through qualifying to reach the main draw, and then knocked off the 2010 Wimbledon finalist and 2012 U.S. Open semifinalist.
"I still thought there was a chance I don't go," Brooksby said. "But the more I win here, obviously the more likely it could go in the other direction."
He looked ready for the pros while confidently recovering after the second set in front of a crowd that loudly backed him. Brooksby lost in the first round last year as a wild card but felt better about his chances this year after getting higher-level tournament experience.
An even younger American came oh-so-close to pulling off another surprise later Monday, but 16-year-old Zachary Svajda of California couldn't quite hold on after building a two-set lead against 37-year-old Paolo Lorenzi of Italy, eventually succumbing 3-6, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-2.
The age gap of 21 years was the largest between male opponents at a Grand Slam tournament since 1978.
Svajda, who earned his berth in New York by winning the U.S. 18s national championship, was the youngest man in the main draw at Flushing Meadows since Donald Young also was 16 in 2005.
Players are guaranteed $100,000 for reaching the second round of singles play at the U.S. Open, though Brooksby would have to give up his amateur future if he takes it. That makes his decision even more difficult.
"Yeah, it's definitely financial because, like, I would get four years of free college if I went just for one semester, compared to just the money I earn here," he said. "So got to figure that all out."
Berdych has his own thinking to do, though his body may already be giving him the answers.
Back and left hip injuries forced him to miss four months before Wimbledon and another month after before he came back for the U.S. Open with limited preparation. There wasn't much power in the shots of a player who was No. 4 in the world only four-plus years ago, with some second serves coming in the mid-80 mph range.
"Today I felt terrible on the court, to be honest," Berdych said.
There have been too many days like that as he prepares to turn 34 next month. He fell out of the top 100 earlier this year for the first time since Jan. 26, 2004 — seven months before beating Roger Federer in the Olympics — and perhaps soon may be out of tennis entirely.
"I mean, this was my third try that I tried and really I cannot find much the right solution that can get through it," he said. "Also, I'm not 24 anymore."
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
You simply think that having a big serve/forehand means higher peak. Ferrer destroyed the field in 2010-15. His problem were just peaking Big4, which Philippoussis didn't play.
No. Healthy late 90’s Scud was really really good. His problem was peaking Rafter.
 

RS

Hall of Fame
You simply think that having a big serve/forehand means higher peak. Ferrer destroyed the field in 2010-15. His problem were just peaking Big4, which Philippoussis didn't play.
Ferrer was really in good in 2007 as well. Possibly his 3rd best tour year behind 2012-2013.
 
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ChrisRF

Hall of Fame
Once again proving how stats can be misleading. Ferrer was never as good as peak Scud, just more consistent with a longer career.
Ferrer has beaten all of Nadal, Djokovic and Murray at least 5 times. Only against Federer he was without any chance. That's a nice peak on top of his consistency against lesser opponents for many years.

You are underrating him, and I think for once Lew is right when he says you got deceived by Philippoussis’ style of play which looked more crushing of course.
 

robthai

Hall of Fame
shame he hadn't reached his peak yet. In this age, players don't reach their peak level until they are 35 and over.
 

Zardoz7/12

Professional
Link to Article

Two-time Australian Open semi-finalist Tomas Berdych has retired from tennis and will make an official announcement at the ATP Finals in London on Saturday, his father has said.
Berdych's father, Martin, told the Czech paper Blesk on Wednesday about the decision which his son seemed to confirm in an online video, saying: "it was supposed to be a surprise."
"I had it planned as a little surprise on Saturday where I'm going to be in London," he said.
 
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