Best cars in world ???

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
You are the complete opposite of a realist. Doing all these individual things is very responsible, but it doesn't shift the dial. For that only massive political action will do.

I just choose not to be a hypocrite and also am a realist. I realise that my standards for what is acceptable is vastly different than that of people in other positions, and while one might say that those that are in a better position should lead the way, I say to them let those in the best position do that. I refuse to take the brunt of politics that won't even touch the people with the greatest impact just to have a position. Obviously, I can afford that, as nothing of what you say will have a serious impact on my personal life, so I am not going to pretend otherwise.

If we look at the matter on a large scale, the Western world has absolutely no right to pretend that they are doing "the right thing" as we are responsible for a consumerism on a scale not seen before in the history of humanity, and as much as we want to talk about our "principled" position we live in an excess that is not in accordance with that philosophy of caring about the environment. I would like to say that I do my share of environmental protection, by choosing to have various things that are sustainable and employ skilled labor rather than machines, and I choose to not fly as much as possible, I recycle heavily, and all my homes are equipped with solar and heat pumps, but that is as much as I am willing to do. Philosophical approach towards protecting the environment, when I play a sport with synthetic shoes, graphite and composite racquets, plastic racquet bags and apparel, courts made of asphalt and industrially produced surfaces etc is hypocricy. It is 100% harmful to the environment in its pointless purpose (enjoyment).

 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Cybertrukk
I was at the unveiling, it a doomsday looking survival looking vehicle and you can do a $200 deposit to save your spot to buy it. Medium caliber pistol cartridge bulletproof and shatterproof windows too. Front lights are very bright and cool looking. Made of stainless steel!
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Toyota/Lexus for quality, reliability and matainability - preferably the models that sell high volume.

Besides build quality, design and engineering, you want:

Maintainability - easy to repair, tools for repair available, parts availability, trained labor force, availability of service manuals, good dealer network and third-party repair network, manufacturer supports cars 20 years from purchase
Resale value might be a consideration
High production runs so that it's a commodity so that it's easier to sell on the used market
Insurabiliity - less costly to insure because parts and labor to repair are lower and available
 

acintya

Legend
for me?




not the fastest car but this actually could be one of the best "cruisers" on the world ATM for this price.

I just bought a 2017 version - used with 40.000km
im not kidding but this is for me currently the hottest car on the planet if we look at the exteriors.

I was always a big fan of Subaru Impreza WRX and this was modeled after it and Legacy Station Wagon.

I hope everything will be ok, the car is comming from Germany.
 
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Crocodile

Hall of Fame
For me it’s Lexus and Acura !!!!

Chrysler has cool looking cars but they don’t last .
GM should be out of business !!

Audi and BMW break down a ton

I would take an Acura
Pretty much on the money mate. Toyota slash Lexus number one. Would love a 1967 Toyota 2000gt. BMW stands for Big Money Wallet. My personal favourite used to be Datsun: Nissan, but only up to the 1990's with the 300zx., now they are a bit dissapointing with the exception of the Infiniti G37 coupe.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
For me it was a Saab 9-5 Aero, best ergonomics, timeless design and providing a very nice drive. However, they are out of business, so Volvo it is.
How was the cost of parts of Saab and were/are they reliable. My mechanic always thought they were shockers but I have a lady friend who has a 9000cd and she likes it, it's done over 260 000 kms. Lots of woman like Saabs, might be the safety and practicality factor. I don't mind the look at the 9000 griffin and the Volvo 850r.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
The problem with many EV cars is:
1. They are expensive to buy in many countries.
2. The batteries can lose their holding charge ( just like an iPhone ) and then the cost of a battery can be astronomical. If you do a search on auto expert.com.au John Cadogan reports on a Nissan customer who was quoted 33k for a new battery on a 5 year old Leaf.
3. I believe they are false economy in terms of green initiatives in that they are new cars, so more resources have to be used to manufacture them. You may be better off keeping your old car and maintaining it as long as possible thereby saving resources. The other thing is that when you charge it, the electricity has to come from somewhere.
Currently if I was going electric I would look at the Hyundai Ioniq series. These cars are more likely to work as intended.
Owning a EV's requires quite a change in your own behaviour and lifestyle. You might need to install solar panels at home and buy a fast charging device so that's a cost and if the sun ain't shining well you will have to get it from the grid. Also you need to be aware of how your distance capability can vary according to the road topography. Drive through the hills and all of a sudden the range will drop dramatically.
If you wanted something more efficient it's hard to go past the humble Toyota Corolla and for fun a Toyota 86/Subaru BRZ.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
I just choose not to be a hypocrite and also am a realist. I realise that my standards for what is acceptable is vastly different than that of people in other positions, and while one might say that those that are in a better position should lead the way, I say to them let those in the best position do that. I refuse to take the brunt of politics that won't even touch the people with the greatest impact just to have a position. Obviously, I can afford that, as nothing of what you say will have a serious impact on my personal life, so I am not going to pretend otherwise.

If we look at the matter on a large scale, the Western world has absolutely no right to pretend that they are doing "the right thing" as we are responsible for a consumerism on a scale not seen before in the history of humanity, and as much as we want to talk about our "principled" position we live in an excess that is not in accordance with that philosophy of caring about the environment. I would like to say that I do my share of environmental protection, by choosing to have various things that are sustainable and employ skilled labor rather than machines, and I choose to not fly as much as possible, I recycle heavily, and all my homes are equipped with solar and heat pumps, but that is as much as I am willing to do. Philosophical approach towards protecting the environment, when I play a sport with synthetic shoes, graphite and composite racquets, plastic racquet bags and apparel, courts made of asphalt and industrially produced surfaces etc is hypocricy. It is 100% harmful to the environment in its pointless purpose (enjoyment).

You are doing the best you can and the elites are trying to force everyone to change the way we live.
Human impact on the environment in terms of Co2 is just one small part of the equation. Far more influential is the solar flares coming off the sun and the formation of clouds.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
Hyundai and Kia are on the rise as well. The Genenis luxury range is good value at the moment and hope Kia go ahead and make the stinger coupe.
 

Born_to_slice

Hall of Fame
It's the best car that the commys could make for Eastern Europe apart from the Lada Samara abomination.
Trabant was actually the worst car they (we commies) made. It had fuel tank above the carburetor so it often went up in flames after collisions. Body was made out of fiberglass and lint so that was like driving a cake. It was kind of cute though, like a cartoon car. Some models of Samara looked ok, some were horrible. Their best car was Niva, legendary off road-er.
Some far better communist cars than Trabant:
Gaz-21 Volga (SSSR)


Dacia 1300 (Romania)


Skoda Octavia (Czechoslovakia)


Zil-117 (SSSR)



Tatra 603 (Czechoslovakia)



Chaika Gaz-13 (SSSR)



MZMA Moskvitch 407 (SSSR)



FSO Syrena (Poland)

 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
The problem with many EV cars is:
1. They are expensive to buy in many countries.
2. The batteries can lose their holding charge ( just like an iPhone ) and then the cost of a battery can be astronomical. If you do a search on auto expert.com.au John Cadogan reports on a Nissan customer who was quoted 33k for a new battery on a 5 year old Leaf.
3. I believe they are false economy in terms of green initiatives in that they are new cars, so more resources have to be used to manufacture them. You may be better off keeping your old car and maintaining it as long as possible thereby saving resources. The other thing is that when you charge it, the electricity has to come from somewhere.
Currently if I was going electric I would look at the Hyundai Ioniq series. These cars are more likely to work as intended.
Owning a EV's requires quite a change in your own behaviour and lifestyle. You might need to install solar panels at home and buy a fast charging device so that's a cost and if the sun ain't shining well you will have to get it from the grid. Also you need to be aware of how your distance capability can vary according to the road topography. Drive through the hills and all of a sudden the range will drop dramatically.
If you wanted something more efficient it's hard to go past the humble Toyota Corolla and for fun a Toyota 86/Subaru BRZ.
That’s what I have found in researching EVs.

One other major issue is that range drops about 25% in cold weather. That’s true of ICE vehicles as well but ICE vehicles start out with much more range and it’seasy to refill.
 

BlueB

Legend
That thing is ugly as a sin but not as ugly as a Trabant (I just looked it up.)
Actually nothing wrong with Trabant's styling - kind of like MG!
Look at this cutie:

It would be a great candidate for DIY conversion to an electric toy car, simple, small, light.

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
Trabant was actually the worst car they (we commies) made. It had fuel tank above the carburetor so it often went up in flames after collisions. Body was made out of fiberglass and lint so that was like driving a cake. It was kind of cute though, like a cartoon car. Some models of Samara looked ok, some were horrible. Their best car was Niva, legendary off road-er.
Some far better communist cars than Trabant:
Gaz-21 Volga (SSSR)


Dacia 1300 (Romania)


Skoda Octavia (Czechoslovakia)


Zil-117 (SSSR)



Tatra 603 (Czechoslovakia)



Chaika Gaz-13 (SSSR)



MZMA Moskvitch 407 (SSSR)



FSO Syrena (Poland)

Interesting cars there.
 

Genious at Work

Hall of Fame
Actually nothing wrong with Trabant's styling - kind of like MG!
Look at this cutie:

It would be a great candidate for DIY conversion to an electric toy car, simple, small, light.

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
A car can look very different depending on the angle and the accessories, but in general the Trabant is butt ugly. You have to admit it.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
You are the complete opposite of a realist. Doing all these individual things is very responsible, but it doesn't shift the dial. For that only massive political action will do.
Yes, that's esactly what they really want, " Massive political action". In the 1930's Hitler talked about this in that he wanted to change people's lifestyle with his dream of wind power, so climate change theory has been used even back then.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
for me?




not the fastest car but this actually could be one of the best "cruisers" on the world ATM for this price.

I just bought a 2017 version - used with 40.000km
im not kidding but this is for me currently the hottest car on the planet if we look at the exteriors.

I was always a big fan of Subaru Impreza WRX and this was modeled after it and Legacy Station Wagon.

I hope everything will be ok, the car is comming from Germany.
Yes Subaru are doing well their AWD technology, very popular here in Aus.
 

BlueB

Legend
A car can look very different depending on the angle and the accessories, but in general the Trabant is butt ugly. You have to admit it.
Why is it uglier then any of these?




All from a similar era, with similar design features...

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Rightwing Poles have raised the old canard that wind turbines and, hence, wind energy, is the detestable spoor of N... racial ideology. Nothing could be further from the truth

Craig Morris brought to my attention a recent front page of a Polish tabloid associating a phalanx of wind turbines with Adolf Hitler.

As with any effective propaganda, there must be a kernel of truth that can be twisted to serve the propagandist’s objective. So it is with wind energy and the Third Reich.

I first wrote about this subject in my 1995 book Wind Energy Comes of Age. I expanded on the theme with more up-to-date information in my current book Wind Energy for the Rest of Us.

Contrary to popular myth, it was not Ulrich Hütter that gave us modern wind turbines. That honor goes to a Dane, Johannes Juul, and to Danes who drove the modern wind turbine revival.

Hütter, an early N... Party member, worked for Ventimotor in Weimar developing wind turbines. Buchenwald, one of N... Germany’s notorious concentration camps, was just outside Weimar.

Ventimotor’s principals were senior members of the Reich. As I note in my new book, “By the end of the war there were six turbines at Ventimotor’s test field. All were forgettable. Even Hütter’s 5.7-meter (19-foot) diameter prototype was unremarkable and a throwback to much earlier machines that used a pilot vane to furl the rotor in high winds. . . None of the wind turbines [Hütter developed] left much of a legacy, but the work on them did.”

. . . “Instead, Hütter’s legacy is his aesthetic sense that wind turbines must be pleasing to the eye. It is also his insistence on wind turbines designed for low specific power that can be used in areas of low to moderate winds—where most of the world’s people live. It is also his contribution to making blades from composite materials and for a practical and durable method of attaching them to the rotor hub: the Hütter flange.

As I say in a recent article (Buchenwald’s Liberation and What It Says about the Development of Wind Energy) and in my new book, the one contribution that Hütter did make to wind turbine technology was how the blades attach to the rotor’s hub. Ironically, it was Danish grassroots citizen activists—the antithesis of fascist technocrats—that adapted Hütter’s concept to make wind turbines work—for everyone.

No, it wasn’t N...’s that developed wind energy. They tried and they failed.

Rather than a tool for oppression and enslavement, wind energy was developed by Danish farmers and dreamers to liberate the people from the tyranny of fossil fuels and nuclear power. And they succeeded.



Yes, that's esactly what they really want, " Massive political action". In the 1930's Hitler talked about this in that he wanted to change people's lifestyle with his dream of wind power, so climate change theory has been used even back then.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
In the 1890s, Poul la Cour and the Askov Folk High School focused more on material reality in teaching and in daily life. Poul once again took up inventing. Since wind was plentiful in Denmark, Poul felt that wind should be harnessed to produce electricity in Denmark. Holland had investigated using windmills to generate electricity, but rejected the idea because of their low efficiency and energy storing problems.

These drawbacks challenged the inventor and physicist in Poul and in 1891, he came up with the idea of using electrolysis and storing wind as hydrogen and oxygen energy. The Danish government supported him financially and the first experimental windmill was built at Askov in the summer of 1891. Poul solved the problem of producing a steady supply of power by inventing the Kratostate, a regulator that came to be widely used in electricity producing windmills in the Scandinavian countries and Germany.

Since Poul La Cour’s Askov windmill resembled a traditional Dutch windmill, many people criticized his work. The Danish government reduced its support in 1902, but by then, Poul had finished and published most of his experimental work. He transformed his windmill in Askov into a prototype electrical power plant and by 1895, the village of Askov was lighted by wind energy.

In 1897, Poul built a new and bigger experimental mill in the “Dutch” style just like the old one.
In 1903 Poul founded the Danish Wind Electricity Society and published a bimonthly journal about wind electricity. He also trained at least 20 electricians a year at Askov where they learned windmill theory, maintenance and development.

Poul’s Windmill Work Continues

Poul’s windmill work continued after his death in 1908 and by the 20th century about 35,000 wind engines were registered on Danish farms and about 2,000 grain mills. These mills shaped the Danish landscape and validated Poul's idea of small farms forming unique decentralized electrification in Denmark.

The Askov mill worked until 1968 when the Danish farmers stopped maintaining the iron constructions of the windmills and pulled many of them down. Over the next 50 years windmill use dwindled to small scale, local operations. Contradicting Poul la Cour’s philosophy, large coal burning electrical plants multiplied and converting to alternating current stopped the spread of windmill power across Denmark.

Then in the late 20th century, a new windmill generation constructed of improved materials and built on enhanced aerodynamic principles, sprang up across Denmark and the world. The wind again has been harnessed as a renewable resource, and Poul la Cour’s inventions and ideas are as fresh as a gust of strong wind.

Poul la Cour firmly believed that windmills on Danish farms not only would harness the wind to produce electric power, but they served an important social purpose as well. He didn’t want giant business corporations to monopolize the production of power. He felt that small local communities and individual farms could produce power more efficiently and cheaply. From the time he built his first experimental windmill at Askov in 1891 until his death in 1908, Poul la Cour worked to establish windmills as the focal means of harnessing wind to generate electricity in rural Denmark.
 

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
You are doing the best you can and the elites are trying to force everyone to change the way we live.
Human impact on the environment in terms of Co2 is just one small part of the equation. Far more influential is the solar flares coming off the sun and the formation of clouds.
You are making too much common sense, in an age when common sense is very uncommon...people today are gripped by irrational panic, and illogical solutions are being proposed and taking advantage of public fear.

Do I believe that climate change is caused by automobiles? No.

Insulation materials are thousands of times more problematic.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
The technology certainly needs development, and that's why the cars are not currently that numerous. But it's where the R&D dollars need to go!

The problem with many EV cars is:
1. They are expensive to buy in many countries.
2. The batteries can lose their holding charge ( just like an iPhone ) and then the cost of a battery can be astronomical. If you do a search on auto expert.com.au John Cadogan reports on a Nissan customer who was quoted 33k for a new battery on a 5 year old Leaf.
3. I believe they are false economy in terms of green initiatives in that they are new cars, so more resources have to be used to manufacture them. You may be better off keeping your old car and maintaining it as long as possible thereby saving resources. The other thing is that when you charge it, the electricity has to come from somewhere.
Currently if I was going electric I would look at the Hyundai Ioniq series. These cars are more likely to work as intended.
Owning a EV's requires quite a change in your own behaviour and lifestyle. You might need to install solar panels at home and buy a fast charging device so that's a cost and if the sun ain't shining well you will have to get it from the grid. Also you need to be aware of how your distance capability can vary according to the road topography. Drive through the hills and all of a sudden the range will drop dramatically.
If you wanted something more efficient it's hard to go past the humble Toyota Corolla and for fun a Toyota 86/Subaru BRZ.
 

Genious at Work

Hall of Fame
Why is it uglier then any of these?




All from a similar era, with similar design features...

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
The subtle differences in the proportions make it or break it. Just like moving someone's nose half inch up or down.
 

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
The technology certainly needs development, and that's why the cars are not currently that numerous. But it's where the R&D dollars need to go!
The R&D dollars need to go (and are going right now) to reduce emissions from conventional Internal Combustion cars to near zero....that will put an and to this nonsense.

The cheapest and most reliable cars are the ICR's.
 
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