Best ever TV drama.

Garhi Shot First

Hall of Fame
I tend to watch scifi/supernatural shows, so my choices are skewed in that direction.

Babylon 5 (Finally watching this one now. It's been on my shelf forever.)
Battlestar Galactica (reimagined)
Six Feet Under
Star Trek: TOS
Star Trek: DS9
Twilight Zone
The X-Files was very good for a very long time, until it wasn't anymore. Not sure how it stacks up against the other great scifi dramas.

I haven't seen most of the cop or political shows you all have mentioned, but you have me interested now. Seems like The Wire and WW are the places to start.
 
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Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
Well from an enjoyment perspective there should be no difference. However to compare Wolf Hall where the plot and tension were lifted from a book, to a pilot show of a suburban mafia goon and his shrink which later tuned into a six series 70 plus show masterpiece is a bit like comparing the English second division with the World Cup.

I don't care where the source material came from - I really couldn't care less.
If that infuences your rating or enjoyment or otherwise of a TV show then that's your issue - it's not mine.
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
I don't care where the source material came from - I really couldn't care less.
If that infuences your rating or enjoyment or otherwise of a TV show then that's your issue - it's not mine.

A slightly bizarre post and you have clearly taken some umbrage that I don't agree with your choice as Wolf Hall as one of the 'best' shows of all time.

You enjoyed it and so did I but I am surprised that a formulaic BBC costume drama adaptation is in the discussion for best of all time. It more surprising coming from you that 'enjoyment' is the benchmark as 'best' given the conderscending scorn you have heaped upon the most popular/enjoyed film franchise of all time.
 

Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
A slightly bizarre post and you have clearly taken some umbrage that I don't agree with your choice as Wolf Hall as one of the 'best' shows of all time.

You enjoyed it and so did I but I am surprised that a formulaic BBC costume drama adaptation is in the discussion for best of all time. It more surprising coming from you that 'enjoyment' is the benchmark as 'best' given the conderscending scorn you have heaped upon the most popular/enjoyed film franchise of all time.


I truly am not bothered about whether you agree with me or not.
That's especially so because of your apparent obsession about the source material, which I find irrelevant and quite puzzling.
To me it's the finished product that counts and the source material is just part of what makes a great TV show or series.
I would venture to suggest that would be the attitude of most people.
I used the word "rating" not just "enjoyment" - the word "rating" covers the myriad of qualities I rate - story, script, performances, scope, cinematography, direction, production values etc etc - the sum of all that provides the "enjoyment" - hopefully that's clear to you now.
As for your being surprised by Wolf Hall being in this discussion, well, I could say the same thing about some of your choices.
But I'm not bothered to do so.
 
N

Nathaniel_Near

Guest
Fair points. Let's get a long a bit better now though...

Bah, who am I to get in the way. Carry on.

Good discussion though.
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
I too tend to take the view that it doesn't matter much whether an original script is used or if it's an adaptation when judging the end-product.

Few downrate, say, Hitchcock's movies because of the fact that he adapted his movies from (usually less noteworthy) novels. The screen and the written page are such different mediums that starting with a good novel to adapt from doesn't make it much easier to make a good picture.
 
N

Nathaniel_Near

Guest
I'm only interested in how good something is. It's easier to only care about this if one is divorced of attachments, as they can create mental roadblocks.
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
I truly am not bothered about whether you agree with me or not.
That's especially so because of your apparent obsession about the source material, which I find irrelevant and quite puzzling.
To me it's the finished product that counts and the source material is just part of what makes a great TV show or series.
I would venture to suggest that would be the attitude of most people.
I used the word "rating" not just "enjoyment" - the word "rating" covers the myriad of qualities I rate - story, script, performances, scope, cinematography, direction, production values etc etc - the sum of all that provides the "enjoyment" - hopefully that's clear to you now.
As for your being surprised by Wolf Hall being in this discussion, well, I could say the same thing about some of your choices.
But I'm not bothered to do so.

Well I imagine what we find enjoyable is closer than you might care to admit. Wolf Hall is similar in direction, cinematography, production values etc to many other BBC costume dramas. Personally I find the the story more beguiling in Wolf Hall than some of the other well known BBC productions and that added to the drama and my enjoyment. My one criticism is that Ann Boelyn was overplayed/scripted. However a large part of its success can be attributed to the book behind it. That should not take away from your enjoyment but it makes it a less impressive TV product from the shows which morphed from a pilot into a multi year/series franchise.

I suppose I prize originality and repeatability. Six Feed Under had all the right ingredients in the first few seasons but by the end had turned in to a rather tortured study of mental illness. I felt it lost its freshness and became stale. Lost was also a fun and original series and who can forget the intriguing character of Locke. By the end though the writers had gotten themselves into such a 'hole' with all the implausible deus ex machina's that half way through the entire thing you wondered what on earth you were watching. Prison Break, 24 and Shameless all fall in to this category of great shows that became tired.

The truly greats shows separate themselves from the others by being original, enduring and most importantly maintaining their uniqueness throughout their production life. The Nordic Noir deserve a mention as they were able to this, despite maybe not being as sophisticated as some of the US shows. More impressive still is that they were produced on a small budget, with unknown actors and yet audiences outside their home countries were still able to find them captivating despite the language barrier. Yes, I would rate such shows above one off adaptations.
 

richardc-s

Semi-Pro
For me the best is/was Spartacus, I just love it!

I watched Breaking Bad but I really wasn't a huge fan... Giving the hype it's got I watched all 5 seasons but in all honesty I wish I didn't bother.
 
Many good series throughout the years. I'd say Breaking Bad takes the cake for serialized drama.

The original Twilight Zone series (non-serialized, independent stories) set a standard and is still today a great show to watch for me, though. I suppose most of its episodes can be considered drama.
 

Vcore89

Talk Tennis Guru
Many good series throughout the years. I'd say Breaking Bad takes the cake for serialized drama.

The original Twilight Zone series (non-serialized, independent stories) set a standard and is still today a great show to watch for me, though. I suppose most of its episodes can be considered drama.

BB is good but not quite there to be put over the top, just my opinion. I [usually don't] recommend--if you have the time--watching Spotless [2015], about a Crime Scene Cleaner, Jean Bastiere, whose past made his present profession...with the sudden appearance of his brother Martin putting his life all of a sudden in topsy-turvy!
 
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Carsomyr

Legend
Well I imagine what we find enjoyable is closer than you might care to admit. Wolf Hall is similar in direction, cinematography, production values etc to many other BBC costume dramas. Personally I find the the story more beguiling in Wolf Hall than some of the other well known BBC productions and that added to the drama and my enjoyment. My one criticism is that Ann Boelyn was overplayed/scripted. However a large part of its success can be attributed to the book behind it. That should not take away from your enjoyment but it makes it a less impressive TV product from the shows which morphed from a pilot into a multi year/series franchise.
I don't know, I feel that docking points from any sort of production because it has source material is a bit unfair; there's a reason why Best Original Screenplay or equivalent awards exist, and that's to reward those few that weren't adapted from something else - not to punish those that were. It's true that OS are more common in television than cinema, but I guess whether something's adapted or not doesn't rank highly on my personal criteria: any show or movie can be said to be an original work, because the degrees that they can vary from the source material can be quite large. It's up to completely different people than the author(s) of the original work.

I haven't read Mantel's books, so I can't compare. I was mostly interested in Wolf Hall because I liked A Man for All Seasons so much. But from what I gather from reviewers of her books, she goes quite out of her way to frame Cromwell as good and More as evil. But that's not what I got out of their arc in the show; I feel both were portrayed as equally brilliant, flawed men on opposite halves of an apple of discord, with perhaps Cromwell being a tad more sympathetic. I found myself respecting both, which was not the case that A Man for All Seasons was trying to make.
 

acura9927

Semi-Pro
Season 1 of American Horror Story
Season 5 of 24
Breaking Bad Season 4 and the Last season
Wayward Pines
Millionaire Matchmaker- I miss you Patty
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
For me the best is/was Spartacus, I just love it!

I watched Breaking Bad but I really wasn't a huge fan... Giving the hype it's got I watched all 5 seasons but in all honesty I wish I didn't bother.
@richardc-s shows us the way.

normal_69e1af279d29b8edabc0efed653cf99a.jpg
 

Dilettante

Hall of Fame
From recent years (15-20)

From US: "The Wire". Honorable mention: 2 first seasons of "The Sopranos". And some stuff from "Oz". Currently, "Fargo" is the best American drama.
From UK: "Broadchurch", "Happy Valley" and "Wolf Hall" which was totally astonishing.
Danish "Forbrydelsen" (although 2nd season was a little mistep).
French "Les Revenants"

I'm sure I'm forgotting others.

"Breaking Bad" was very good but the hype around it became unreasonable. It had some flaws. And, am I the only one that didn't like the ending?

Well I imagine what we find enjoyable is closer than you might care to admit. Wolf Hall is similar in direction, cinematography, production values etc to many other BBC costume dramas. Personally I find the the story more beguiling in Wolf Hall than some of the other well known BBC productions and that added to the drama and my enjoyment. My one criticism is that Ann Boelyn was overplayed/scripted. However a large part of its success can be attributed to the book behind it. That should not take away from your enjoyment but it makes it a less impressive TV product from the shows which morphed from a pilot into a multi year/series franchise.

I disagree with some points. I thought Anne Boleyn was a brilliant character, much better than other versions in TV or cinema ("Tudors" Boleyn and Natalie Portman's stupid version). Actress Claire Foy was not only beautiful, she made a hell of an interpretation.

Also, "Wolf Hall" the TV show it's impressive by its own merits. Of course the book has lots of merit. But no matter how good the book was, it's difficult to make such a good adaptation. The style, the ambience, the cast, the dialogue selection, everything was near perfection. Adapting a book is much harder than simply scan its pages. It takes a lot of creativity. And there were things that the TV Show made brilliantly that didn't come from the book. Mark Rylance, for instance. He just gave an incredible dimension to Cromwell's character. Put another actor in the role, anyone, and the show'd be still good, but not AS good. You didn't have Rylance in the books.

I didn't know who Rylance was and after the first episode I thought "who is this guy and how it's possible he isn't more famous than Matthew Cryalotraspingvoiceanegh"
 

Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
Well I imagine what we find enjoyable is closer than you might care to admit. Wolf Hall is similar in direction, cinematography, production values etc to many other BBC costume dramas. Personally I find the the story more beguiling in Wolf Hall than some of the other well known BBC productions and that added to the drama and my enjoyment. My one criticism is that Ann Boelyn was overplayed/scripted. However a large part of its success can be attributed to the book behind it. That should not take away from your enjoyment but it makes it a less impressive TV product from the shows which morphed from a pilot into a multi year/series franchise.

I suppose I prize originality and repeatability. Six Feed Under had all the right ingredients in the first few seasons but by the end had turned in to a rather tortured study of mental illness. I felt it lost its freshness and became stale. Lost was also a fun and original series and who can forget the intriguing character of Locke. By the end though the writers had gotten themselves into such a 'hole' with all the implausible deus ex machina's that half way through the entire thing you wondered what on earth you were watching. Prison Break, 24 and Shameless all fall in to this category of great shows that became tired.

The truly greats shows separate themselves from the others by being original, enduring and most importantly maintaining their uniqueness throughout their production life. The Nordic Noir deserve a mention as they were able to this, despite maybe not being as sophisticated as some of the US shows. More impressive still is that they were produced on a small budget, with unknown actors and yet audiences outside their home countries were still able to find them captivating despite the language barrier. Yes, I would rate such shows above one off adaptations.

Indeed, I have seen your list and there's much we agree on and a few we don't.
But again, that wasn't the issue for me - it's your view on the source material that I found worth commenting on - that's all.
I thought the depiction of Anne Boleyn was a highlight of Wolf Hall.
She was a fascinating character - much more complex than what we've seen before - a force of nature in her own right.
Her relationship with Cromwell was wonderfully portrayed with not a hint of black or white - the execution scene was a microcosm of their relationship in many ways.
Rylance was a revelation - it's one of the great performances in my opinion, which lifts the show into the very top tier.
The other factor that earned it such a high rating from me is this: There's nothing I'd change. It's rare for me to be able to say that.

I see you nominated Boardwalk Empire.
I thought it was very good but ultimately I came away disappointed.
It could have been better - it had all the elements of greatness but somehow, for me, the various parts didn't add up to what they'd promised to do.
 
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Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
From recent years (15-20)

From US: "The Wire". Honorable mention: 2 first seasons of "The Sopranos". And some stuff from "Oz". Currently, "Fargo" is the best American drama.
From UK: "Broadchurch", "Happy Valley" and "Wolf Hall" which was totally astonishing.
Danish "Forbrydelsen" (although 2nd season was a little mistep).
French "Les Revenants"

I'm sure I'm forgotting others.

"Breaking Bad" was very good but the hype around it became unreasonable. It had some flaws. And, am I the only one that didn't like the ending?



I disagree with some points. I thought Anne Boleyn was a brilliant character, much better than other versions in TV or cinema ("Tudors" Boleyn and Natalie Portman's stupid version). Actress Claire Foy was not only beautiful, she made a hell of an interpretation.

Also, "Wolf Hall" the TV show it's impressive by its own merits. Of course the book has lots of merit. But no matter how good the book was, it's difficult to make such a good adaptation. The style, the ambience, the cast, the dialogue selection, everything was near perfection. Adapting a book is much harder than simply scan its pages. It takes a lot of creativity. And there were things that the TV Show made brilliantly that didn't come from the book. Mark Rylance, for instance. He just gave an incredible dimension to Cromwell's character. Put another actor in the role, anyone, and the show'd be still good, but not AS good. You didn't have Rylance in the books.

I didn't know who Rylance was and after the first episode I thought "who is this guy and how it's possible he isn't more famous than Matthew Cryalotraspingvoiceanegh"

Apologies for some repitition in my response from the previous post:

I couldn't agree with you more on Boleyn - She was a highlight of Wolf Hall.
She was a fascinating character - much more complex than what we've seen before - a force of nature in her own right.
Her relationship with Cromwell was wonderfully portrayed with not a hint of black or white - the execution scene was a microcosm of their relationship in many ways - and what a scene that was.
Rylance was a revelation - it's one of the great performances in my opinion, which lifts the show into the very top tier.
His scenes with Thomas More were superb - two adversaries who deeply respected each other, searching for advantage in a deadly game with Cromwell desperately searching for a way to save him and yet carry out Henry's wishes - a wonderful conflict of emotions.
And Damien Lewis deserves much praise for his Henry - at times terrifying (such as the superb ending) and at others like a lost little boy.
The other factor that earned it such a high rating from me is this: There's nothing I'd change. It's rare for me to be able to say that.
You describe Wolf Hall as "astonishing". If not quite that for me it's not far off.
It's certainly an extraordinary example of how great TV can be, especially compared with what passes for much of the film industry these days.
 
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D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
Indeed, I have seen your list and there's much we agree on and a few we don't.
But again, that wasn't the issue for me - it's your view on the source material that I found worth commenting on - that's all.
I thought the depiction of Anne Boleyn was a highlight of Wolf Hall.
She was a fascinating character - much more complex than what we've seen before - a force of nature in her own right.
Her relationship with Cromwell was wonderfully portrayed with not a hint of black or white - the execution scene was a microcosm of their relationship in many ways.
Rylance was a revelation - it's one of the great performances in my opinion, which lifts the show into the very top tier.
The other factor that earned it such a high rating from me is this: There's nothing I'd change. It's rare for me to be able to say that.

I see you nominated Boardwalk Empire.
I thought it was very good but ultimately I came away disappointed.
It could have been better - it had all the elements of greatness but somehow, for me, the various parts didn't add up to what they'd promised to do.
I don't know, I feel that docking points from any sort of production because it has source material is a bit unfair; there's a reason why Best Original Screenplay or equivalent awards exist, and that's to reward those few that weren't adapted from something else - not to punish those that were. It's true that OS are more common in television than cinema, but I guess whether something's adapted or not doesn't rank highly on my personal criteria: any show or movie can be said to be an original work, because the degrees that they can vary from the source material can be quite large. It's up to completely different people than the author(s) of the original work.

I haven't read Mantel's books, so I can't compare. I was mostly interested in Wolf Hall because I liked A Man for All Seasons so much. But from what I gather from reviewers of her books, she goes quite out of her way to frame Cromwell as good and More as evil. But that's not what I got out of their arc in the show; I feel both were portrayed as equally brilliant, flawed men on opposite halves of an apple of discord, with perhaps Cromwell being a tad more sympathetic. I found myself respecting both, which was not the case that A Man for All Seasons was trying to make.

From recent years (15-20)

From US: "The Wire". Honorable mention: 2 first seasons of "The Sopranos". And some stuff from "Oz". Currently, "Fargo" is the best American drama.
From UK: "Broadchurch", "Happy Valley" and "Wolf Hall" which was totally astonishing.
Danish "Forbrydelsen" (although 2nd season was a little mistep).
French "Les Revenants"

I'm sure I'm forgotting others.

"Breaking Bad" was very good but the hype around it became unreasonable. It had some flaws. And, am I the only one that didn't like the ending?



I disagree with some points. I thought Anne Boleyn was a brilliant character, much better than other versions in TV or cinema ("Tudors" Boleyn and Natalie Portman's stupid version). Actress Claire Foy was not only beautiful, she made a hell of an interpretation.

Also, "Wolf Hall" the TV show it's impressive by its own merits. Of course the book has lots of merit. But no matter how good the book was, it's difficult to make such a good adaptation. The style, the ambience, the cast, the dialogue selection, everything was near perfection. Adapting a book is much harder than simply scan its pages. It takes a lot of creativity. And there were things that the TV Show made brilliantly that didn't come from the book. Mark Rylance, for instance. He just gave an incredible dimension to Cromwell's character. Put another actor in the role, anyone, and the show'd be still good, but not AS good. You didn't have Rylance in the books.

I didn't know who Rylance was and after the first episode I thought "who is this guy and how it's possible he isn't more famous than Matthew Cryalotraspingvoiceanegh"

Well it was some time ago that I read Mantel's book and I what I remember now was the mood, the sense of foreboding and inevitability of the wheel of fate alongside Cromwell's sense of duty and purpose for the task at hand. Specifically my criticism of Boelyn stems from when watching the series finding myself saying would Boelyn really have shown such caprice, would she really have said such and such...? We'll never now and regardless it did make good drama. I thought the last scene with Henry and Cromwell was very menacing indeed. Good for Rylance that his success has opened up other doors for him quite late in his career. He was always a very admired Shakespearean actor. He gives a great performance in the recent Bridge of Spies movie.

@Dilettante hailing from Spain have you seen Isobel? If so, a penny for your thoughts please.

@Paul Murphy please elaborate on your thoughts on Boardwalk Empire.
 
BB is good but not quite there to be put over the top, just my opinion. I [usually don't] recommend--if you have the time--watching Spotless [2015], about a Crime Scene Cleaner, Jean Bastiere, whose past made his present profession...with the sudden appearance of his brother Martin putting his life all of a sudden in topsy-turvy!
Spotless sounds like a great concept, actually. Thank you, Vcore89. I'll try to catch this soon.
 

La Grande

G.O.A.T.
Untouchable: Mad Men, Breaking Bad, Fargo, Game of Thrones, True Detective, Dexter (Season 1-4), Family Guy

Great: Sherlock, Luther, The Affair, Twin Peaks, Homeland

Watch list: The Sopranos, The Wire, Deadwood, Six Feet Under and The Walking Dead.
 
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richardc-s

Semi-Pro
Untouchable: Mad Men, Breaking Bad, Fargo, Game of Thrones, True Detective, Dexter (Season 1-4), Family Guy

Great: Sherlock, Luther, Twin Peaks, Homeland

Watch list: The Sopranos, The Wire, Deadwood, Six Feet Under and The Walking Dead.

Oh yea I forgot about Sherlock! Did you watch the new episode that aired a few days ago?
 

La Grande

G.O.A.T.
Oh yea I forgot about Sherlock! Did you watch the new episode that aired a few days ago?

Yup, watched it last night with my mum on iPlayer. Haha, the chemistry is still OFF THE CHARTS.. it's not season 1 or 2 level, but season 3 level probably, still very good. While being excellent, it still suffers from the problem all tv shows seem to get after 2 or 3 seasons.. constant references to the past, the main storyline/case taking a backseat to exploring an aspect of a character. So in short, a good watch, but kinda messy.
 

DRII

G.O.A.T.
I tend to watch scifi/supernatural shows, so my choices are skewed in that direction.

Babylon 5
Battlestar Galactica (reimagined)
Six Feet Under
Star Trek: TOS
Star Trek: DS9
Twilight Zone
The X-Files was very good for a very long time, until it wasn't anymore. Not sure how it stacks up against the other great scifi dramas.

I haven't seen most of the cop or political shows you all have mentioned, but you have me interested now. Seems like The Wire and WW are the places to start.
absolutely! i forgot about X-Files, such a fantastic show for so many years....

some episodes were truly close to perfection.
 

Garhi Shot First

Hall of Fame
absolutely! i forgot about X-Files, such a fantastic show for so many years....

some episodes were truly close to perfection.
They were! And I don't know how much credit they get for doing comedy well, but I think they really hit some fantastic notes in their stand-alone episodes, either with straight-up comedy or blending comedic elements into a more serious episode. Humbug and Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose are two of my favorite episodes. Also enjoyable were War of the Coprophages, Bad Blood, and that one where Mulder ended up trying to make the perfect wish. Silly excellence. :D
 

Vcore89

Talk Tennis Guru
What made The X-Files great? The Smoking Man!;) No mention of Millennium (Lance Henriksen, Megan Gallagher, etc.)?

I watched Millennium first, it got cancelled after 3 seasons. An episode of Millennium crossovered to the X-Files, that was when I started watching the X-Files but never seen The X-Files Seasons 1-6.
 

Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
Well it was some time ago that I read Mantel's book and I what I remember now was the mood, the sense of foreboding and inevitability of the wheel of fate alongside Cromwell's sense of duty and purpose for the task at hand. Specifically my criticism of Boelyn stems from when watching the series finding myself saying would Boelyn really have shown such caprice, would she really have said such and such...? We'll never now and regardless it did make good drama. I thought the last scene with Henry and Cromwell was very menacing indeed. Good for Rylance that his success has opened up other doors for him quite late in his career. He was always a very admired Shakespearean actor. He gives a great performance in the recent Bridge of Spies movie.

@Dilettante hailing from Spain have you seen Isobel? If so, a penny for your thoughts please.

@Paul Murphy please elaborate on your thoughts on Boardwalk Empire.

It's hard to put my finger on what made it a lesser show in my view.
I certainly wouldn't suggest it was let down by the performances - they were uniformly very good/excellent - nor was it let down by the look of it or the care that was clearly put into it.
I would point to one event though of significance that caused it to lose steam - the loss of Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt).
I understand he was difficult to deal with and that he may well have been written out of the series for that reason.
No matter what the reason for his demise it certainly caused the show to change direction and not for the better.
I also felt the reappearance of Kelly Macdonald late in the run seemed more about giving her something to do - it seemed to slow the main narrative with no discernable benefit.
There's also this.
It's a quote from an article entitled: "How we'd fix it: Boardwalk Empire."
It says: "It doesn’t move the needle in a national-conversation sense the way Breaking Bad did, the way Mad Men or Game of Thrones do."
In and of itself that's not important to me but what it hints at is that it simply didn't generate the enthusiasm and following that shows that are mentioned in the "great" category are expected to.
I used to look forward to watching BE - but not with anywhere near the same degree of anticipation of BB or Wolf Hall or The Shield or Mad Men.
Finally, as I've said of Wolf Hall, there's is nothing I'd change - not so with Boardwalk Empire.
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
It's hard to put my finger on what made it a lesser show in my view.
I certainly wouldn't suggest it was let down by the performances - they were uniformly very good/excellent - nor was it let down by the look of it or the care that was clearly put into it.
I would point to one event though of significance that caused it to lose steam - the loss of Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt).
I understand he was difficult to deal with and that he may well have been written out of the series for that reason.
No matter what the reason for his demise it certainly caused the show to change direction and not for the better.
I also felt the reappearance of Kelly Macdonald late in the run seemed more about giving her something to do - it seemed to slow the main narrative with no discernable benefit.
There's also this.
It's a quote from an article entitled: "How we'd fix it: Boardwalk Empire."
It says: "It doesn’t move the needle in a national-conversation sense the way Breaking Bad did, the way Mad Men or Game of Thrones do."
In and of itself that's not important to me but what it hints at is that it simply didn't generate the enthusiasm and following that shows that are mentioned in the "great" category are expected to.
I used to look forward to watching BE - but not with anywhere near the same degree of anticipation of BB or Wolf Hall or The Shield or Mad Men.
Finally, as I've said of Wolf Hall, there's is nothing I'd change - not so with Boardwalk Empire.

Thanks for the reply and an interesting post. As I was saying earlier it is a real challenge to keep a show 'super on the pulse' for 5 seasons and very few shows have ever managed to do that.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Well, then I'm looking forward to T-bag and his learned words of wisdom.

tumblr_nzuazbFuzQ1r8vzdno2_250.gif


We must better ourselves to escape from the captivity of negativity.

Mahone must come back, Kellerman too. haha senator Kellerman, after all those murders and being part of a conspiracy, let us just make him Senator/Governor or whatever he ended up as. Have to go back and watch.
 

Paul Murphy

Hall of Fame
Thanks for the reply and an interesting post. As I was saying earlier it is a real challenge to keep a show 'super on the pulse' for 5 seasons and very few shows have ever managed to do that.

My pleasure.
And I agree.
Wolf Hall does have an advantage in that - as does Band of Brothers - but I suppose they must firstly be rated on their quality rather than longevity.
Longevity and quality - well, that's a supreme achievement.
 

comeback

Hall of Fame
i agree with all shows mentioned..I thought Homeland was really good and Tyrant on FX also..Orange is the New Black is decent.
The Blacklist and Game of Thrones were highly rated but i couldn't get into them
 
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D

Deleted member 688153

Guest
Gonna level with you guys - I haven't seen The Sopranos.

Am I missing out?
 
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