Best way for starting the mains

#1
Hey guys,which of the following would you consider the best method for starting mains?
1)Yusuki method
2)Parnell method(i know that he does not own this technique but i cannot find another term/as it is shown in his 16 min video,it refers to backing up a fixed clamp with a starting clamp inside the frame)
3)Irvin method(placing a starting clamp outside the frame and tensioning the other main-it does not involve pulling two strings silmutaneously).
 
#2
This is a good question and one I have been thinking about too in that I want to attempt to treat these strings (all strings for that mater) equally in approach.

I personally use Yusuki and usually string 2 piece but wonder if this is the best way to start the mains.
 
#5
I no longer use a starting clamp outside the frame. I use the starting clamp on the second main inside the frame while tensioning the first. I pull every main once and never get more than one main ahead on either side. Also the two machine clamp are never side by side where they block each other from getting close to the frame.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
#6
I no longer use a starting clamp outside the frame. I use the starting clamp on the second main inside the frame while tensioning the first. I pull every main once and never get more than one main ahead on either side. Also the two machine clamp are never side by side where they block each other from getting close to the frame.
Have a video with these changes?
 
#8
I no longer use a starting clamp outside the frame. I use the starting clamp on the second main inside the frame while tensioning the first. I pull every main once and never get more than one main ahead on either side. Also the two machine clamp are never side by side where they block each other from getting close to the frame.
Is there a reason for using the starting clamp instead of the machine clamp?Or,why don't you back up an anchor fixed clamp with your starting clamp like parnell?
 
#9
Is there a reason for using the starting clamp instead of the machine clamp?Or,why don't you back up an anchor fixed clamp with your starting clamp like parnell?
Seems that the method he uses make sure there is as much clearance for his clamps to get as close to the frame as possible. Using the piggy back method could obstruct the second clamp when the both strings are tension on both sides.
I seen Ron from P1 do a similar technique clamping on the second main but not have the fancy Irvin Block.

I have heard and seen many advanced senior stringers that are very focused on those center mains and the least amount of drawback and max clearance seems to be the main focus with their techniques.

Many ways to get the job done however in situations stringing for a tournament or if there are multiple stringers on site they will tell you how they want you to start your mains, what the pre stretch %, what type of knot to use, etc...
I think that's why it is important to learn the many different ways because you never know when you're going to have to be comfortable doing it.
 
#10
Is there a reason for using the starting clamp instead of the machine clamp?Or,why don't you back up an anchor fixed clamp with your starting clamp like parnell?
If I use a starting clamp (and a cloths ping between the clamp and the frame I never have two machine clamps bumping up against each other. If you stringing an 18 main mid racket with only one string separating the two clamps on one end then you will need to stagger the clamps (so they’re not equidistance from the frame) or have have one or more strings bent out of tensioned alignment.
 
#14
Hey guys,which of the following would you consider the best method for starting mains?
1)Yusuki method
2)Parnell method(i know that he does not own this technique but i cannot find another term/as it is shown in his 16 min video,it refers to backing up a fixed clamp with a starting clamp inside the frame)
3)Irvin method(placing a starting clamp outside the frame and tensioning the other main-it does not involve pulling two strings silmutaneously).
Hmm, in all the years I've never thought about what the method I use to start the mains is called. My standard way has just been to start the mains pulling the first 4, then using two clamps to hold it and then I go one by one after that, but making sure I don't get more than 2 ahead on each side. So in a 16 by 19 pattern racket, I'd do the first two mains on each side, then do two more on say the right side, then go 4 on the left, then 4 more on the right to finish and tie the knot. Then the last 2 on the left and finish/tie the knot.
 
#16
I am going to try the Clothes Pin / Starting Clamp inside the Racquet Method.

My stringing machine is in the laundry room after all so it is a natural next step!

I just better make sure I take it from one of my old sweat shirts hanging on the line and not my better half's silk this-or-that!
 
#17
I no longer use a starting clamp outside the frame. I use the starting clamp on the second main inside the frame while tensioning the first. I pull every main once and never get more than one main ahead on either side. Also the two machine clamp are never side by side where they block each other from getting close to the frame.
How would I do this with floating clamps?
 
#19
Hey guys,which of the following would you consider the best method for starting mains?
1)Yusuki method
2)Parnell method(i know that he does not own this technique but i cannot find another term/as it is shown in his 16 min video,it refers to backing up a fixed clamp with a starting clamp inside the frame)
3)Irvin method(placing a starting clamp outside the frame and tensioning the other main-it does not involve pulling two strings silmutaneously).
I use what essentially amounts to the parnell method you mentioned above. Sometimes I'll back it with a starting clamp but most of the time I just use the machine clamp. It's all personal preference.
 
#20
Don't, place one flying clamp in the center of the two center mains and tension a second then a third main using your other flying clamp to hold them. Then do the same on the opposite side using the clamp on the center strings.
Thanks Irvin.
I have a starting clamp and 2x floating clamps.
Is there a better method using the starting clamp?
 
#22
Don't, place one flying clamp in the center of the two center mains and tension a second then a third main using your other flying clamp to hold them. Then do the same on the opposite side using the clamp on the center strings.
Some people may thing that double pulling the center strings will give you a lower tension on those string and they are 100% correct. When I set reference at 60 lbs and pull the second main against a flying clamp on the 2 center mains I will have some tension loss at the first point where the string hits the frame so I might get 59 lbs on the second main. Then the string turns 180* to the first main and there’s more loss so I might get 56 lbs on the center main up to the clamp and half that 28 lbs on each center main below the clamp. But when I pull the other second main I get 59 lbs on the second main, 56 lbs on the other center main and another 28 lbs on each center main below the clamp.

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Measuring tension on main string immediately after tensioning I think is a bad process. String initially will loose tension very fast and the difference between 4 minutes and 5 minutes could make a difference is tension loss and your readings. Get a repeatable process down and perfect it, that the best way to achieve consistency.
 

Kevo

Hall of Fame
#23
I string mostly poly or syn gut, no soft mutis these days. For those types of string I don't find slipping on the first pull to be a problem at all. Can't remember the last time I had a string slip. So I don't bother with a starting clamp or anything special. I just put the machine clamp about one clamps length away from the frame on the main I'm not pulling and pull the other main. Then I string one more main on the same side. Then I go back and pull the originally clamped main and continue on. Simple and effective with no extra clamps required.

If I had to string a really soft multi that was prone to slipping I'd probably use the starting clamp with the Yusuki method. Having the string under tension when clamping helps to prevent the slipping in my experience.
 
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