Blunt syringe needles for stringing?

#1
I've read a couple of articles that discussed people using these for blocked grommets. I am finally ready to order some, but unsure what size to look for. Any recommendations? I would like 1 size that works for 16 - 17 gauge string.
 
#3
Strikes me as unnecessary but I just measured the diameter of Wilson Sensation 16 and it was .052", the item you are looking for can be found by searching the word "luer" on McMasterCarr. I would guess you will need a minimum of I.D .053".
 
#4
Believe I went with 14 and 15 gauge off the massive online retailer site starting with an A. Think those were the 2 largest options available. So far I like using them and and they work well. I usually put them in early in the process so I have a visual cue to my skip holes while stringing.
 
#5
Thanks for the measurement. Looks like most 14ga needles will work.

I agree it may be unnecessary, but will certainly make stringing much easier.

I'll give an example of when I will use these. On my Angell TC95 the last cross hole is blocked by two strings. In these case of this racquet these can be inserted into this hole then strung around and when the last cross is pulled through them, removed. Pushing a string through this space can a royal pia using an awl.
 
#9
Scrap piece of string sounds like a decent idea that I never thought of. I'll try both methods and let you know what works best for me.
 
#10
I've read a couple of articles that discussed people using these for blocked grommets. I am finally ready to order some, but unsure what size to look for. Any recommendations? I would like 1 size that works for 16 - 17 gauge string.
That's essentially what a pathfinder awl is. I would just order one rather than ordering needles.
 
#11
That's essentially what a pathfinder awl is. I would just order one rather than ordering needles.
You can get a box of syringe tips for a fraction of the price of a single pathfinder. It is the same idea, but way cheaper and less clunky to execute as I can put the syringe in ahead of time and just move on to other tasks until you need it.
 
#12
You can get a box of syringe tips for a fraction of the price of a single pathfinder. It is the same idea, but way cheaper and less clunky to execute as I can put the syringe in ahead of time and just move on to other tasks until you need it.
Interesting, I've never found the need for either but I guess it all depends on frame.
 
#13
14 gauge needle is needed for 16 gauge but won’t fit in many small grommets. The needle does not have to go in the grommet though. Just get the tip of the need started in the grommet and push it through with the string. The Gamma Pathfinder awl works best but it’s expensive compared to the needles. Don’t try to insert the pathfinder awl past a tensioned string though it will break.
 
#14
Interesting, I've never found the need for either but I guess it all depends on frame.
I string with Kevlar a lot and like to use a Yonex loop. Kevelar is super flexible the the pathfinder awl Ames it easy to get the string in the side of the string you want it on. On rackets where you have to get the Kevlar past a string going diagonally through a grommet for tying off the awl works great too. I’ve been using my awl for about 10 years and use it a lot. I also have all sizes of needles but prefer the awl by a long shot.
 
#15
I string with Kevlar a lot and like to use a Yonex loop. Kevelar is super flexible the the pathfinder awl Ames it easy to get the string in the side of the string you want it on. On rackets where you have to get the Kevlar past a string going diagonally through a grommet for tying off the awl works great too. I’ve been using my awl for about 10 years and use it a lot. I also have all sizes of needles but prefer the awl by a long shot.
Interesting, I've never used Kevlar. The only blocked holes I encounter on a regular basis right now is on one of my guys RFA's who uses a hybrid of HyperG and Vanquish. The vanquish is 15L so even with the blocked hole as long as I cut a sharp point it isn't an issue. I only own a pathfinder awl because it came in the tool kit of the Baiardo but I've never found a need for it.
 
#16
That's the problem that I have with these racquets. I have to pass through/by tensioned strings (because the mains are strung first and overlap cross holes at bottom of the racquet).
 
#17
I have a pathfinder awl in a box someplace that I didn't order but got anyway. Never could make any sense of it.
As far as stringing Kevlar goes, I stuck with Prince and Forten precisely because the Ashaway Kevlar is so mushy.
 
#19
By coincidence my 14 g and 15g blunt needles arrived today and I too have an angell tc95 with the blocked grommet on the last cross. I've not used them yet but Kirschbaum max power 1.20mm and Weiss cannon scorpion 1.22mm fit through the 15g one. The 14g is too big to fit 7B but I could replace the grommet with a wider fittex one if I need to get thicker strings through in the future.
 
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#20
That's the problem that I have with these racquets. I have to pass through/by tensioned strings (because the mains are strung first and overlap cross holes at bottom of the racquet).
First you put the needles in the grommets that will be blocked, then string the mains. When stringing the crosses the needles hold a path open to get the crosses through.
 

Dags

Professional
#21
It's the same racquet that caused me to buy blunt needles. I've never used them since, but they worked beautifully on it. I made a couple of posts about it in this thread:

https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/to-show-your-stringing-tool-kit.541198

For convenience, they key points I made are pasted below.


I've been using 15 gauge needles, but the key thing to check is what they list as the internal diameter. Mine are 1.36mm, which means 1.30 string fits in nicely. I had to enlarge my grommets just a tiny bit with an awl to get them in, but it's so slight that you'd need a very keen eye to spot. I did also get some 14 and 18 gauge - the vendor was selling in multiples of 20, so I figured I may as well get a mix - but have had no cause to use them yet. Just as important as diameter is length - the 1 inch tips are the ones to go for.


On my frame, I use five of them at the same time. It's a 16 x 19 with skips at 7 and 9, and I string it with an ATW pattern where I run the top cross with the short side. It means I block the bottom two crosses, plus 9H on the long side. The grommets don't have any of those handy guides on them to keep the string to one side, and having the needles there avoids any fiddling about. Very cheap, very easy to use, they certainly aren't a necessity, but don't have a downside that I can see. Maybe one day I'll nick a string, but they're really pretty blunt.
 
#22
Alternatives to using needles:
1. as mentioned by jim, a scrap piece of string under the offending loop that you can tug on to move the string away from the blocked hole.
2. a razor blade used to put a sharp diagonal point on the string.
3. enlarging the blocked hole with a waxed awl before you start stringing.
 
#23
Plan ahead and use the scrap string under the string blocking the opening, it works.
When you cut the tip end of string to sharp point, use a needle nose pliers and only push a very short amount of string through at a time, works most of the time.
It is important that you only push a short amount of string through the grommet at a time, as if you try and push a longer section of string it will bend.
Once in a great, great while, if that fails, I will use super glue on sharp pointed end and spray with super glue accelerator to immediately set the glue, end is now stiffer and that will go through.
For the most part, cutting to a sharp point and slow short increments to push through will work.
If all else fails and you want to use an awl, then make a plastic awl out of scrap poly string cut to a point lubed with chap stick, and try to follow with your string.
 
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Dags

Professional
#24
The most useful thing about the needles was when it came to the double-blocked hole. Because you're inserting them before you start, you can string the mains around them in the alignment of your choice. It means the string will always exit the grommet the side of the blocking string that you want it.

A good stringer should know several ways to mitigate a blocked hole, many of which are listed in this thread. The needles are an extremely effective way of planning ahead, particularly if you'll be stringing a 'problem' racquet on a regular basis.
 
#25
Place a scrap piece of string under the string blocking grommet, then when you get to the blocked hole, just take needle nose and lift up or push down on scrap string to open blocked hole.
Awls will just damage string. I never use awl for blocked holes.
This is what I do as well. Not the awl damaging the string part.
 
#28
I have three pathfinder awls. No problem using them even with blocked holes past tensioned strings. Just make sure to use Snot lube the help things along.

However, in many instances, the scrap string method works really well as long as the scrap sting is clean, pretty straight and the tips are trimmed to a sharp point.
 
#29
I don't know about you guys, but if I am settling into a long stringing session, I am going to have quite a few libations just to keep the process well lubricated and maintain proper equilibrium. My mental faculties certainly do not become more acute as I go along. So, for me, scrap string is SOP for both blocked holes and reminding me of skips. I am an old grey beard and have been stringing since Jesus was a boy -- scrap string is my equivalent of lane-assist.
 
#34
You’re just going to pull on it hard enough to nudge the string out of the way so you can get the string in and through the grommet. So long enough to hold on to.
LOL. I was half-kidding, I figured if we were going to wax about the type of string it should be, we'd probably need to talk about size as well. But I appreciate the sincere response.
 
#37
Thinner diameter string, as the scrap string slightly raises the string that blocks hole.
To be honest, I ran out of Badminton string about a year ago, and have since just use a 18g smooth poly string that I had that I knew I would never use, and that works fine for scrap string under blocking string, and is small diameter string, and the poly is strong enough not to break when you pull up or push down on it to open up grommet hole.
 
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#38
OK, so I gather you use the scrap string as a loop that is tugged on to move the tensioned string out of the way of the hole it is blocking.

I use the other method. I use a straight piece of scrap string as a guide for the string I want to thread. So for me, a thicker stiffer string is better.
 
#39
Rather than use as a guide , I place string under the string blocking hole (scrap string is between frame and string)
,now you can grab ends of scrap string and move the blocked string out of the way.
You can have the ability to do this until you pull the scrap string out, which I do after string job is done.
Placing it as a guide, you only have one shot at it once your guide string is out.
I typically use this on racquets that have chance of problem blocked holes only.
It works for me when needed, and there are other ways to manage blocked holes as well. This is one of my preferred ways to manage it when needed.
It even works on double blocked holes.Lifting the string up or down allows for placement below or above outside string as well, so no cross overs.

Majority of blocked holes works with just cutting to sharp point and slow pushing increments of string and it goes through.
Pre weave the top few cross strings before you tension end mains, and you just eliminated the top blocked holes.
 
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#40
I did use the loop method on a couple of occasions but found it difficult to pull the loop in order to open up a path for the string. I was using stiff poly scrap string so perhaps that was the problem. It's been a while since I tried that method but perhaps I will give it another crack.

I also tried pre-weaving the top few crosses but found it disrupted my stringing "rhythm". I just find it easier to finish off the Main strings first, get them out of the way, and then move onto the Crosses. I use the Stringway tool for crosses and find it easier to finish the Mains first.
 
#41
The only time I think you might need needles is when you are stringing something with CAP grommets. Blocked holes with those rackets can be a bear. What jime is trying to explain is the best way.
 
#42
when stringing CAPed frames preweave all crosses until you pass the outside main to bypass any blocked holes at the top.
 
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