Boris Becker confirms racquet weight for him and Sampras

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Boris Becker, during yesterday's BBC commentary on
Federer Bozoljac
mentioned the weight of his racquet: 380g
and of
Pete Sampras's: 389-395g (which I've supported all the time on this forum)
during their peak times.
 

VGP

Legend
I'm assuming he would know. He was a Bosworth client back then as was Sampras and Lendl.

In watching the TTC special 'Ivan Lendl - Return of a Champion' Lendl used to have Jay Bosworth hit with him using Becker and Sampras' rackets. He wanted to get a better idea of how the ball came off and sounded when those frames and setups were used to hit the ball...... competing against those guys using their frames was another matter.
 

Kemitak

Professional
And Boom-Boom thought that Muster's racquet was around 400 grams. That's unbelievable that he had those long rallies and matches with such a heavy racquet.

My PS88 is about 14 oz. and I can play maybe three or four days in a week with it, but then my arm needs a two week holiday.

Muster is a madman.
 

Rorsach

Hall of Fame
Becker's racquet weight isn't that surprising, his stick (Boris Becker Super, 50% Fiberglass, 50% graphite) weighs 377 grams clean, without any modifications.
 

yemenmocha

Professional
So you can't buy BB's racquet on TW any longer? I don't see the heavy one, the one that was allegedly the same specs as BB's frame.

TW lists one that is "BB's choice" but it is a light racquet.
 
J

Jchurch

Guest
Agreed if you can wield it there are a whole host of advantages. I find that I have to get my arm back into playing shape once I haven't been playing for a month or so to be able to use my K90 or BLX90.
 

Pneumated1

Hall of Fame
Listening to Becker and McEnroe, they both seem to match specific types of rackets to particular eras. Becker himself said yesterday that the former players, like himself, hit with heavy, flexible rackets. And McEnroe, a few days ago, was speaking of how the modern game almost demands the lighter, stiffer racket.

However, Becker and McEnroe (especially McEnroe) implied that they have not changed their playing styles or rackets to suit a more modern game. While many of us intermediate players make racket decisions based on the modern pro game, wouldn't we be better served to follow the lead of the former greats----with their heavy, flexible sticks and more relaxed strokes?

I'm 37 but often play with a really good former player and teaching pro in his mid-late 60's who almost left his arm detached on the court one day trying to emulate Nadal's forehand with a Pure Drive Cortex. I don't get it!
 

Keifers

Legend
Listening to Becker and McEnroe, they both seem to match specific types of rackets to particular eras. Becker himself said yesterday that the former players, like himself, hit with heavy, flexible rackets. And McEnroe, a few days ago, was speaking of how the modern game almost demands the lighter, stiffer racket.

However, Becker and McEnroe (especially McEnroe) implied that they have not changed their playing styles or rackets to suit a more modern game. While many of us intermediate players make racket decisions based on the modern pro game, wouldn't we be better served to follow the lead of the former greats----with their heavy, flexible sticks and more relaxed strokes?

I'm 37 but often play with a really good former player and teaching pro in his mid-late 60's who almost left his arm detached on the court one day trying to emulate Nadal's forehand with a Pure Drive Cortex. I don't get it!
I agree... big time.

The modern game is very much about racquet head speed, which means lighter weight sticks, which means increased stiffness to get the same power, which can and often does lead to more arm/elbow/shoulder problems.

Unless we've grown up hitting with the modern strokes, we are indeed often better served by heavy, flexible sticks that allow more relaxed grips and smooth strokes. And even with these older-style racquets, we can still hit some of the modern shots -- we'll get less spin and action on the ball than with modern sticks, to be sure, but we'll do it with much less violence to our arms/elbows/shoulders/bodies.

Painful to think about your buddy doing that to himself!
 

Pneumated1

Hall of Fame
I agree... big time.

The modern game is very much about racquet head speed, which means lighter weight sticks, which means increased stiffness to get the same power, which can and often does lead to more arm/elbow/shoulder problems.

Unless we've grown up hitting with the modern strokes, we are indeed often better served by heavy, flexible sticks that allow more relaxed grips and smooth strokes. And even with these older-style racquets, we can still hit some of the modern shots -- we'll get less spin and action on the ball than with modern sticks, to be sure, but we'll do it with much less violence to our arms/elbows/shoulders/bodies.

Painful to think about your buddy doing that to himself!
Don't get me wrong, I do take a full, fast swing at the ball, but elbow pain and common sense led me towards a weighted 300 Tour, and eventually to the C-10 Pro. Perhaps picking up the game at 31 has encouraged my decisions, but McEnroe did mention that even the elite pros have to do intense workouts on their arms to play these stiff and powerful rackets.
 

kiteboard

Banned
Listening to Becker and McEnroe, they both seem to match specific types of rackets to particular eras. Becker himself said yesterday that the former players, like himself, hit with heavy, flexible rackets. And McEnroe, a few days ago, was speaking of how the modern game almost demands the lighter, stiffer racket.

However, Becker and McEnroe (especially McEnroe) implied that they have not changed their playing styles or rackets to suit a more modern game. While many of us intermediate players make racket decisions based on the modern pro game, wouldn't we be better served to follow the lead of the former greats----with their heavy, flexible sticks and more relaxed strokes?

I'm 37 but often play with a really good former player and teaching pro in his mid-late 60's who almost left his arm detached on the court one day trying to emulate Nadal's forehand with a Pure Drive Cortex. I don't get it!
Mac does not know anything about gear. He's constantly wrong. Delpo is at 361g. Joker at 360g. Fed at 357g. etc. Nadal is the light weight.
 

Pneumated1

Hall of Fame
Mac does not know anything about gear. He's constantly wrong. Delpo is at 361g. Joker at 360g. Fed at 357g. etc. Nadal is the light weight.
I can't speak for McEnroe's knowledge of gear. However, McEnroe and Becker were alluding to the specs of their own rackets, which were in the 380-400 gram range. Of course exceptions do exist (Soderling, Del Potro, etc.), but as a whole, the game has gone lighter and stiffer.

My point was that intermediates like myself often go too light and stiff trying to hit Nadal-like shots. It's unrealistic for the middle-aged to older player. However, we can safely try to emulate Federer's strokes with our 340-360 gram rackets.
 

Mr_Shiver

Semi-Pro
I would loved to have seen an in their prime Becker or Sampras throw down a serve with a leaded up PDGT or other tweener strung with a full poly or hybrid. All that would be left is a cloud of yellow fuzz.
 

Doubles

Legend
I would loved to have seen an in their prime Becker or Sampras throw down a serve with a leaded up PDGT or other tweener strung with a full poly or hybrid. All that would be left is a cloud of yellow fuzz.
I have to agree. That would just be insane to see. I bet Pete could have served in the upper 140's easily...
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
Listening to Becker and McEnroe, they both seem to match specific types of rackets to particular eras. Becker himself said yesterday that the former players, like himself, hit with heavy, flexible rackets. And McEnroe, a few days ago, was speaking of how the modern game almost demands the lighter, stiffer racket.

However, Becker and McEnroe (especially McEnroe) implied that they have not changed their playing styles or rackets to suit a more modern game. While many of us intermediate players make racket decisions based on the modern pro game, wouldn't we be better served to follow the lead of the former greats----with their heavy, flexible sticks and more relaxed strokes?

I'm 37 but often play with a really good former player and teaching pro in his mid-late 60's who almost left his arm detached on the court one day trying to emulate Nadal's forehand with a Pure Drive Cortex. I don't get it!
Yes, we would. And that's why I do. :)
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
I can't speak for McEnroe's knowledge of gear. However, McEnroe and Becker were alluding to the specs of their own rackets, which were in the 380-400 gram range. Of course exceptions do exist (Soderling, Del Potro, etc.), but as a whole, the game has gone lighter and stiffer.

My point was that intermediates like myself often go too light and stiff trying to hit Nadal-like shots. It's unrealistic for the middle-aged to older player. However, we can safely try to emulate Federer's strokes with our 340-360 gram rackets.
I don't think anyone other than Nadal should be trying to emulate Nadal's strokes. There are many other pros whose strokes are better and more reasonable to try and emulate.

But if someone really is set on trying to emulate Nadal's strokes, I highly recommend they start off by wearing a football helmet since you know they will hit themselves in the head and knock themselves out with that lasso reverse forehand. :)
 

Pneumated1

Hall of Fame
I don't think anyone other than Nadal should be trying to emulate Nadal's strokes. There are many other pros whose strokes are better and more reasonable to try and emulate.But if someone really is set on trying to emulate Nadal's strokes, I highly recommend they start off by wearing a football helmet since you know they will hit themselves in the head and knock themselves out with that lasso reverse forehand. :)
I agree, and in all honesty, I've only known of one person attempting to do so----a guy in his late sixties of all people. I doubt I'm alone in thinking that there's something freakish and barbaric about Nadal's strokes. On the other hand, Federer's strokes are elegant and artistic, much more worthy of emulation.

We'll see who outlasts whom. I predict Federer will retire with 20 slams and Nadal will not play to thirty.
 

BreakPoint

Bionic Poster
Then what racket do you use? A classic I would presume, right? I use this method to an extent, but I use a modern racket...
I use several different racquets but all are pretty heavy, have small heads, and that old-school feel. :)
 
This might be of interest:

http://www.80s-tennis.com/pages/boris-becker.html

Wasn't Kuhnel also the inventor of the widebody concept? If it's the same guy, he is pretty much responsible for any and all innovations in racquet design since graphite.
Uli traveled and did Boris' stringing along with another stringer named Val. Roadies/racquet technicians, and assistant 'coaches' basically.

Siegfried Kuebler is the guy you were thinking of -- the designer/engineer of the widebody. I think his background was in aerospace.
 
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Lefty78

Professional
Not correct, Bosworth did customize rackets for Boris.
Correct.

For you collectors out there willing to part with some $, Bosworth still has some of Boris' unused personal stock of Estusa frames... built to his exact specs.
 

carlos djackal

Professional
I don't think anyone other than Nadal should be trying to emulate Nadal's strokes. There are many other pros whose strokes are better and more reasonable to try and emulate.

But if someone really is set on trying to emulate Nadal's strokes, I highly recommend they start off by wearing a football helmet since you know they will hit themselves in the head and knock themselves out with that lasso reverse forehand. :)


now this is funny but true....lol....
 
I would loved to have seen an in their prime Becker or Sampras throw down a serve with a leaded up PDGT or other tweener strung with a full poly or hybrid. All that would be left is a cloud of yellow fuzz.
no way, not the right type of racquet to utilize petes serve. if luxilon would have been around though, people would have REALLY tired of watching pete win service games.
 

migjam

Professional
And Boom-Boom thought that Muster's racquet was around 400 grams. That's unbelievable that he had those long rallies and matches with such a heavy racquet.

My PS88 is about 14 oz. and I can play maybe three or four days in a week with it, but then my arm needs a two week holiday.

Muster is a madman.
And what's even more crazy is the tension that Muster used in his racquets (90lbs)
 

tennistiger

Semi-Pro
Its to expensive. The 3100 rackets were made by Head in 1996 (the srew is NOT adjustable, the grip handle is changable like the other head rackets) and sold exclusivly at Sport Voswinkel shops in gemany at 800 DM (400€). But they sold only a few hundred of the 3100 at this price. Later in 1996 you could by this at Voswinkel and at last during the ATP Final for 200 DM (100€), without box but with full cover (I still own 8 of them).
 
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