Broke the 2 hour mark!!

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Ain't no way. It is almost impossible to weave a Corona bottle through the mains. I'm not going to call you a liar but how do you keep the lime from falling off?
Rubbish @Irvin

Very easy to weave a Corona with lime through the most dense of stringbeds as long as one is using the Stringway Cross Stringing Tool. Would not be surprised if @Technatic tested his protypes using Amstel, Grolsch and Heineken before releasing the product to market.

One great tip though. Make sure you have "pre-stretched" the Corona bottle by consuming its contents PRIOR to stringing. Using pre-stretched Coronas tend to have less affect on the racquet Balance.

Also make sure you use this Corona ...

https://www.drinksupermarket.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/c/o/corona-premium-mexican-lager-beer-12x-710ml-4-6-abv_temp.jpg

Or the thicker gauge ...

https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/8ae466db-5d99-45fb-87c6-dbab9151c028_1.d42cd5186ddffb52dcd4b42090b68ce7.jpeg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF

Rather than this one ...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Toyota_Corona_2.0_GLi_(ST191)_front.jpg/280px-Toyota_Corona_2.0_GLi_(ST191)_front.jpg
 
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meltphace 6

Hall of Fame
Anyone who strings in 20 mins. is a flat out liar.
19 min 30 sec

Racquet: Wilson k six.one 95 16 x 18, string: Babolat Pro Hurricane 1.30 mm, stringing machine: Babolat VS 3002

TTPS, well played.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Hahaha, yeah, those are just crazy.
I don't string a lot, but most racquets seem fairly intuitive when it comes to figuring out the holes, but the T2000... Brutal. Even with a diagram to help me it was still hard. I had an easier time stringing my wood racquet that was 100+ years old.
 

meltphace 6

Hall of Fame
I don't string a lot, but most racquets seem fairly intuitive when it comes to figuring out the holes, but the T2000... Brutal. Even with a diagram to help me it was still hard. I had an easier time stringing my wood racquet that was 100+ years old.
Brutal describes it pretty accurately. I can't even remember what knots I used when I strung this racquet.

 
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jim e

Legend
Back in the late 60's I strung a great number of those T-2000 racquets.
The knots used were specific for that racquet.
They were not too bad once you strung up a number of them. It became routine, I would just not string nat. gut with those is all. Took to much time to tube all loops for nat. gut.
I use to see the same mistakes made on the T-2000 from stringers elsewhere that did not follow instructions. Wilson had a short manual on stringing them, and it was really not that bad once you had it down.
Back then there was mainly wooden racquets and these T-2000's then came along some aluminum's like the Chemold racquet, and odd ball metal racquets like the Sterling racquets where you needed specific instructions on stringing it.
No digests were out for patterns as there really was not that many different patterns at the time.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Did it not occur to anyone to just drill holes in the frame and then use tubing to string the racquet in a conventional manner?

Or was the hoop structure an impediment to having small holes drilled into it?

The diagram shows an 18x18 pattern. Thing would have been even better with a 16 x 18 pattern assuming the frame could support that without deforming.

I do know that the Wilson Jimmy Connors Professional racquet released some years after the T2000 and T3000 did have holes and grommets. The got there in the end. But that racquet did not look as "out there" as the earlier ones did.
 
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mmk

Hall of Fame
thats impressive 45rkts 1 day, that's min 10-11hrs work
whats more impressive to me is that these rakets are not 16x16 patterns.. with syn.gut
provably most all.poly and lots of them with 18/20 patterns
tnx for sharing..

ohh and no mistakes.
And having to handle different racquet mountings as well. Since I only string for myself, I don't have to change the distance between the 6& 12 mounts, don't have to adjust to make sure the other four mounts aren't blocking holes, etc. Even if he only gets a couple different types of racquets, say half APDs and half PT57s, he still might have to switch mounts every couple of string jobs since it would be unlikely to get all APDs followed by all PT57s.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
^^ im thinking yes and no, you mentioned "every couple racquets", its more like every 5-7 racquets; I belive Federer mentioned that he uses 5-7 for a 3set match, and 7-10 for a 5setter,,, but it still does not discount your post, every racquet gets mounting attention..
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
Did it not occur to anyone to just drill holes in the frame and then use tubing to string the racquet in a conventional manner?

Or was the hoop structure an impediment to having small holes drilled into it?

The diagram shows an 18x18 pattern. Thing would have been even better with a 16 x 18 pattern assuming the frame could support that without deforming.

I do know that the Wilson Jimmy Connors Professional racquet released some years after the T2000 and T3000 did have holes and grommets. The got there in the end. But that racquet did not look as "out there" as the earlier ones did.
Even if possible , that would have eliminated the point of that frame design (and I suspect an attempt of such vandalism would have destroyed the utility of the frame). Rene Lacoste was a key person behind the design of that technology and the wire suspense system was specifically designed to increase power with the trampoline effect. If someone wanted a metal (steel or aluminum) frame with traditional holes, plenty were available at that time.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
Even if possible , that would have eliminated the point of that frame design (and I suspect an attempt of such vandalism would have destroyed the utility of the frame). Rene Lacoste was a key person behind the design of that technology and the wire suspense system was specifically designed to increase power with the trampoline effect. If someone wanted a metal (steel or aluminum) frame with traditional holes, plenty were available at that time.
And they were awful, and tended to break.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^indeed they were (at least until Howard Head came along). The Classic Racquet Section has some good threads on metal racquets.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Even if possible , that would have eliminated the point of that frame design (and I suspect an attempt of such vandalism would have destroyed the utility of the frame). Rene Lacoste was a key person behind the design of that technology and the wire suspense system was specifically designed to increase power with the trampoline effect. If someone wanted a metal (steel or aluminum) frame with traditional holes, plenty were available at that time.
Interesting stuff.

I will always wonder how Connors would have performed if he had persevered with traditional wooden racquets at that time.
 

gmatheis

Hall of Fame
Just timed myself for fun - and I'm definitely not a fast stringer, but I believe I do a good job.

Gamma 5800 ELS
16x19 pattern on a racquet I have never strung before
strung 2 piece , stringing time includes cutting string from the reel.
Full Poly

1.5 min cutout
1.5 min mount
30.0 minutes stringing (I think I can shave off 2-3 minutes here easily by just pulling the slack faster at the start of the crosses and I partially blocked a tie off hole with the clamp by accident which wasted some time)
1 minute straightening

34 minutes from start to finish.

I string maybe 2 racquets a week on average
 
I got it down to 1:20
A new record !
This was my first synth stringing.
Weaves were way easier.

It took 8 mins to
cut strings
mount racket
open strings
line up strings on center grommets.

By 33 mins. I was done with mains.
So, the mains took 25 mins. (including both knots)

By 1:19, I finished the crosses.
So, that took about 45 mins.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
Strung again.
Took me EXACTLY the same amount of time.
1:42

It took me 7 mins. just to cut off the strings and remove them.
Anyone who strings in 20 mins. is a flat out liar.
Here's Richard Parnell casually stringing and taking his time. On a ATW pattern which usually takes longer. Even if he had to cut the strings out., measure and cut string, etc... it would be under 20 min.

IMO the faster you can string without making errors the better. Especially on a ratchet dropweight.... less variability for each pull.


When I first saw the title for this thread I thought it meant the OP finally went past 2Hrs before breaking a string.
 
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richardc-s

Semi-Pro
I just broke the 45min mark :)

I use a dropweight machine and strung a 1 piece on a 16x19 Babolat. I wasn't rushing, so I was quite pleased with that time. If I rushed I could probably knock another 5-10mins off that time, but I'd rather not risk making a mistake.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
I just broke the 45min mark :)

I use a dropweight machine and strung a 1 piece on a 16x19 Babolat. I wasn't rushing, so I was quite pleased with that time. If I rushed I could probably knock another 5-10mins off that time, but I'd rather not risk making a mistake.
45 minutes end to end... from checking out the racquet, getting the pattern, cutting the strings... all the way to putting the vibration dampener back is actually not too bad. Keep at it and you'll be able to knock off the 5~10 min without unnecessary rushing. Remember... faster is better.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
I just broke the 45min mark :)

I use a dropweight machine and strung a 1 piece on a 16x19 Babolat.
Fantastic. I got down to about 45 min stringing my Babolat racquets.

I recently starting stringing some Wilson racquets but my stringing times blew out again because of strings blocking holes. Very frustrating. In the process of acquiring a Guide Awl so I hope I can get my times back down to 45 mins for those pesky sticks.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I got it down to 1:20
A new record !
This was my first synth stringing.
Weaves were way easier.

It took 8 mins to
cut strings
mount racket
open strings
line up strings on center grommets.

By 33 mins. I was done with mains.
So, the mains took 25 mins. (including both knots)

By 1:19, I finished the crosses.
So, that took about 45 mins.
i only start counting the time presuming it's mounted and ready to go... because i usually:
* cut out strings at the courts... usually while post-tennis chatting...
* since i have 3 frames... one is usally always pre mounted (basically always out, and next to the tv)... breaking a 2nd frame is usually when i decide to string
* usually measure/cut string, and set it aside (because sometimes it gets tangled... so prefer to separate out this part from actually stringing - so when i'm read to string, that's all i have to do)
* i always regrip
* always apply ducttape to bump (diy bumper guard tape :p)
if i did all this in one go, it's usually an hour or so, taking my time, usually watching tennis channeL :p
 

jim e

Legend
one is usally always pre mounted (basically always out, and next to the tv)... breaking a 2nd frame is usually when i decide to string
You must be rough on your equipment if you break your frames, as you said above, yet alone" breaking a 2nd frame".
Bad temper??
I remember a time when someone I hit with threw is racquet and then kicked it into the fence.
I checked it over real well when he brought it later for me to string.
 
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D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
You must be rough on your equipment if you break your frames, as you said above, yet alone breaking a 2nd frame.
Bad temper??
I remember a time when someone I hit with threw is racquet and then kicked it into the fence.
I checked it over real well when he brought it later for me to string.
breaking the string on a second frame...
 

Dimcorner

Professional
I do about 45 minutes not rushing (and no pre-stretching) on my Yonex from cutout to ready to play and throwing away the trash.
I come from a LONG experience of doing badminton racquets and I can get one of those down in about 35 mins (floating clamps help). You gotta be very precise and careful when your strings are only 22 gauge and you have a 22x23 pattern :)
 

oldcity

Rookie
congrats on breaking the 2hr mark. I remember having a couple 3+hour disasters when I started. don't rush too much, I still had some mishaps the first year when I thought I knew what I was doing. I'm at 45 minutes average on a crank. yonex 16x19 with poly. A fast weave still escapes me. whatever I'm not a pro
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
congrats on breaking the 2hr mark. I remember having a couple 3+hour disasters when I started. don't rush too much, I still had some mishaps the first year when I thought I knew what I was doing. I'm at 45 minutes average on a crank. yonex 16x19 with poly. A fast weave still escapes me. whatever I'm not a pro
45 minutes with manual cross string weaving is pretty good. If you are not a fast weaver, you could probably reduce that time by another 5 to 10 minutes with a Cross Stringing Tool. I'm a terribly slow weaver and the tool saves me up to 15 minutes per stick depending on the racquet and string type.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
My first stringer was a Tremont stringer where you had to crank the string with a spring tensioner and it used to take my about an hour to string a racket. I thought I was doing pretty good with it. Then I got a used Prince CP stringer. Wow, my time dropped to almost 30 minutes almost immediately, and it was not long until I was around 20 minutes. What stringing machine you use makes all the difference in the world. If I were to bet on whether a machine or a weaving tool would make the stringing more efficient I would go for the machine in a heart beat.

A weaving tool raises the strings you're going under, and lowers the strings you are going over so you can weaver faster. You can do the same thing weaving one ahead if you do it right.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
45 minutes with manual cross string weaving is pretty good. If you are not a fast weaver, you could probably reduce that time by another 5 to 10 minutes with a Cross Stringing Tool. I'm a terribly slow weaver and the tool saves me up to 15 minutes per stick depending on the racquet and string type.
I just strung 3 racquets last night on a DW machine. I think I take about 40min each. But this includes the time to take the strings out of the package and sometimes mess with the birds nest as I've not figured a good method to measure off 20' and cut. I typically try to find the mid-point and come back with equal length and then cut. This would save me 5min.

I think one of the racquets already had the strings cut and I had 2-1/2 sets already organized. That one took me 30min.

One thing that prevented me from stringing one more racquet was my fingers were starting to feel a bit raw. I didn't even want to straighten the strings when I was done. I suppose if I strung daily, I would build up the right callouses. But for now, call me tender fingers.
 

jim e

Legend
when you are done, I like to be sure all strings are nice and straight. If fingers too sore, many stringers use a set off tool.
All you really need is a Phillips screwdriver and grind point to nice blunt end, and that works nice. Very similar to set off tool.
 

FFo

New User
Learning to weave faster and all the little things learned from forum have helped me to get it down to 35 mins on 16x19. Biggest problem is when I weave the crosses I can't keep the racket still. It keeps turning and "running away" when push-weaving.

Little things that save some time:
Learn your knots, you can do parnell knot in about 10 secs.
When pulling the crosses keep the tip in hand and you are ready to go for next weave.
If starting crosses with starting clamp you don't have to pull the first cross twice. Just do it when removing the starting clamp.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
Learn your knots, you can do parnell knot in about 10 secs.
Man I need to learn Parnell knot and Wilson pro knot...
If starting crosses with starting clamp you don't have to pull the first cross twice. Just do it when removing the starting clamp.
So just put clamp 1 in place and move onto 2nd cross tension and clamp? Then come back to tension 1st cross?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
So just put clamp 1 in place and move onto 2nd cross tension and clamp? Then come back to tension 1st cross?
You can’t tie off the top cross until you tension and clamp an odd numbered cross which frees up the clamp you need to hold the top cross.
 

esgee48

Legend
Man I need to learn Parnell knot and Wilson pro knot...
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/youtube-videos-how-to.172626/
However, if you use NG, I would stay with the DHH. The Ashaway ZYEX string is another that should be done with a DHH.
You have a FC machine. The method outlined in your manual will work for starting crosses as well as mains. I prefer to use a starting knot if needed since less string is needed. Just set the knot, tension and clamp, then go down the frame. If you want to tie cross on cross, then use a starting clamp or FC to hold cross 1, do cross 2, tension, clamp, do cross 3, tension, clamp, go back to 1 and tension, clamp, tie off cross1 on your cross string.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
You can’t tie off the top cross until you tension and clamp an odd numbered cross which frees up the clamp you need to hold the top cross.
Understood.

I've been wasting time by tensioning 1st cross with starting clamp.

I could start tensioning 2nd cross, then 3rd, then back to 1 which ties off to cross #3 already tensioned and then continue on.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
If starting crosses with starting clamp you don't have to pull the first cross twice. Just do it when removing the starting clamp.
Ho Ho! I love these threads. I've just strung my 150th racquet . Always started the crosses with a Starting Clamp and always pulled the first cross first. Won't ever do that again. But I do use a LO machine and I double pull every string as per @Irvin's videos regarding emulating a CP machine with a LO. So I will double pull the first cross just prior to tie off.

The other gem I just picked up (once again Thanks to @Irvin) is to pre weave first two crosses before I weave and tension the last 2 mains. This saves me a lot of pain trying to deal with blocked holes stringing the second cross on a Wilson PS97 until I get my hands on a Guide Awl.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Always started the crosses with a Starting Clamp and always pulled the first cross first. Won't ever do that again.
Good idea pulling direct tension on a string in a clamp (no matter what type of clamp it is) is a bad idea. That puts maximum stress on the string in the clamp, and if it is every going to slip that will be the time.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Good idea pulling direct tension on a string in a clamp (no matter what type of clamp it is) is a bad idea. That puts maximum stress on the string in the clamp, and if it is every going to slip that will be the time.
I've only had a "slip" in that situation once or twice and that was with a very slick cross string. I've always done it that way because of a demo video I saw on youtube. But not anymore! :)
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I've only had a "slip" in that situation once or twice and that was with a very slick cross string. I've always done it that way because of a demo video I saw on youtube. But not anymore! :)
If that string ever slips even slightly it may not cause the problem immediately but the point where that string was being held is now bending around the grommet and or may be in the knot itself. You could have premature braking near that location the next day, next week, next month or it may never break. I think it is best to avoid it completely.
 
pre weave first two crosses before I weave and tension the last 2 mains. This saves me a lot of pain trying to deal with blocked holes stringing the second cross on a Wilson PS97 until I get my hands on a Guide Awl.
Can you elaborate on this?
I strung my fastest time this weekend, but got hung up on the first cross.
Both grommets for the first cross were blocked.
16ga string was too big for the awl tool
 
Got my time down to 1:04 !!!!!!!!!!!!!

This included getting stuck with blocked holes, explained above.
If I don't count removing strings, mounting the racket that gets me down to 59 mins.

I can now do the entire process without looking at reference rackets or rewatching knots videos.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Can you elaborate on this?
I strung my fastest time this weekend, but got hung up on the first cross.
Both grommets for the first cross were blocked.
16ga string was too big for the awl tool
String and tension the center mains so your clamps are on the bottom of the racket (out of the way) and no holes are blocked at the top of the racket. Then weave in the top crosses and finish your mains.
 

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
String and tension the center mains so your clamps are on the bottom of the racket (out of the way) and no holes are blocked at the top of the racket. Then weave in the top crosses and finish your mains.
Yes, this works really well for me. Especially the Babolat Aeropro racquets where they have that grove that the strings run in.

As an aside I asked Santa to get me the best Pathfinder awl I saw feedback on.... What a waist of money!!!

I have had difficulty inserting into the grommets both times I have tried the tool and have abandoned both times to instead cutting a very sharp point on the string and using pliers to coax in.

Speaking from a rookie perspective, the pre-weave technique described here is the way to go to avoid issues.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
As an aside I asked Santa to get me the best Pathfinder awl I saw feedback on.... What a waist of money!!!
I love my Pathfinder awl. Absolutely love it, I find it handier than any tool I have except for maybe a starting clamp. But I hardly every try to insert the pathfinder awl in a blocked grommet hole. I insert the awl before the grommet is blocked. For instance, I like to use a Yonex loop for the outside mains when I can. Say I stringing a racket that skips 8 H&T and the mains tie off at 6T. After running in the center 12 mains I Insert the awl in 7T and the string goes in 9T to run in the 8th main. Then I string the 7th mains in 7H to 7T where the awl is (it does not matter if the swl goes through 7T or not as long as it get past the string on the outside groove of the racket. After I insert the string in 7T and the awl I remove the awl and I'm done. Slicker than snot on a glass door knob. Another benefit is the 7th main ends up on top of the outside string and when I tie off at 6T I never have a crossover becuase my knot usually end up on top too. Then when I tie off the bottom cross coming out of 8T it's on top of the outside string and again no crossovers.
 
I still don't get what a starting clamps is for.

Is it for the first 2 mains?
I usually thread the first 2 mains, and then line them up to be equal length (pulling across the room)
Then I clamp them together, and then start on one side of the mains.

For starting the crosses, I just tie the starting knot.
Then I drop weight the first cross just to tighten the knot.
Then I weave the 2nd cross and drop weight that and clamp the 2 strings.

I suspect both of these are incorrect.
 
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