Broke the 2 hour mark!!

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
I love my Pathfinder awl. Absolutely love it, I find it handier than any tool I have except for maybe a starting clamp. But I hardly every try to insert the pathfinder awl in a blocked grommet hole. I insert the awl before the grommet is blocked. For instance, I like to use a Yonex loop for the outside mains when I can. Say I stringing a racket that skips 8 H&T and the mains tie off at 6T. After running in the center 12 mains I Insert the awl in 7T and the string goes in 9T to run in the 8th main. Then I string the 7th mains in 7H to 7T where the awl is (it does not matter if the swl goes through 7T or not as long as it get past the string on the outside groove of the racket. After I insert the string in 7T and the awl I remove the awl and I'm done. Slicker than snot on a glass door knob. Another benefit is the 7th main ends up on top of the outside string and when I tie off at 6T I never have a crossover becuase my knot usually end up on top too. Then when I tie off the bottom cross coming out of 8T it's on top of the outside string and again no crossovers.
Hi Irvin, you have been giving me assignments lately.... Today I started research the Yonex Loop!!!!

I started after work and will do some more tomorrow.

Thanks for your help!
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
BITD there was a Babolat stringing tool that made weaving easier. Anyone remember the name and whether it is/was effective?
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
I still don't get what a starting clamps is for.

Is it for the first 2 mains?
I usually thread the first 2 mains, and then line them up to be equal length (pulling across the room)
Then I clamp them together, and then start on one side of the mains.

For starting the crosses, I just tie the starting knot.
Then I drop weight the first cross just to tighten the knot.
Then I weave the 2nd cross and drop weight that and clamp the 2 strings.

I suspect both of these are incorrect.
Go to youtube and search on starting clamp
 

oldcity

Rookie
for two piece stringing w/o a starting knot it means you only have to tension the first string once I think. run string through first and second. use start clamp on #1 outside of frame. tension #2 & 3. Then you can tension #1 once and tie off.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
for two piece stringing w/o a starting knot it means you only have to tension the first string once I think. run string through first and second. use start clamp on #1 outside of frame. tension #2 & 3. Then you can tension #1 once and tie off.
That's 2x.
 

max

Legend
For me, I don't give a whit about speed.

I want to do a GOOD, GOOD job.

So it's okay if I take longer than 10 minutes. . . or an hour. It just don't matter----quality of the string job is my metric, not speed (which would make me sloppy).
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
For me, I don't give a whit about speed.

I want to do a GOOD, GOOD job.

So it's okay if I take longer than 10 minutes. . . or an hour. It just don't matter----quality of the string job is my metric, not speed (which would make me sloppy).
IMO it's better to be fast and accurate than slow and accurate. So string as fast as possible while being methodical and error free.

My reasoning is that the quicker one is stringing.... there is just less variability between each weave and pull. A 30 minute error free string job will be more consistent than a 2Hr error free string job.
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
IMO it's better to be fast and accurate than slow and accurate. So string as fast as possible while being methodical and error free.

My reasoning is that the quicker one is stringing.... there is just less variability between each weave and pull. A 30 minute error free string job will be more consistent than a 2Hr error free string job.
I come to believe this to be true as well. Normally, it takes me about 30-35 mins to string a racquet, not including the pre- and post-stringing work. During the last 3 or 4 months, twice I had the misfortune of getting distracted with various things while stringing and it took me nearly 70-75 mins to do the racquets. The results of those stringing work were that the string bed stiffness were noticeably higher, RT also read about 7-8% higher tension, and playability weren't as good as I am able to get consistently (thankfully these were my own racquets).

I used to think that speed, for me, is not a factor when stringing, and quality is far more important. After those two incidents, I concluded that to get consistent and quality results, once I start stringing I need to ignore all other distractions and finish the job as quickly (and error free) as possible, balancing the two variables is important.
 

max

Legend
Good point. My favorite time to string is early Sunday morning, well before church, with just a cup of coffee and the radio going.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
IMO it's better to be fast and accurate than slow and accurate. So string as fast as possible while being methodical and error free.

My reasoning is that the quicker one is stringing.... there is just less variability between each weave and pull. A 30 minute error free string job will be more consistent than a 2Hr error free string job.

:D
 

lidoazndiabloboi

Hall of Fame
I wanted to throw in my observations. I am by no means a super fast stringer, I think I max out at 16 mins.
I strung 3 rackets, all 16x19 over the weekend with ALU and RPM Rough. The entire process from start to finish, including mounting and fixing strings afterward, took me 1 hr and 9 mins.
Wasn't trying to push hard for speed, just going at an average pace.

3 mins to cut and take out strings for 3 rackets
Racket 1 - 19m 40s
Racket 2 - 23m
Racket 3 - 23m 40s

When I first started stringing, my first racket took me 4ish hours. Didnt sleep till 3am. It was a lot of frustration and youtube watching. The double blocked grommet hole kicked my ass. But practice and repetition helps so much. Don't get discouraged!
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
I wanted to throw in my observations. I am by no means a super fast stringer, I think I max out at 16 mins.
I strung 3 rackets, all 16x19 over the weekend with ALU and RPM Rough. The entire process from start to finish, including mounting and fixing strings afterward, took me 1 hr and 9 mins.
Wasn't trying to push hard for speed, just going at an average pace.

3 mins to cut and take out strings for 3 rackets
Racket 1 - 19m 40s
Racket 2 - 23m
Racket 3 - 23m 40s

When I first started stringing, my first racket took me 4ish hours. Didnt sleep till 3am. It was a lot of frustration and youtube watching. The double blocked grommet hole kicked my ass. But practice and repetition helps so much. Don't get discouraged!
Yep.... and when I do a lot of frames, I can get into the zone and be on autopilot.... no unnecessary movement, every movement is efficient with little/no pause in between.... But that's also when I can mentally check out and make an error. When it's all working though... I feel like an artist.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Yep.... and when I do a lot of frames, I can get into the zone and be on autopilot.... no unnecessary movement, every movement is efficient with little/no pause in between.... But that's also when I can mentally check out and make an error. When it's all working though... I feel like an artist.
Like an artist huuu??!!,,o_O
do tell,, like picasso or van gogh(big difference)? :confused:

Haaa, just kidding,, I know exactly what you mean :)
 
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Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
The results of those stringing work were that the string bed stiffness were noticeably higher, RT also read about 7-8% higher tension, and playability weren't as good as I am able to get consistently (thankfully these were my own racquets).
I'm a little perplexed why you would say that string jobs with higher SBS have less playability. Personally, I think it is the reverse. String jobs with lower SBS are much more variable on the court. It also depends on the racquet.

Did you confuse playability with tension maintenance?
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Just cut from the center and cut a main and cross at same time angle over to each corner, once all cut, stitch your hand in the center and push out a hand full. You'll feel a little pain but no blood.
So you'll have small loops just pull all the ones with no knots or no two strings out.
Then feed through the doubles , pull knots out toward center, done , under a minute
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
I'm a little perplexed why you would say that string jobs with higher SBS have less playability. Personally, I think it is the reverse. String jobs with lower SBS are much more variable on the court. It also depends on the racquet.

Did you confuse playability with tension maintenance?
The way I wrote my comment probably made you jump to a conclusion that I equated higher SBS to less playability, that was not my intention necessarily. My observation is that the resultant string job had higher SBS both times, and incidentally, playability with in those instances were poorer. I was not trying to link the two together with a purpose.

Although, unless I hit a SBS between 34-35, playability of my racquet is really poor for my game; below or above that range. In the instances I mention, SBS was 36 and 37 respectively.
 
Did another one in 1:07.
Slower than last time.

Took me 5:30 mins to remove strings and clamp down the racket.
Unravelling the string took about 4 mins, since everything got tangled.

16 mins to do the mains.
7 mins. to tie starting knot.
32 mins. top do the rest of the crosses.
2 mins for last Parnell knot.
 

RogerShrederer

New User
I certainly wouldn't want someone removing my strings in just 20 seconds. :eek:

In my opinion, that would be way too fast. For all the strings to be removed in 20 seconds, one, if not both, of 2 things would have to be occurring.

1. Some improper method of actually cutting the strings themselves. Cutting them correctly, in a systematic manner, should take at least 20 seconds by itself.
After all, you are typically cutting 34, or more, strings.

2. The strings (that have now been cut) being RIPPED out of the frame at some feverish rate of speed.
This is going to melt/damage grommets from friction burns. After all, they're made of mere plastic and not impervious to the friction/heat generated.

If I had to spend time/money replacing grommets, because of some careless stringer burning/damaging them, I know I'd be more than upset. :mad:

Personally, my approach to stringing racquets for clients, is much like that of a physician who has taken the Hippocratic oath... "First, do no harm".
I cant believe you typed all of that out. I also can't believe I read it. smh
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Took me 55 seconds and I wasn't rushing, to cut and take out strings. Heat generation per grommet hole ripping out strings was 34 millijoules much less than the index for plastic in the idgaf tables.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Did another one in 1:07.
Slower than last time.

Took me 5:30 mins to remove strings and clamp down the racket.
Unravelling the string took about 4 mins, since everything got tangled.

16 mins to do the mains.
7 mins. to tie starting knot.
32 mins. top do the rest of the crosses.
2 mins for last Parnell knot.
Your focusing too much time on the wrong things,,,
focus more on mounting raket properly
but specially on not damaging the string

kinks are bad..

you will get your time down soon enough!!
learning to take better care of raket/string is much more important than how fast you can cut strings out..
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
The 34 millijoules was b.s. , the time wasn't. I need to get a mini hdmi to hdmi so I can move videos from gopro5 to computer. I'm notoriously not getting stuff done, tennis so much fun and all.
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
When you unwrap string hold the coil in one hand and unwind by pulling each coil in order out with other, should prevent the rats nest, cut string in half or 19/21, then feed two center mains then mount racquet then even strings and start.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
I used to tie those a long time ago with my ties but never would I attempt someone like that with a tennis string. LOL
@Irvin, I think you may be onto something there.

Modern fashion trend ... Ties fashioned from tennis string.

Poly Ties
- For the Power Broker. Traditional Black and Round for the Conservative Leaders, Chairman of the Board, Company Presidents etc.
- Shaped and Colorful for those who want a touch of Presidential individuality.

Mutifilament Ties - For the more Flexible Corporate Leader type. A range of colors and textures to suit every Personality.

Synthetic Gut Ties - For the Pragmatist, Budget Conscious, or anyone who wants to blend in with the crowd.

Natural Gut Ties - For those who care for the Environment and the Planet and want to show it.

Zyex Ties - For the Eccentric who always wants to be just that little bit different.

Kevlar Ties - For the man (or women) who thinks one tie is more than enough for any occasion.
 

gmatheis

Hall of Fame
The 34 millijoules was b.s. , the time wasn't. I need to get a mini hdmi to hdmi so I can move videos from gopro5 to computer. I'm notoriously not getting stuff done, tennis so much fun and all.
can't you just pull the SD card out and put it in the computer?
 

WarrenMP

Professional
Start the stopwatch
0:00

Cut, remove, and dispose of strings off old racket
5:00

Mount racket
Clamp it down
8:00

Open string packet,
Unravel.
Measure 9 racket lengths
Cut string
11:00

Line up mains
along center grommet and pull to even length
13:00

String left side of Mains
Tie first Parnell knot
29:00

String right side of Mains
Tie 2nd Parnell knot
Mains are done.
41:00

Begin crosses
Tie starting knot
52:00

Finish weaving crosses
1:38:00

Tie last Parnell knot
1:41


I am ECSTATIC at how fast this one went!!
Not bad at all. It use to take me some time to string a racquet. I don't string professionally, but I was able to cut the time down to 20 mins for synth, 25/40 mins for every other type. I have never factored in the cutting out old strings. It usually takes me 3 mins for that.
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
can't you just pull the SD card out and put it in the computer?
Good point, don't like to wear down the gold contacts, plus it was a challenge loading it, I'll order cable now, get it done. Seriously I timed myself and took my time thinking ," oh great I'll have to recant when I come in at 1:07", but it was under 1 minute, I'll fly next time in under 50 s.
 
I feel like I've topped out, and even going backwards.
Just did another one in 1:06
(1:11 if you count removing strings and mounting the racket)

Open & Cut string (got tangled)
4 mins

Line up 2 center mains (even length)
6 mins.

String left side of Mains (Parnell knot)
15 mins

String right side of Mains
24 mins.

Do first cross.
Tie starting knot
Tension to tighten knot
Deal with 2 blocked grommets
32 mins.

Finish weaving crosses
Tie last Parnell knot
1:06

The first cross takes me 8 mins.
This includes tying the knot.
I even prevented the blocked the grommets for the first cross.
But, the two blocked grommets still slow things down.

 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Evening up center mains. Leave a descent size loop at one end of racquet. Line up the ends, work your way back to racquet, pull both strings together to pull loop through evenly. 1 min tops
 

jim e

Legend
I feel like I've topped out, and even going backwards.
Just did another one in 1:06
(1:11 if you count removing strings and mounting the racket)

Open & Cut string (got tangled)
4 mins

Line up 2 center mains (even length)
6 mins.

String left side of Mains (Parnell knot)
15 mins

String right side of Mains
24 mins.

Do first cross.
.
From your post, it sounds like you strung all mains one side then same on other side.
You do know that you are not suppose to go more than 3 a side, then go to other side to keep even, that said, I typically go only 2 a side tensioning mains.
 
Evening up center mains. Leave a descent size loop at one end of racquet. Line up the ends, work your way back to racquet, pull both strings together to pull loop through evenly. 1 min tops
Not sure what you're trying to say, but this gives me an idea.
I was feeding one string thru, pulling it a bunch, and then pulling the 2nd string thru.
Then I would line them up and play tug-o-war (but poly does not slide)
So, it takes like 2 mins.

I will try feeding both ends into the 2 center grommets at the same time.
That way, the ends are already even. Is that what you mean?
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Not sure what you're trying to say, but this gives me an idea.
I was feeding one string thru, pulling it a bunch, and then pulling the 2nd string thru.
Then I would line them up and play tug-o-war (but poly does not slide)
So, it takes like 2 mins.

I will try feeding both ends into the 2 center grommets at the same time.
That way, the ends are already even. Is that what you mean?
Pretty much, I put them through then mount, then even up by pulling through with ends together, just that I put them 3/4 of the way through, then line up and pull so the loop doesn't rats nest in the throat
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
I
Deal with 2 blocked grommets

The first cross takes me 8 mins.
This includes tying the knot.
I even prevented the blocked the grommets for the first cross.
But, the two blocked grommets still slow things down.
Preweave the first two cross strings before stringing and tensioning the last 2, 4 or 6 Mains. Doing this avoids blocked holes at the top of the frame. One of @Irvin's Sergetti stringing videos shows how to do it.

Alternatively, use pieces of scrap string fed through the holes which will be blocked. Then when you are ready to weave the cross strings, push the tip through the blocked hole while slowly pulling the scrap string out. If you get the timing right, your cross string will feed through easily. No pliers required! Otherwise get yourself some Guide Awls.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
Took me 55 seconds and I wasn't rushing, to cut and take out strings. Heat generation per grommet hole ripping out strings was 34 millijoules much less than the index for plastic in the idgaf tables.
I use one of these $10 shears, cut all the way around the string bed starting at the throat, mains and crosses together, then I only have to pull a short length of string through the grommets. Takes me well under a minute.
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
With regards to post 140


My pure drive had similar issue when new mainly just on lower cross do to double coverage, I changed main tie off to main 7 and now just need to stick all in a couple times and cut cross at 45 to 75 degree angle slides through. Upper same deal. This is with revolve 16
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
I feel like I've topped out, and even going backwards.
Just did another one in 1:06
(1:11 if you count removing strings and mounting the racket)

Open & Cut string (got tangled)
4 mins

Line up 2 center mains (even length)
6 mins.

String left side of Mains (Parnell knot)
15 mins

String right side of Mains
24 mins.

Do first cross.
Tie starting knot
Tension to tighten knot
Deal with 2 blocked grommets
32 mins.

Finish weaving crosses
Tie last Parnell knot
1:06

The first cross takes me 8 mins.
This includes tying the knot.
I even prevented the blocked the grommets for the first cross.
But, the two blocked grommets still slow things down.

When you start the mains (assuming you're doing a 2 piece) just put both ends through the center 2 holes and pull them through the other side. When you pull the ends through the other side make sure they are even length, keep them equal length and pull all the rest of the string through the frame. Takes 30 seconds vs measuring for 6 mins.

For the starting knot...ditch it. Weave the first cross into the 2nd pair of cross holes from the top of the frame then back up through the first. Put a starting clamp on the outside of the 1st cross and work your way down. At the end pull tension on the 1st cross, remove the starting clamp and tie it off like a normal tie off.

That should save you 30 mins. When I started it took me 1-1.5 hours now I'm down to 24 mins on a 16x19 with 1.30 poly.
 
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