Broke the 2 hour mark!!

Put a starting clamp on the outside of the 1st cross and work your way down. At the end pull tension on the 1st cross, remove the starting clamp and tie it off like a normal tie off.
Why complete all the crosses before going back to the top cross and finishing the job? There is a small risk the Starting Clamp might slip. The longer the Starting Clamp is in play the more chance it will slip. I understand if it slips it will probably make little difference to the overall tension of the bed. But would not it be better to finish the top cross asap, perhaps after tensioning the 3rd cross and clamping it on the opposite side of the hoop? (Personally, I prefer to get the Starting Clamp off the frame asap.)
 
So after reading thru this entire thread, this is what I have gleaned so far:

-the OP does not care about quality of job, since he is stringing one full side of mains at a time, then defending by saying something like, "yeah, but my racquet is still round" - which in itself is not accurate

-the OP is new to stringing, but still calls very experienced and polished stringers liars, mainly due to his inexperience.

-OP demands others post videos of their claims, but won't post video of his own attempts

-there are some really good stringers on this site (as I have said many times in the past), and a general stringer like myself can and has learned a LOT

-this site and this thread cracks me up with the humor


Me- I use the same Klippermate drop weight stringer which I've had for 15+ years. No need to upgrade as I only string maybe once stick a week for personal use and occasionally for family/friends.

First racquet took about 2 hours, now it takes between 40 - 50 minutes start to finish depending on how much of a hurry I am in, and coil memory. I think coil memory is one of the biggest variable impediments.

I use a regular wire cutter to snip the strings. I cut on a diagonal C & M at same time working out from the center. Cutting takes about 20 seconds. Pulling the string pieces takes about a minute.

To unspool I have an eyehook screwed into a door frame. I loop one end thru and hold the spool in the other hand. Then I walk across the room holding the end in one hand and letting the roll unspool in my other. When the everything is unspooled, I even up the ends and the section in the eye hook is the middle 20'. At this point I grab the ends with a needle nose pliers and give it a stretch. Total process takes maybe 2 minutes at most. I do this even when doing a 1 pc because it is an easy way unravel and do a pre-stretch.

So for me, maybe 5 minutes total to cut/remove strings, stretch string, mount racquet.
 
I posted this in your last thread with more commentary, but your thread got deleted. TLDR, WTA player Paula Ormaechea does her own racquets in under 15 minutes

 
Why complete all the crosses before going back to the top cross and finishing the job? There is a small risk the Starting Clamp might slip. The longer the Starting Clamp is in play the more chance it will slip. I understand if it slips it will probably make little difference to the overall tension of the bed. But would not it be better to finish the top cross asap, perhaps after tensioning the 3rd cross and clamping it on the opposite side of the hoop? (Personally, I prefer to get the Starting Clamp off the frame asap.)
You can go back and tie off the top cross any time your clamps allow you to. I've never had any issues with the starting clamp slipping. If I'm not mistaken all the pressure from the 2nd and beyond cross aren't directly 100% applied to the top cross since the strings go around the frame/grommets.

I have a Neos 1000 so I can't even get a clamp back to the top cross until about 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down the head so I just do it at the end. I've done probably 30-40 racquets like this and never had an issue. I'm not opposed to tying it off as soon as you can though.
 
Why complete all the crosses before going back to the top cross and finishing the job? There is a small risk the Starting Clamp might slip. The longer the Starting Clamp is in play the more chance it will slip. I understand if it slips it will probably make little difference to the overall tension of the bed. But would not it be better to finish the top cross asap, perhaps after tensioning the 3rd cross and clamping it on the opposite side of the hoop? (Personally, I prefer to get the Starting Clamp off the frame asap.)
If the starting clamp is going to slip it will slip when you pull tension. The chance of it slipping as you work you way down the frame is very small. But OTOH there is a good chance you could knock the starting clamp off if there are people walking around or if you catch the string with the string. More often than not I leave the clamp on until I finish the crosses, but I don’t think it’s a good idea. I also don’t like having only one clamp hold the crosses while revmoving the starting clamp either. Good reason to string 1 piece but that’s not always a good idea either.
 

Dags

Professional
Why complete all the crosses before going back to the top cross and finishing the job?
It's mostly a rhythm thing for me; once I start the crosses, I like to keep going. I think that helps with my consistency, and the risk is small enough that I'm happy to take it. I might reevaluate if I ever found myself stringing in a shop or busy tournament stringing room. Or if I had cats.
 
If the starting clamp is going to slip it will slip when you pull tension. The chance of it slipping as you work you way down the frame is very small. But OTOH there is a good chance you could knock the starting clamp off if there are people walking around or if you catch the string with the string. More often than not I leave the clamp on until I finish the crosses, but I don’t think it’s a good idea. I also don’t like having only one clamp hold the crosses while revmoving the starting clamp either. Good reason to string 1 piece but that’s not always a good idea either.
Yes! When I said "slip" I meant being "knocked off". I thought that was obvious because it is normally the STRING that slips, NOT the Starting Clamp.

It's mostly a rhythm thing for me; once I start the crosses, I like to keep going. I think that helps with my consistency
Fair enough. Looks like we have different "rhythms". My rhythm is to tie off the top cross after I've tensioned the 3rd Cross. It gives me a short "breather" before I get stuck into to doing the bulk of the crosses. I take the opportunity to check that my weaving is sound to that point as well.
 

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I feel like I've topped out, and even going backwards.
Just did another one in 1:06
(1:11 if you count removing strings and mounting the racket)

Open & Cut string (got tangled)
4 mins
I can totally relate to this depending on what strings you are using. I think the best technique so far I've seen is to insert the set onto the handle and slowly unreel it onto the floor. Then grab the two ends and find the middle. The other way would be to have a 20' long string or figure a way to easily measure off 20' and cut if you are doing 2-piece.
Line up 2 center mains (even length)
6 mins.
I'm not sure I follow you here. You should be feeding from top 2 center holes and grab the ends at the bottom and pull through and it should be even? No? If you are spending time finding the two holes, then why not take a marker and mark the center so you can easily find the holes?
String left side of Mains (Parnell knot)
15 mins

String right side of Mains
24 mins.
Not sure why the significant difference in time for right side vs left side. But then again, I've never strung on a machine with floating clamps. But even so, seems very odd.
Do first cross.
Tie starting knot
Tension to tighten knot
Deal with 2 blocked grommets
32 mins.
I typically leave my (fixed) clamps on the mains even after I tie off. That leaves some slack for me to feed my first cross. Maybe on babolat, it's different. For my son's racquet, I can usually dip the main string down a bit and feed the cross through. You can use a cutter to get a clean wedge on the end of the string and that can help feed it through. Sometimes when it's a tight fit through a grommet, I lick the end of the string to lube it a bit.

If that doesn't work, then I have a hollow awl. Poke it through the grommet, then pull the point back and there is a cavity for you to insert your string and pull the tool back out of the grommet with the string.

Finish weaving crosses
Tie last Parnell knot
1:06

The first cross takes me 8 mins.
This includes tying the knot.
I even prevented the blocked the grommets for the first cross.
But, the two blocked grommets still slow things down.

I tried leaving a string in place. Didn't work for me. The hollow awl is the trick.

My stringing machine came with an awl and hollow awl. I use those a lot. I use the awl to help increase the size of the grommet hole sometimes; especially if I've installed a new grommet set.

I did pick up a starting clamp and that is a wonder tool I use all the time. Also picked a good set of cutters to trim string and also cut a nice clean wedge on the end of the string.

BTW, I have not learned how to tie any other knot other than the double half hitch. But I've yet to run into a racquet stringing that has stopped me from completing a good job.
 
String left side of Mains (Parnell knot)
15 mins

String right side of Mains
24 mins.

Do first cross.
Tie starting knot
Tension to tighten knot
Deal with 2 blocked grommets
32 mins.
Stringing the mains that have no blocked holes, fewer strings, and no weaving takes you 8 min longer than stringing the crosses when you have blocked holes? You need to check your sun dial, did someone kick it over?
 
The OP only seems to want to cut down time stringing and can care less about the quality of stringing. When I asked about his stringing all mains on one side then going to opposite side he could care less. He should learn proper procedures before attempting to cut his time down. The OP would fit right in at a big box stores where I have seen some terrible stringing practices.
@Irvin is correct as OP time on mains is longer than cross strings, and that makes me wonder exactly how truthful the op is or how accurate his stopwatch is. Very ? thread IMO.
Then again, maybe Irvin is right and OP used a kicked over sundial.
 
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I average about 17 minutes for 2 piece. When I really am going speedy I can get it at about 14-15 minutes.

One day I hope to string on tour. I used to string for a local college here. Would have to string 6-12 racquets on most days. Full poly. Boy that was fun.
Hi I have a couple of weave questions for you if you don't mind..

1) when you weave do you always hold onto the end of the string you're weaving with? If so, how do you hold it in such a way without it ever get tied up with the machine? (I'm speaking from a gamma crank perspective).

2) Say you're stringing 16x19 pattern 2-piece. How deep in the crosses do you go before you start weaving deeper, with string going more in and more out?...IF this makes sense?
 
When weaving crosses, I try to go towards the throat until I am past the center mains. Then I start back towards the tip. Only time this is a problem is the last crosses near the bottom, when they're hard weaves.

I also hang on to the tip of the cross until I have pulled all the string thru [leaving any slack if needed], then insert the end into the next grommet hole so I do not have to search for it. :D
 
Hi I have a couple of weave questions for you if you don't mind..

1) when you weave do you always hold onto the end of the string you're weaving with? If so, how do you hold it in such a way without it ever get tied up with the machine? (I'm speaking from a gamma crank perspective).

2) Say you're stringing 16x19 pattern 2-piece. How deep in the crosses do you go before you start weaving deeper, with string going more in and more out?...IF this makes sense?
I do not think it really much matters if you hold the tip or the string in your finger or not, whatever you prefer is fine. Sometimes when I push weave ihold the tip of the the string and some times I don't and I can't really tell much difference. When weaving string thought I always, always, always weave one ahead. When weaving a cross (one ahead) it is important that the next string to be tensioned be as close to the last tensioned string as possible. If it is not it will hold the high strings low and the low strings high. Weaving a soft SG or Multi it does not much matter but if you are weaving a poly with high friction it makes a big difference.
 
When weaving a cross (one ahead) it is important that the next string to be tensioned be as close to the last tensioned string as possible.
@Irvin, please elaborate? Do you mean that the next string to be tensioned be held as close as possible to the last tensioned cross while pulling tension on that string?
 
Thank You @Irvin. A simple "Yes" would have sufficed. However your video makes it perfectly clear.

How I wish I could weave crosses as quickly as you do manually. Oh Well, the cross stringing tool might take a little longer but it is a lot less frustrating for me.

Also, I notice when you clamp the cross strings you place the string clamp as close to the tension head as possible.

When I do that I get a little more draw-back compared to clamping one main string further away from the hoop. The outside main string (in my case Main #8) does not seem to support the clamp as much as the next main (main #7) does. I seem to get less draw back when I clamp the cross one main string further away from the tension head. This seems to give me more consistent string jobs each time.
 
That weave is how I weave a non-poly I pull weave poly most of the time and it is a little slower but not much. Weaving one ahead and having the next string to be tensioned pulled up as high toward the tip is the big secret. That leaves an open channel in the mains for the cross to go through.

It really does not matter on my machine how close or far away I am from the frame the drawback is usually very small on that machine. I have a video showing that I’ll try to find. But on the subsequent pull all drawback is pulled out anyway so it does not matter. I try to place clamp as close as I can to the frame but I the same time I try to maintain minimum distortion on the outer mains (and crosses) as I am stringing.
 
+1
for me the longest part about tying the not, is cutting off the excess string (if any), to be able to weave the knot more easily.
i'm presuming you're using a needle nose plier or something to tighten it?
and you're tightening it by pulling it down?
or are you trying to be perfect by pulling up all slack from the last main or cross? (pro tip (which i don't follow, because i just don't care that much, nor do i think it makes that much of a difference), when weaving the last main or cross, increase tension by 5-10lbs to compensate for the inevitable slack in the line))

just realized, that sometimes it is a pain to thread string through grommets (that have shared strings) when the grommets are new (ie. you might need an awl to widen the grommet hole), especially if you're using 15g string.
Didn't read the entire thread so sorry if already mentioned. Just a tip I do for cutting poly ends for shared tie off holes. Use some nail clippers or an exacto and cut the string as length wise as you can so it tapers nicely (like the taper for an overgrip) This will usually allow enough to pass through and be grabbed by a pair of needle nose pliers, or allow you to push through with the pliers.
 
I've now done about 20 string jobs.
My time with a drop weight is now down to about 50 mins.
Personal record is 47 mins. (Not counting string removal and mounting)

Picked up a few tips from the local tennis store guy. (I watched him string)
  • Instead of uncoiling the entire pack, I uncoil while measuring out 9 racket lengths. Make 2 steps into 1.
  • While doing crosses, I thread the grommet as part of the weave. Never occurred to me. I’d weave it to the end of the main, flip the racket, and then thread the final grommet as a separate step.
  • I also stopped tightening the knots loop with pliers (usually damage the string, as well). Now, I just hand tighten the loop and only pull the string thru with pliers. This saves a bit.
  • I also stopped using the awl to slide strings to prevent burn-in while pulling thru the crosses. Now, I just use fingers. Saves time grabbing for awl every cross. This works best with 17ga.
 
52 minutes (inc. 4 mins for string removal and mounting)
So, the TTW time is 48 mins.

I hand tightened the knots this time.
Yank loop with fingers, then yank end of string, and then a light tug with pliers.

Also, used fingers to fan the strings.
 

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Hall of Fame
52 minutes (inc. 4 mins for string removal and mounting)
So, the TTW time is 48 mins.

I hand tightened the knots this time.
Yank loop with fingers, then yank end of string, and then a light tug with pliers.

Also, used fingers to fan the strings.
Nice work. I think I'm at about 45min from start to finish. I have a little over 100 stringings.

I don't use pliers for tightening the knot. But I do use a starting clamp. It's sitting handy in the tool tray and to me, it's actually faster to use it than to hand tighten. Since it self-clamps, I just open it, slip the string in and let go. Then I have an easy grip on the string.
 
Nice work. I think I'm at about 45min from start to finish. I have a little over 100 stringings.

I don't use pliers for tightening the knot. But I do use a starting clamp. It's sitting handy in the tool tray and to me, it's actually faster to use it than to hand tighten. Since it self-clamps, I just open it, slip the string in and let go. Then I have an easy grip on the string.
Be really really careful using a starting clamp to tighten knots. Unless you loop the knot tail around the jaws of the clamp the string can slip. You don't want to end up with a starting clamp shaped welt on your face or worse.

Personally, I have tried the hand tightening method and find the result just as effective as using a starting clamp. I think a lot of stringers feel the need to over-tighten knots when it is not going to make a difference in many cases.
 
I hand tightened the knots this time.
Yank loop with fingers, then yank end of string, and then a light tug with pliers.
If you’ve tightened the knot by hand there is no need to use a pair of pliers. The first half hitch (believe it or not) is what holds the end of the string that second loop is used for tucking away the end so it looks neat. If you pull hard enough on the tag end to put any real pressure on the half hitch you WiLL break the string. If you don’t break the string you’re not pulling hard enough to tighten the knot. So why use pliers (or a starting clamp?) I use a starting clamp because I do not want to use my hand, but you’d probably be surprised how easy I pull.
 

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If you’ve tightened the knot by hand there is no need to use a pair of pliers. The first half hitch (believe it or not) is what holds the end of the string that second loop is used for tucking away the end so it looks neat. If you pull hard enough on the tag end to put any real pressure on the half hitch you WiLL break the string. If you don’t break the string you’re not pulling hard enough to tighten the knot. So why use pliers (or a starting clamp?) I use a starting clamp because I do not want to use my hand, but you’d probably be surprised how easy I pull.
Irvin, I've watched a bunch of your videos where you talk about the different tensions and your testing of the starting clamps holding ability. So I have good confidence that it can hold any little tension I pull with.

@Karma Tennis, I probably use less than 10# of tension when tying my double half hitch. I mainly use the clamp because I don't want to be holding onto a 17g string and pulling much tension at all (I have cut myself as a kid reeling up a fishing line with my bare hands and having the fish run on me and cut my fingers so I have a slight phobia about it). I hold the clamp with the string coming out between my index and middle finger. It's mainly for comfort rather than getting a lot of purchase on it.

I tension away from me to snug up the string on the outside of the frame. Then quickly tug towards my chest to snug the knot. I give a couple more tugs and then run my second half hitch. This time, I just need to tug towards my chest since I don't have to pull up any slack.

This is enough to hold my knot securely. But gentle enough to not break nat gut or Zyex.
 
Richard Parnell hand pulling tie-off knot

EDIT: TTW does not save the time stamps: @870s (14m30s), @948s (15m48s)
@TimeToPlaySets - slow down the playback from the gear icon on the video (lower right)
 
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Be really really careful using a starting clamp to tighten knots. Unless you loop the knot tail around the jaws of the clamp the string can slip. You don't want to end up with a starting clamp shaped welt on your face or worse.

Personally, I have tried the hand tightening method and find the result just as effective as using a starting clamp. I think a lot of stringers feel the need to over-tighten knots when it is not going to make a difference in many cases.
With soft string I hand pull, but with stiff wiry poly, I'll use a starting clamp. As far as string slipping and whacking yourself in the face, that's why I hold the clamp by the jaws and not the handles when tightening knots. It's much more controlled, there is VERY little chance of the string ever slipping (you are not going to open the clamp a little accidentally), and you have your fist covering the clamp if somehow you do manage to really goof and punch yourself in the face.
 
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Just did it in 49 minutes.
This does not include string removal and mounting racket.

I'm tying all knots with my fingers now.
I also increased tension by 3lbs for the outside mains. (and last cross)

My weaving technique still basically sucks.

Someone gave a tip to never let go of the end of the string when weaving crosses, but I can't seem to do that with a drop weight .
 
I place a rubber band around my watch, and when I am done weaving a row, I place end of string under the rubber band. This way you can easily get the end of the string. I use this technique as when you push the string under the rubber band you do not hit into you arm with string end. If you know where the end is, it speeds up process.
 

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My weaving technique still basically sucks.
This is where to shave off the time. Improve your weaving. I think the step that Irvine talked about, pushing the last weave up against the tensioned string and weaving one ahead helps.

I found trimming the end of the string with an angle cut also helps. Having fingers that are clean and not oily or slippery helps.

I actually thread the entire string through my fingers until I find the end and I'm stringing in 30min.

My next time savings would be to use a linear pull machine vs dw.
 
Just did it in 49 minutes.
...........
Someone gave a tip to never let go of the end of the string when weaving crosses, but I can't seem to do that with a drop weight .
here is a tip thats helped me alot,,
used it on my klippermate years ago

I call it the scorpion tail cross weaving technique,, :D
it helps me keep track of the end of the string
it looks like a scorpions tail while you do other stuff,,
I leave about 4-7" extra as a tail

when weaving the crosses,, I weave it and DonoT insert the string on the grommet until im ready to start fanning the next cross
as I said, it lets me keep track of that end (tail) at all times,,
 
When I first started stringing, the first 5-10 racquets would take 1.5-2 hours on a table top crank machine. 300 racquets later, and an upgrade to a constant pull has my average time down to ~25 minutes. Cutting strings and prepping new strings takes about 5 minutes. Tying knots initially took FOREVER, until I watched numerous knot tying videos (shout out to @Irvin 's YT channel) until my eyes bleed, made tying the parnell and starting knots second nature.

I still dread 18x20 string patterns with 1.30 or larger poly. Doing a 89.5 inc Prestige Mid with ALU Rough full bed probably adds 10 minutes to the my overall time.

However, as others have mentioned, I have always focused on being as consistent as possible with the process so that my results are predictable. That trumps speed in all situations.
 

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I do weave one ahead.
I do trim the end to bevel.

I'm not going to go beyond the DW.
That's a whole different level I'm not reaching.
I think your weaving technique will slowly improve if you stick with a solid method. You're re-stringing every other week, so should get plenty of practice.

Besides, 1hr every other week for fresh strings is not bad. It takes me a lot longer to drive to the pro shop to drop off my racquet and come home. Then I have to do it again to pick it up.
 
You can't weave the next cross until you thread the grommet.
Yes, but,,,,
When doing 1 ahead, you dont need to finish crossing both strings,, at least i dont,,
the second, or the "1ahead", is the one I dont finish,
I weave the string across, but I dont insert the end through the grommet,, "yet ",
I leave this tail where I can see it, and get to it quickly,
because of the cross friction and the little extra length (I used to weave it), when I leave it, it looks like a tail sticking up (most of the time),,
I go back to the previous untension cross, tension, clamp,
that finishes that cross,,
ill then go finish the 1ahead cross, pull/fan, straighten, weave 1 ahead and stop short of inserting into grommet again

and so on,,
 
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Yes, but,,,,
When doing 1 ahead, you dont need to finish crossing both strings,, at least i dont,,
the second, or the "1ahead", is the one I dont finish,
I weave the string across, but I dont insert the end through the grommet,, "yet ",
I leave this tail where I can see it, and get to it quickly,
because of the cross friction and the little extra length (I used to weave it), when I leave it, it looks like a tail sticking up (most of the time),,
I go back to the previous untension cross, tension, clamp,
that finishes that cross,,
ill then go finish the 1ahead cross, pull/fan, straighten, weave 1 ahead and stop short of inserting into grommet again

and so on,,
I prefer to pull most of the strings slack one ahead as well, leaving just enough string to reach tension head, as this way it is less wear on the strings.
That is why I place string end under the wrist band as I know just where the end of string is to save time.
 
Ok, I think I get it.

My way:
1) Put 1 ahead thru the grommet
2) Pull string
3) Tension

Scorpion way:
1) Put 1 ahead almost to grommet
2) Tension
3) Put 1 ahead thru the grommet
4a) Pull string
4b) Thread next cross
 
Richard Parnell hand pulling tie-off knot
@TimeToPlaySets
on this video provided by @jwocky , richard parnell does something slightly similar, yet different
He however, threads both crosses, but leaves the end slightly longer on the otherside,,
he never looses sight of the end cord,,
The end cord is waiting for him threaded on the 1ahead, ready to be pulled/weaved when he gets back to it,,

my way, I prefer to focus on 1 thing at a time,
"weave and leave",, haaa
I preferred to do it this way, because threading the grommet is sometimes a tricky ordeal, and cost me a few more seconds,, specially in low light situations
ill come back and focus on threading the end on the grommet and fanning that cross entirely on the next step,,,

Btw. Richard parnell is a world class stringer, copying him would be my advise,, but I like to do things my way, it makes sense to me, if you try both ways, you decide,, or come up with your own way..

btw @jim e , a long time ago, I also tried the rubber band trick
 
I don't see what you're talking about.
He weaves one cross at a time, like anyone else.
He is not skipping grommets
Watch his left hand. He holds on to the end of the string after he has weaved one ahead and tensions the previous cross while still holding onto the end of the string. He does not have to search for the end of the string when he goes to weave the next cross. Simple and saves you several seconds for every cross if you are used to searching for the end of the string.
 
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