C10 Pro review - do ppl agree with this?

Ross K

Legend
I read this yesterday and, having spent some time with the C10 over the years, this really stood out for me in a few respects, and made me think about a few things - and not just about the frame in question (2012 C10 BTW) but also about the generality of reviews and how nice it is to have reviewers being a tad more specific or firmly stating considered opinions.

I have a few follow up queries, but first I just want to know - do people actually agree with this, and especially the points I've underlined?



The Pitch
Once the racquet of choice for touring pro Petr Korda, the Völkl C10 Pro is celebrating its 15th anniversary. As when it was released, the classic player’s frame features Twin Absorber technology, a two-part foam handle that reduces torsional shock and dampens vibrations on impact, according to the company. Much firmer than Volkl’s game-improvement handles, the Twin Absorber palette (as well as the racquet’s hoop) is designed to “give” on mishit shots. The result, Volkl says, is a unique cradling feel for the ball.

How It Tested
Despite its retro, bare-bones technology, playtesters complimented the C10 Pro on its crisp feel and well-controlled power while serving but especially at the baseline. Said one 4.5 playtester with a semi-Western forehand and two-handed backhand, “The frame has great balance, and I really like the weight and the way that the ball pops off of the racquet. It had great control, and I felt like I could really swing away [on the baseline] without hitting the ball deep.” Playtesters also praised the C10’s prowess at the net, noting its solid stability and quick maneuverability, as well as its classic ball pocketing and touch.

If there was one knock on the C10 Pro, it was its average spin production. Some players with extreme Western grips claimed that, due to the stick’s more traditional, oblong head shape, their highly vertical swings produced more mishits than was typical, which limited their RPMs. As such, the C10 is best suited for traditional doubles players, or for singles players who hit relatively flat and who center their games around forceful all-court play or net rushing.

How It Looks
Has anyone else ever mistook Volkl’s insignia for a mirrored Star Trek emblem? Also, it’s not everyday you get to play a stick in safety yellow. Message: Caution, real player approaching.

The Bottom Line
Befitting a hefty, head-light stick, the C10 Pro works best for long-swinging players with non-extreme grips who tend to miss stern to bow, rather than port to starboard.
 

McLovin

Legend
I used the 2008 version of the C-10 Pro for a year which, as I understand it, is the exact same thing as the 2012 version.

My game resembles Ferrers more than anyone's, and I had absolutely no problem playing with this frame...until it got to the 3rd set and my shoulder became fatigued...but that is a different story.

Likewise, after moving to the X Force Pro, I sold my C10s to a friend of mine who hits more topspin than I do, and he's been playing some of his best tennis of late. Whether that is due to the racquet, I don't know, but he's certainly not playing worse with it.
 

McLovin

Legend
I do agree with the 'stern to bow, rather than port to starboard' comment, though. This is something I've felt about my last 3 frames (M-Comp 95, C10 Pro and X Force Pro): If I can keep it between the sidelines & over the net, the ball is going in.
 

momolabs

New User
As an aside I noticed last night that on Chris' play tester profile here at TW, it now lists this C10 pro 2012 stick vs the PB10 Mid he switched to earlier. Would like to hear from him about that.
 

Tommyj

Rookie
As an aside I noticed last night that on Chris' play tester profile here at TW, it now lists this C10 pro 2012 stick vs the PB10 Mid he switched to earlier. Would like to hear from him about that.
According to Chris's profile he seems to be switching around quite a bit lately: PB10 Mid to Prestige Youtek IG MP to Slazenger, and now the C10.
 

falc02

New User
Hi Everyone,

I was wondering if anyone could compare this racquet to either the Dunlop Bio300T, Donnay Platinum 99 and Head Radical IG Pro (racquets I have tried recently)

I am specifically interested in its power level.

Cheers,
FALC
 

latershow

Rookie
If there was one knock on the C10 Pro, it was its average spin production. Some players with extreme Western grips claimed that, due to the stick’s more traditional, oblong head shape, their highly vertical swings produced more mishits than was typical, which limited their RPMs. As such, the C10 is best suited for traditional doubles players, or for singles players who hit relatively flat and who center their games around forceful all-court play or net rushing.
I completely disagree with this, for a couple of reasons.

Firstly, I play with the C10 Pro and while it is not my main racket, I know it well enough to conclude that spin production is good to excellent, at least for me. I play with a semi to full western grip (depends on whether I'm playing on grass or clay), and this grip does not inhibit me in any way at all to acheive great spin production with this racket. The C10 Pro can create mind blowing spin, believe me!

Secondly, I disagree that oblong head shapes inhibit spin production. Spin generation is more a function of the racket flex, beam width, and string pattern than head shape. I occasionally play with the Fischer Vacuum 90, probably the most well known oblong shaped racket in existence, and can easily generate huge biting topspin with my extreme forehand grip.

Simply put, the C10 Pro is a capable, indeed highly suitable, racket to extreme grips due to its nice flex, narrow 20mm beam width, and open string pattern.
 

Kevin T

Hall of Fame
I completely disagree with this, for a couple of reasons.

Firstly, I play with the C10 Pro and while it is not my main racket, I know it well enough to conclude that spin production is good to excellent, at least for me. I play with a semi to full western grip (depends on whether I'm playing on grass or clay), and this grip does not inhibit me in any way at all to acheive great spin production with this racket. The C10 Pro can create mind blowing spin, believe me!

Secondly, I disagree that oblong head shapes inhibit spin production. Spin generation is more a function of the racket flex, beam width, and string pattern than head shape. I occasionally play with the Fischer Vacuum 90, probably the most well known oblong shaped racket in existence, and can easily generate huge biting topspin with my extreme forehand grip.

Simply put, the C10 Pro is a capable, indeed highly suitable, racket to extreme grips due to its nice flex, narrow 20mm beam width, and open string pattern.
Agree 100%. I hit the best kick serves of my life with the oblong Head Prestige and Fischer Vac 90. Never had an issue on groundstrokes either. The flex of the C10 was never my cup of tea but I owned one for a brief time and never had an issue with spin generation.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Agree 100%. I hit the best kick serves of my life with the oblong Head Prestige and Fischer Vac 90. Never had an issue on groundstrokes either. The flex of the C10 was never my cup of tea but I owned one for a brief time and never had an issue with spin generation.
+2

The C10 is an absolute spin machine.
 

Ross K

Legend
Interesting stuff... I had a few different responses...

This I completely agree with (especially re how it swings):
Despite its retro, bare-bones technology, playtesters complimented the C10 Pro on its crisp feel and well-controlled power while serving but especially at the baseline. Said one 4.5 playtester with a semi-Western forehand and two-handed backhand, “The frame has great balance, and I really like the weight and the way that the ball pops off of the racquet. It had great control, and I felt like I could really swing away [on the baseline] without hitting the ball deep.” Playtesters also praised the C10’s prowess at the net, noting its solid stability and quick maneuverability, as well as its classic ball pocketing and touch.
This, however, surprised me a bit (I always found it positively whippy with nice spin), and made me wonder if I'd not quite realized quite who this frame is intended for (ie, not for players like me who are b-line spin players):
If there was one knock on the C10 Pro, it was its average spin production. Some players with extreme Western grips claimed that, due to the stick’s more traditional, oblong head shape, their highly vertical swings produced more mishits than was typical, which limited their RPMs. As such, the C10 is best suited for traditional doubles players, or for singles players who hit relatively flat and who center their games around forceful all-court play or net rushing.
On a different note though, I appreciated that this wasn't the usual "great from the back-court, great for more all court" generalities which so many reviews state. I may not agree fully with the reviewer (actually, I'm a bit confused, maybe he's right and has hit upon why this frame doesn't quite suit me - virtually everything he says re playing doubles, all court, flat hitters - none of that applies to me, LOL), but I liked how he stated his considered opinion. Furthermore, I think it would be so nice if reviewers could say quite categorically what kind of game/style particular frames would suit as opposed to general musings... even if we disagree, it's nice to see more pronounced, clearly stated observations... IMO.
 

Kevin T

Hall of Fame
Interesting stuff... I had a few different responses...

This I completely agree with (especially re how it swings):

This, however, surprised me a bit (I always found it positively whippy with nice spin), and made me wonder if I'd not quite realized quite who this frame is intended for (ie, not for players like me who are b-line spin players):

On a different note though, I appreciated that this wasn't the usual "great from the back-court, great for more all court" generalities which so many reviews state. I may not agree fully with the reviewer (actually, I'm a bit confused, maybe he's right and has hit upon why this frame doesn't quite suit me - virtually everything he says re playing doubles, all court, flat hitters - none of that applies to me, LOL), but I liked how he stated his considered opinion. Furthermore, I think it would be so nice if reviewers could say quite categorically what kind of game/style particular frames would suit as opposed to general musings... even if we disagree, it's nice to see more pronounced, clearly stated observations... IMO.
Whippy is a perfect way to describe the C10, Ross. I used to liken it to a lacrosse stick....the ball pocketed so deeply I felt like I was catching, then throwing the ball back across the net. :) I was coming from a PS 6.0 95 and the difference in flex was significant.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
Ross your post is so well written that I can picture you frothing at the mouth and battling a serious case of racquetaholic frenzy setting in.

Excellent work.

I bet the c10 pro is awesome, probably a little demanding in the summer, but looks nice.

I will add that while my yonex is rather similar to this, I do think the wider face does make it a little more forgiving, especially if you play on clay a lot like I do. So this may be a situation where you need to take surface into account.
 

crosscourt

Professional
I wouldn't have said that it had a crisp feeling, but it is a while since I hit one. Maybe the more recent iterations play differently.
 

crosscourt

Professional
The TW specs say the C10 Pro is a "low - medium" powered racket. That puts it in the same place as the PDR. That doesnt seem quite right to me either.

cc
 
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