Calling Switch on lobs

Lightweight

New User
In doubles - when one player is up and the other back and the opponent lobs the ball kind of in the middle but a little more on the net person's side of the court, who should call switch?, if anyone?
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
Whoever recognizes the situation first. If the net guy knows right away he can't get it, he should yell, "YOU!" or "YOURS!" or "SWITCH!" whichever works best. If the back player thinks he has a better play on the ball, he should yell, "MINE!" or "I GOT IT!" or "SWITCH!" whichever works best.
 

Jd1boo

Rookie
I think as as soon as the net player recognizes they are not going to be able to get to the ball they need to call switch and move to cover the opposite side. Not sure if you are asking who is to place blame on for a failed switch but either player could theoretically make the call, its jus that the net player has priority if they can make a play on the ball.
 

Dragy

Legend
Basically net player makes the choice adjusting his position, back person plays the ball and covers the rest. By default net player positions himself at the other side of the court, opposite to where the lob landed. If in the middle, you can consider which side is more advantageous for your baseline player. For example, you may switch to leave him straight opening and play FH to opponent’s backhand (for righties, playing in deuce court against an opponent at the baseline in ad court may be better than staying in ad CC position).
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Basically net player makes the choice adjusting his position, back person plays the ball and covers the rest. By default net player positions himself at the other side of the court, opposite to where the lob landed. If in the middle, you can consider which side is more advantageous for your baseline player. For example, you may switch to leave him straight opening and play FH to opponent’s backhand (for righties, playing in deuce court against an opponent at the baseline in ad court may be better than staying in ad CC position).
I agree with this thinking, but I also sometimes encourage doubles teams to let the partner at the baseline "quarterback" the net player's position by calling perhaps "switch", "stay right", etc.

When the ball goes over the net player, a switch usually doesn't need to be called because that player's partner needs to go behind that net player to hit the ball. But this gets tricky when the incoming lob isn't decisively headed to one half of the court or the other. Doubs teams can sometimes trick themselves into the dreaded "I formation" when the lob is directed somewhere near the middle of the back court.

Since the baseline player knows where he/she is going to hit the ball - that incoming lob - that player can also direct the partner up at net to the better side if the team has enough skill to play one shot ahead. You don't need to be a 5.0 killer to be able to do that and the player at the baseline has the luxury of having all the action on the court in front of him/her. Easy to read what's going on from back there.
 

Dragy

Legend
I agree with this thinking, but I also sometimes encourage doubles teams to let the partner at the baseline "quarterback" the net player's position by calling perhaps "switch", "stay right", etc.

When the ball goes over the net player, a switch usually doesn't need to be called because that player's partner needs to go behind that net player to hit the ball. But this gets tricky when the incoming lob isn't decisively headed to one half of the court or the other. Doubs teams can sometimes trick themselves into the dreaded "I formation" when the lob is directed somewhere near the middle of the back court.

Since the baseline player knows where he/she is going to hit the ball - that incoming lob - that player can also direct the partner up at net to the better side if the team has enough skill to play one shot ahead. You don't need to be a 5.0 killer to be able to do that and the player at the baseline has the luxury of having all the action on the court in front of him/her. Easy to read what's going on from back there.
Well, being at net I prefer to judge myself, and to crouch if I feel my position might interfere with my teammate shot. I suppose we could communicate in such a way after some practice... but that “switch” shout may also communicate intended shot direction to opponents, no?
I also suppose it may be more important against “2 back” opponents setup. Against 1 up, 1 back it’s pretty obvious where your teammate will be hitting, unless opponents are I formatted/netman poaching... well, doubles have lots of entertaining variety, need flexible approach.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I always call it as the net person, so my baseline partner knows to stay put after hitting the reply and doesn't have to worry about hitting the shot and "QB"ing the position changes.

And, on another note, I hate "Yours" as a call in doubles. If the partner doesn't know it's theirs, a sudden "Yours" shout isn't going to help them get to the ball and hit it. I prefer partners to play "Murphy's Law" tennis. Your partner will always miss the ball. Every opponents ball will land in. Your opponent will get every one of your "winners" and "aces" back. If you play by those assumptions you will always be on your toes and ready.
 

Big Bagel

Professional
I would say that if the ball is somewhat in the middle then the back person, the one hitting the ball, should call out "switch" or "stay" to let their teammate at the net know what to do. That way they have complete control of where to hit the ball and what to do after their shot without having to worry about what their partner is doing. The person hitting the ball should be able to decide what to do and what shot they're comfortable with hitting in that situation.
 

Kevo

Legend
Whoever makes a decision to switch sides calls it, especially if the know their partner might not notice the switch.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
In doubles - when one player is up and the other back and the opponent lobs the ball kind of in the middle but a little more on the net person's side of the court, who should call switch?, if anyone?
Guy on the back should run forward and call "MINE" and take it out of the air and smash it at the netguy on the opposing team. or if their netguy is in good position and have lightening quick reflexes then just smash up the middle hard. and Stay ready and alert just in case, they get the ball back.
 

Off The Wall

Semi-Pro
I’ll assume a defensive lob. Net guy should switch back to the service line. Partner should notice. If that scenario is too advanced, Basically, whoever sees what’s happening first should direct the other.
 
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