Can I play the best tennis of my life with a 200g?

Trickster

Rookie
I'm currently a 5.0 player in training for national level over 35s in my country.

I'm currently playing with V3 TC 95 by Angell but I have always liked the feel of the Dunlop Max 200g but haven't played with it extensively.

Would it be suicide for my tennis to switch? Could I really play the best tennis of my life with a max 200g or should I stick with a more modern frame?

My game is aggressive net rushing, heavy slices, but have an all court game too.


Your guidance welcome
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
I read this in the latest post column and thought you wanted to play with a 200 grams racquet! LOL

There are many negatives to using an old racquet. Material fatigue, regrooving timing and swing to accommodate the older racquet etc etc. Of course, if you enjoy the feel and how you play, regardless of score, then go for it. But as a competitive strategy, I don't think any coach would advise a racquet change so close to the beginning of a season. Maybe if it gave you extra pace on the serve, which alleviates service hold worries. I'm guessing the 200g doesn't do anything like that.
Arguably the most talented player ever to hold a racquet told 1.5 years to fully adapt a racquet change, and his real results came only 3 years later, when he could match physically to the new power and had a powerhouse 17-18 season. Even Djoker couldn't adapt to a new racquet to take stress off his arm quickly. If you think you can, have at it. But I wouldn't consider it!
 

NicoMK

Professional
Try to play with it extensively to see how it really feels and how your arm react to a heavier frame. If you like it and perform well with it, then stick with it. Who cares if it's old stuff?
 
Of course you can. This racket is perfect for playing classic offensive tennis. IMO is a golden age to do that kind of game because opponents are not used to countering it.
I continue to use it to devastating effect against players much younger than me. Of course you have to use it by shortening the points to the maximum and doing S/V. This and other classic rackets are fully competitive if used correctly: they were not designed to run a physical marathon at every point. Try it.
 

yonexRx32

Semi-Pro
I'm currently a 5.0 player in training for national level over 35s in my country.

I'm currently playing with V3 TC 95 by Angell but I have always liked the feel of the Dunlop Max 200g but haven't played with it extensively.

Would it be suicide for my tennis to switch? Could I really play the best tennis of my life with a max 200g or should I stick with a more modern frame?

My game is aggressive net rushing, heavy slices, but have an all court game too.


Your guidance welcome

The Dunlop Max 200g is my favorite racquet. No other racket comes close to the feel of the Max 200g. Strung with natural gut in the mains and synthetic gut in the crosses it is simply sublime. It is the only racket that I could pick up after suffering elbow tendinitis from playing too much with the Prince Diablo (an amazingly accurate racket, by the way, but that killed my elbow for about a year).

Yeah, you could win matches with the Max 200g, but only after you get used to the weight, small head and dense string pattern. Your tennis will definitely improve from playing with the Max exclusively for about a year. You may win matches right away, if your serve is splendid and your net game above average. Otherwise, prepare to get crushed for a while while heavy spin players have their way with you.
 

retrowagen

Hall of Fame
Training exclusively with this racquet will make you a better player. It will clearly identify bad technique, and force you to replace it with better strokes. It requires accuracy and precision, and rewards it. In short, it can filter the “garbage” out of your game, if your training is consistent and you already play at a fairly high level.
 

Frankc

Professional
The obvious question as every serious player must ask - what is "the best tennis?" How do you see the you and the game? A fluid style? Variety? Net game? Surface? What makes you grin, simply enough?
Agree with above, a very exacting racquet for special talent. But you gotta have the goods. And a more neutral gripped varied and attacking game...
Precision and accuracy and pure striking - more than a several years ago, saw an ex Davis Cupper singlehandedly take apart a very top ALTA(Atlanta) Open doubles team with precision and mystifying linear control of the ball. Did it by "the Book" - you knew what he would do before he did just that shot - they were helpless. And these were top, recent D1 players. just clinical... We talked before the match as he freshly strung a 200G with Toa Gold nylon. Nice guy and told me how all his friends were on the lookout around the country for more 200Gs...

(As an aside, there was a reference above to heavy spin players "crushing" you for awhile. No disrespect, but unless those "heavy spin players" are of elite regional or above talent, a skillful, varied and more linear game will make them real uncomfortable, real quickly. That tale plays out the same way, all the time, at the very large Metro Tennis Centers where I frequent...)
 
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Trickster

Rookie
Thanks very much for the feedback.

I especially appreciate the comment about the development potential offered by playing with a smaller racket. That's definitely something to be aware of. The comment about the 200g wielding gent beating 2 Div1 college players is also inspiring.

Keep the posts coming guys - looks like I might be trying this out!
 

teachingprotx

Hall of Fame
No absolutely NOT.
few years back a client of mine tried one of my old rackets for fun . He was back then I’d say late 30,s . Married a few children , 20 lbs overweight Swedish turned American as he’d moved here in college years graduated from u t ( Texas ) remained and started his post Uni life. He was a top junior in Sweden but burnt out by 15 and later in life picked it up again , which is where I come in .. one day during a hitting lesson he asked me if he can try my old donnay borg pro junior racket. It is 25 inches in length . But it doesn’t look junior ish at all. A matter of fact he didn’t even know . Anyway he used a Babolat pure storm limited I believe. After playIng with that lil borg stick he fell in love as he didn’t miss with it. He was 6’3 big swede. Strong as an ox too. But I swear he hit for an hour and he missed like twice long.
Anyway he went on to win our club tournament. And some others that year. I have since left that club but still here whispers of him at other state tournies .. still using that borg junior ..
I texted him awhile back to check in ... he had grabbed up a few of those donnays used . Pretty neat
 

michael valek

Professional
Hmm it’s a good plan, tried it myself. Great fun but get used to losing for a long while. Tried it most recently with Yamaha secrets and before that Becker frames and before that Pog and before that Max200g etc etc. Got some Wilson h22 now which blow all of those away Is an h22 old tech or new tech? Or just quality tech? Yes it’s possible to use the old frames but apart from being cool and a talking point they didn’t give me anything extra. National over 35 (in the Uk I guess) is a great level, best for me was over 35 county.
 

socallefty

Legend
It depends on which version you are talking about. I grew up in the Eighties with the one that McEnroe played with - it was 80 sq inches, 12.5 ozs and had stiffness RA below 50. I think it will be very hard to compete at a high level today with a racquet that is so small and has the stiffness of a limp noodle.

if you are talking about the Biomimetic version released in 2012 which was 98 sq inches, 11.8 ozs and RA 62, it should be fine as long as you are used to heavy, flexible racquets. Might need a soft string like natural gut or a hybrid to make it easy to generate some power.
 

big ted

Hall of Fame
Could I really play the best tennis of my life with a max 200g or should I stick with a more modern frame?
interesting question..
i think its possible if it motivates you to practice more...
but does that racquet do anything better than a newer model?
i think the racquet might force you to be more aggressive since older racquets are less suited
to defensive tennis than newer ones.. whether that works in your favor or not... :unsure: :unsure:
 

michael valek

Professional
All being said I dug them out and played singles with the max 200g last night. Serving games were awesome, but took a while to return properly . Great fun though, played in a different way to usual.
 

30T2

New User
As a strong 4.0, I definitely cannot play my best tennis with a 200G. The vintage stick I hit with the most is my Head TXP, which is already far more forgiving than a 200G. As fun as it is, I am not as effective with the TXP as I am with the blades I normally hit with. When things go south in a competitive situation, I want something that I can swing even if I stiffen up or get tired. Lighter modern rackets give me that margin. I think the same logic could apply to a 5.0 player like OP... Either that or 'stiffening up' and 'getting tired' isn't an issue for higher level players the same way it is for 4.0-4.5 level players - in which case, why not make the switch? It sounds like the 200G fits OP's game well.
 

NicoMK

Professional
No absolutely NOT.
few years back a client of mine tried one of my old rackets for fun . He was back then I’d say late 30,s . Married a few children , 20 lbs overweight Swedish turned American as he’d moved here in college years graduated from u t ( Texas ) remained and started his post Uni life. He was a top junior in Sweden but burnt out by 15 and later in life picked it up again , which is where I come in .. one day during a hitting lesson he asked me if he can try my old donnay borg pro junior racket. It is 25 inches in length . But it doesn’t look junior ish at all. A matter of fact he didn’t even know . Anyway he used a Babolat pure storm limited I believe. After playIng with that lil borg stick he fell in love as he didn’t miss with it. He was 6’3 big swede. Strong as an ox too. But I swear he hit for an hour and he missed like twice long.
Anyway he went on to win our club tournament. And some others that year. I have since left that club but still here whispers of him at other state tournies .. still using that borg junior ..
I texted him awhile back to check in ... he had grabbed up a few of those donnays used . Pretty neat
Cool stuff!
 

michael valek

Professional
All being said I dug them out and played singles with the max 200g last night. Serving games were awesome, but took a while to return properly . Great fun though, played in a different way to usual.
Foolishly tried them again today. The answer is no I cannot play my best tennis with a max 200g. Or rather I can play better tennis with a different frame.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I'm currently a 5.0 player in training for national level over 35s in my country.

I'm currently playing with V3 TC 95 by Angell but I have always liked the feel of the Dunlop Max 200g but haven't played with it extensively.

Would it be suicide for my tennis to switch? Could I really play the best tennis of my life with a max 200g or should I stick with a more modern frame?

My game is aggressive net rushing, heavy slices, but have an all court game too.


Your guidance welcome
Absolutely.

The Mag 200g is great for flat shots, slices, and volleys, because its flex is more like a wood racquet but with slightly larger more forgiving head size.

As long as bending the ball with spin is not crucial to your style of play, and you can serve well with flatter serve trajectory, then 200g can be great high-performance frame in the right hands. Mac and Steffi had no problem using it to dominate opponents with modern racquets.
 

frinton

Professional
I can’t really say too much about the 200g, but assuming you’re talking about the McEnroe/ Graf racket from the eighties, I can add 2 things:
one: for a while now I use a PS85 as my main stick and love it! I think playing it has improved my game and technique. While it is a totally different stick compared to the 200g, it is also heavy and small headed compared to today’s state of the art stuff!
two: I do sometimes break out one of my 200gs, usually for doubles! It amazes me time and again what this stick can do... magic volleys I have absolutely no business pulling off! and when I get into the swing I can also play from the baseline alright. And that is usually with the strings that were in the racket when I found it at a thrift store... some of these strings look 20 to 25 years old, easy! Must get one of them strung with my go-to string to see what the racket can really do for me.
So by all means: old & heavy racket does not necessarily mean you can’t play well and successfully. Quite some adjustment time may be required, but you’ll get a blast out of it for sure! Keep us posted how it goes! Give yourself at least a full season.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
The Dunlop Max 200g is my favorite racquet. No other racket comes close to the feel of the Max 200g. Strung with natural gut in the mains and synthetic gut in the crosses it is simply sublime. It is the only racket that I could pick up after suffering elbow tendinitis from playing too much with the Prince Diablo (an amazingly accurate racket, by the way, but that killed my elbow for about a year).

Yeah, you could win matches with the Max 200g, but only after you get used to the weight, small head and dense string pattern. Your tennis will definitely improve from playing with the Max exclusively for about a year. You may win matches right away, if your serve is splendid and your net game above average. Otherwise, prepare to get crushed for a while while heavy spin players have their way with you.
How does the MAX200G compare to your namesake, RX32 or RX37?
 

yonexRx32

Semi-Pro
How does the MAX200G compare to your namesake, RX32 or RX37?
It's very different .. I haven't played with the RX32 pretty much since I got my first Max 200G. But in my opinion the Max 200g is also vastly superior to the 85 sq in Pro Staff original too. Maybe I'll do a side by side test of the Max and Rx32 one day and post it.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
It's very different .. I haven't played with the RX32 pretty much since I got my first Max 200G. But in my opinion the Max 200g is also vastly superior to the 85 sq in Pro Staff original too. Maybe I'll do a side by side test of the Max and Rx32 one day and post it.
Still own both. Never tried a side-by-side comparison the same day. That day may come this spring
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
The PS85 has more of a modern stiffer flex that makes it easier to spin the ball. The Max 200g is softer and more woody-like feel which makes it great for touch volleys, but more difficult to apply spin. Of course, I’ve only tried my 200g with the 30-year-old syn gut that was in it when I received it - not sure how it would play with spinnier string setup.
 

Snaab

Semi-Pro
IMO a simple NO! If it were possible for anyone to play their best tennis with it, someone would already be doing it. And more likely is that the folks still using it, would play better tennis something more modern.
 
IMO a simple NO! If it were possible for anyone to play their best tennis with it, someone would already be doing it. And more likely is that the folks still using it, would play better tennis something more modern.
My particular case contradicts your theory. Among my 160 rackets I have some modern ones but I play much better with classics including the MAX200G. It all depends on your style of play and your technique.
By the way the current rackets are of a lower quality regardless of their technical characteristics.

A greeting
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
My particular case contradicts your theory. Among my 160 rackets I have some modern ones but I play much better with classics including the MAX200G. It all depends on your style of play and your technique.
By the way the current rackets are of a lower quality regardless of their technical characteristics.

A greeting
Recall the premium price on a new MAX200G
 

yonexRx32

Semi-Pro
Recall the premium price on a new MAX200G
Compared to the manufacturing process of thermoset frames (current, epoxy+carbon sheet rackets) the thermoplastic process is vastly more expensive due to the significantly higher cost of the mold and astronomical cost of the injection machine. Even the manufacturing of thermoset frames of 30 years ago was a more expensive proposition, as manufacturers used up to seven layers of carbon sheet (to today's three or four). That added not only more material but also more work/frame. The finishing and accessories (leather grips on virtually any frame) layers of paint and pain striping, etc.. added to the cost. Nowadays the costs are about $30/frame and we pay for manufactured hype.
 
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michael valek

Professional
Nothing wrong about this. You are missing the point. You can maybe play your best tennis that you can play with a max200g. But your level of tennis would be higher with a modern frame. Guaranteed. Try playing with a max200g on clay in 32c heat. I played the same guy last four weeks, beat him 4 times in a row indoors with a bigger head size (97) more modern frame. Played him this week with my max200g which I love, lost 6-06-0 in 25 mins. Couldn’t defend as well, couldn’t serve as well, even just lost 30% minimum on all shots. Sure if I was playing someone else with a max200g maybe it would be easier but almost impossible to beat someone playing with a head speed pro with rpm blast with a max 200g. And I beat him regularly (not easily but a good match) with a modern frame. Didn’t win a game. They are away in the cupboard.
 

max_brat

Rookie
Nothing wrong about this. You are missing the point. You can maybe play your best tennis that you can play with a max200g. But your level of tennis would be higher with a modern frame. Guaranteed. Try playing with a max200g on clay in 32c heat. I played the same guy last four weeks, beat him 4 times in a row indoors with a bigger head size (97) more modern frame. Played him this week with my max200g which I love, lost 6-06-0 in 25 mins. Couldn’t defend as well, couldn’t serve as well, even just lost 30% minimum on all shots. Sure if I was playing someone else with a max200g maybe it would be easier but almost impossible to beat someone playing with a head speed pro with rpm blast with a max 200g. And I beat him regularly (not easily but a good match) with a modern frame. Didn’t win a game. They are away in the cupboard.
Actually, I can't find a modern frame I like. I have bought 5 RF97s (the black one) in five straight years; they've all gone back on the auction site with a profit for me. I tried the modern Max 200G; it's okay, not great, not a good Max 200G. Tried the Neo Max 2000 (Dunlop Japan's Max 200G throwback with a 98 head), once again, okay, not great. PS90 is the same, that's stiff as hell, tried a Head Prestige, didn't like it. I probably play my best tennis with a Max 200G, on clay in 92 degree heat wearing 80s Tacchini clothing and a Pat Cash headband (of course sunscreen is a must). The ball is crisper, nicer to hit, and I always make a pretty good unreturnable up the line shot 3-5 times a session that wrongfoots my father (or whomever else I've played that week).

As I stated before, it's okay to be wrong!!!
 

max_brat

Rookie
I kept 2 of my youth. In the last years I have acquired 3 more in good condition. Cost 8, 12 and 15 €.
I have an 80s Dunlop 15 racquet bag (I always call it the body bag) full of Max 200Gs. Every possible kind. I even have 3 of the not-IMF, Japan only Max 100G (it's like the Max 200G and Pro Staff 95 had a baby, it's light like the PS85, but has a forgiving touch feel like the Max 200G). I just cleaned the grips on a few this past weekend before going out for a hitting session (now with 5 inches of snow and ice on the ground, it was a good call doing it this past weekend)
 

max_brat

Rookie
Compared to the manufacturing process of thermoset frames (current, epoxy+carbon sheet rackets) the thermoplastic process is vastly more expensive due to the significantly higher cost of the mold and astronomical cost of the injection machine. Even the manufacturing of thermoset frames of 30 years ago was a more expensive proposition, as manufacturers used up to seven layers of carbon sheet (to today's three or four). That added not only more material but also more work/frame. The finishing and accessories (leather grips on virtually any frame) layers of paint and pain striping, etc.. added to the cost. Nowadays the costs are about $30/frame and we pay for manufactured hype.
I actually remember talking to a materials engineer in college about seeing if he could create a couple more of them for me. I can't remember what the cost was, but one thing was I had to give up a 200G to create the mold for it, and I just couldn't do it.
 
I have an 80s Dunlop 15 racquet bag (I always call it the body bag) full of Max 200Gs. Every possible kind. I even have 3 of the not-IMF, Japan only Max 100G (it's like the Max 200G and Pro Staff 95 had a baby, it's light like the PS85, but has a forgiving touch feel like the Max 200G). I just cleaned the grips on a few this past weekend before going out for a hitting session (now with 5 inches of snow and ice on the ground, it was a good call doing it this past weekend)
Fantastic

I also have 1 MAX150G and 1 MAX400i. Excellent both.
 

max_brat

Rookie
Fantastic

I also have 1 MAX150G and 1 MAX400i. Excellent both.
I have a 150G; that's staying tucked away. I did enjoy the 400i once for doubles, but it felt a little bit more awkward than the 200G for some reason. I do have a 300i arriving from Japan, probably after the holidays, so I will have an almost complete collection.
 

yonexRx32

Semi-Pro
I actually remember talking to a materials engineer in college about seeing if he could create a couple more of them for me. I can't remember what the cost was, but one thing was I had to give up a 200G to create the mold for it, and I just couldn't do it.
I checked five or six years ago with a company specialized in injection molding. The cost of the mold came up to $120,000, of which a good chunk was the price of the special aluminum block from which the mold would be machined out. And this is what the injection machine looks like


I don't think the materials engineer you talked to in college fully understood what this was about.
 
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max_brat

Rookie
I checked five or six years ago with a company specialized in injection molding. The cost of the mold came up to $120,000, of which a good chunk was the price of the special aluminum block from which the mold would be machined out. And this is what the injection machine looks like


I don't think the materials engineer you talked to in college fully understood what this was about.
Yeah, I don't think he understood it wasn't braided graphite like a PS85 too well. His girlfriend who played casually kinda got it, but not totally. She did appreciate the Maxply McEnroe I had hanging in my dorm room (which got used as much as my Max 200G)
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I am going to bring my Max 200g to the court with me today. This debate needs to be settled. Will report back.

My volleys are just like McEnroe’s, only much worse.

My fh isn’t like Steffi’s.
Well. This time I wasn’t quite able to feel totally comfortable in warm-up with the Max 200g. I had modded it a little more last night. it already had 10g added at 3 and 9, which I remember liking a lot. This time I added another 2g at 12, and I think it took away a little of the 200g’s soft magic feel. It felt a little springy today, and I ended up going with my trusty UT instead. Maybe next time I’ll try a little different weighting.
 
Well. This time I wasn’t quite able to feel totally comfortable in warm-up with the Max 200g. I had modded it a little more last night. it already had 10g added at 3 and 9, which I remember liking a lot. This time I added another 2g at 12, and I think it took away a little of the 200g’s soft magic feel. It felt a little springy today, and I ended up going with my trusty UT instead. Maybe next time I’ll try a little different weighting.
The preferred mod on the 200G is to lead just at 3 o'clock. I know you know that ;)
 

Frankc

Professional
The preferred mod is to get a "Medium" labeled 200G. Then no weight is needed.
Remember, when they actually made different weights - it is called Craft...
 

Snaab

Semi-Pro
If the former great Italian professional/craftsman Gianluca Pozzi (all slice or flat groundstrokes, and someone who actually looked to get to the net) switched from the Max 200G to the lighter, longer, larger Dunlop Super Revelation +1.00" at some point in the mid to late 90s, lesser mortals should take note. It is okay to be wrong, but not when your paycheck is on the line. Here is an actual example of someone making the switch to stay competitive and "play their best tennis". If you remember, Pozzi was the guy who took Safin to 5 sets in the 4R 2000 USOpen, the year Safin mugged Sampras in the final. He actually beat Safin at Queen's Club earlier that same year. Did Pozzi, McEnroe and Graf all switch from the Max 200G to play less then their best?
 
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If the former great Italian professional/craftsman Gianluca Pozzi (all slice or flat groundstrokes, and someone who actually looked to get to the net) switched from the Max 200G to the lighter, longer, larger Dunlop Super Revelation +1.00" at some point in the mid to late 90s, lesser mortals should take note. It is okay to be wrong, but not when your paycheck is on the line. Here is an actual example of someone making the switch to stay competitive and "play their best tennis". If you remember, Pozzi was the guy who took Safin to 5 sets in the 4R 2000 USOpen, the year Safin mugged Sampras in the final. He actually beat Safin at Queen's Club earlier that same year. Did Pozzi, McEnroe and Graf all switch from the Max 200G to play less then their best?
Hi
I do not enter the forum to debate with other colleagues and this will be my last reply for you.
ok let's talk about professionals.

The ex-atp (with victories over Nadal, Ferrero, Ferrer, Monaco and others) who leads my training group tells me privately that the rackets I use are better than the modern ones used by my young training partners and that he has sold off your sponsorship brand. According to him in the last 20 years there has been no significant improvement and the quality is much worse.

In this forum we all know that Murray plays with a 1993 PT57A (with 16x19). Nadal has been wearing it since 2005. Djokovic has a 1999 tgk frame.

Let's look at the case of Federer. He does play with a new racket.
Until 2002 he played with Ps85 from 1982. This for Wilson was very unprofitable in the market. They pressured Federer to switch to a bigger hoop and after much discussion Roger agreed if the new racket was an enlarged copy of the PS85. With that racket and his multiple paintjobs he has won 17GS.

As for the issue of why Dunlop abandoned the manufacture of the injected graphite mold, there is extensive information in the forum from very competent colleagues.


One last question: we all buy products made in China because it suits us, but we must be aware of the involution of quality that this implies. You can't be so naive as to believe that a $ 5 manufacturing cost racket is a quality product.

I respect your opinion and arguments and I will not enter into any further debate.

a cordial greeting
 

teachingprotx

Hall of Fame
Right o!
But something to consider is the flex of all those frames . Grafs Wilson’s were around the same stiffness as the 200 g if I’m not mistaken .
McEnroe is another..I have absolutely no proof only from members on here that have played with some of macs later frames . Like volk , and his most current Dunlop and they said that his frame is no where even close to retails flex . Much much softer and closer to the og max 200.
I know I personally play better with more modern sticks due solely to weight . Lighter is better for me .,my challenge is finding light enuff and flexible enuff. It’s a super tough combo to find . Unfortunately:(
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
If the former great Italian professional/craftsman Gianluca Pozzi (all slice or flat groundstrokes, and someone who actually looked to get to the net) switched from the Max 200G to the lighter, longer, larger Dunlop Super Revelation +1.00" at some point in the mid to late 90s, lesser mortals should take note. It is okay to be wrong, but not when your paycheck is on the line. Here is an actual example of someone making the switch to stay competitive and "play their best tennis". If you remember, Pozzi was the guy who took Safin to 5 sets in the 4R 2000 USOpen, the year Safin mugged Sampras in the final. He actually beat Safin at Queen's Club earlier that same year. Did Pozzi, McEnroe and Graf all switch from the Max 200G to play less then their best?
McEnroe and Graf switched to stiffer frames later, but you cannot ignore that both of them played by far their best tennis when they wielded the Max 200g.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Right o!
But something to consider is the flex of all those frames . Grafs Wilson’s were around the same stiffness as the 200 g if I’m not mistaken .
McEnroe is another..I have absolutely no proof only from members on here that have played with some of macs later frames . Like volk , and his most current Dunlop and they said that his frame is no where even close to retails flex . Much much softer and closer to the og max 200.
I know I personally play better with more modern sticks due solely to weight . Lighter is better for me .,my challenge is finding light enuff and flexible enuff. It’s a super tough combo to find . Unfortunately:(
I find that the Max 200g is one of the few graphite frames flexible to give the woody-like flex that makes the frame easy to volley with. I confess that I don’t fully understand the physics, but I can volley well with really flexy wood frames with RA in the 30-50 range, and I can volley really well with really stiff frames, especially when RA is 70-80. But frames with RA in the 50-60 range have an intermediate response that makes it much harder to volley well (but easier to apply spin).
 
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