Can I re-string only the crosses?

dolphinsrus

Rookie
Hi guys,

Quick question; I play with X-one by phase 16 on my Babolat Aero at 54 lbs. The crosses on my racquet will break soon. Can I re-string only the crosses (I have a 1/2 set of string that I havent used)? If so, at what tension? Or should I start with a brand new full bed of X-one? Thanks for your input.
 

CopolyX

Hall of Fame
no clue how long the mains have been in?
you can do whatever you what if you are restring it.
your game..

me, na..
fresh..
 
You can, I know a guy in the club that does that, but I'm not sure if you should do that, because the racquet would not plays as well as with fresh strings.
 

Suge

New User
I spoke to a rep at Ashaway and was told a number of people do just restring the crosses (not the kevlar). I restring after 1 use unless I'm exercising the serving muscles. Then I don't expect my practice servers to drop.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
I spoke to a rep at Ashaway and was told a number of people do just restring the crosses (not the kevlar).
I've restrung crosses when the mains were Ashaway Kevlar, a couple of times when I experimented with syn gut crosses and the strings locked up after one playing session. Restrung crosses with Ashaway Zyex.
 

shamaho

Semi-Pro
If you are a serious player or a serious stringer, the answer is it is not recommended. Otherwise, have at it.
Respectfully, define "serious"... I for one would think that any serious (but not professional competitive) player is especially adept for those kind of treatments, because they'd be able to handle the variations... if they do it, they definitely should know WHY they are doing it, and manage the compromises from that.

I restrung poly crosses twice on a racket with a cheapo NatGut and was able to get decent play out of them quite nicely so... I'm missing the logic in your post.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Respectfully, define "serious"... I for one would think that any serious (but not professional competitive) player is especially adept for those kind of treatments, because they'd be able to handle the variations... if they do it, they definitely should know WHY they are doing it, and manage the compromises from that.

I restrung poly crosses twice on a racket with a cheapo NatGut and was able to get decent play out of them quite nicely so... I'm missing the logic in your post.
I fully agree.

Most people are afraid of what they don't know.

The most vocal opposition against re-stringing just the crosses are from those who haven't done it before.

In fact, the playability is the same/better than before, if you know how to do it.
There are guides (your previous trial/error and TWU) to hep you select the right tension.

I have been re-tensioning mains/crosses all the time and can duplicate the playability of a fresh string job.
An added benefit is that when you use the right tension, the playability last significantly longer than a fresh string job.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I fully agree.

Most people are afraid of what they don't know.
A colleague restrung just the crosses on a frame and broke it. I suppose the term "conventional wisdom" means nothing to you. Along those lines, I've always been told not to stare at the sun and have never. I take it you must do it all the time.

The most vocal opposition against re-stringing just the crosses are from those who haven't done it before.
Really? And how do you know this? This seems very presumptive. Have you asked the "vocal opposition" down to the last man?

In fact, the playability is the same/better than before,
Really? Do you have some empirical data to support this? Everything I've read and experienced is to the contrary. Nate Ferguson's advice to the tennis playing public is to restring as often as you can afford it. If your assumption were correct, wouldn't the cadre at the professional level be doing just what you advocate? Seems they don't.

if you know how to do it.
Is there some special way to string crosses? Did your master convey to you some secret knowledge? Seems to me stringing or even restringing crosses would be the same. I would be interested to know what special knowledge or technique is required to do this above and beyond what us "basic" stringers who don't restring just crosses do.

I have been re-tensioning mains/crosses all the time and can duplicate the playability of a fresh string job.
Really? Again, do you have any empirical data to support this? Elasticity cannot be reclaimed. Elasticity is lost with each hit of the ball. Is there some magic oil your master recommended to you that restores a strings properties? Is there some incantation from Georgia that you say when stringing that restores the string? Making such a claim as this completely removes all credibility. Others who restring crosses have said they do so because the mains are not as lively upon restringing. So I'm very interested in which is correct: are the strings magically revived or are they "broken in" and not as lively?

An added benefit is that when you use the right tension, the playability last significantly longer than a fresh string job.
Really?!?!?! And the proof of this is in some measurements you've taken? Do you have a log of string bed tension from first install through restring through breaking or cutting out? Do you have anything other than anecdotal data from a one-sided view of this? Because if you don't, my experience is diametrically opposite of yours. Further, the experience of the vast tennis playing population is aligned with mine. If strings play better only restringing the crosses, then why don't pros do it? It couldn't be breakage because they can afford to carry more rackets. Since the elite change frames every 7 to 9 games, they could have adopt a regiment as you describe and have the on-site stringer install just the crosses after several practice sessions or however many it took to "break in" the mains. But the ugly face of reality says that they don't do this precisely because fresh strings play better than old ones. And since these chaps' livelihood depends on their gear.....well I'll take their word.

In the end, if you (or anybody else) want to string just the crosses, as @MAX PLY said, have at it. But please do not try and justify the practice by saying that it makes the string better or that the string somehow revives itself to a new state. That is the very definition of disingenuous.
 
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Imago

Hall of Fame
No problem. I restring them at least three times mainly for experimental purpose. BUT:

1. My crosses are less.
2. Before cutting them I fix the racket tightly, even at the risk of overtightening.
3. Crosses are strung proportionally, so that only 2-3 in the center are pulled at max reference tension.

These crosses have been restrung two times today

 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
No problem. I restring them at least three times mainly for experimental purpose. BUT:

1. My crosses are less.
2. Before cutting them I fix the racket tightly, even at the risk of overtightening.
3. Crosses are strung proportionally, so that only 2-3 in the center are pulled at max reference tension.

These crosses have been restrung two times today

 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
i’ve done it... not worth it IMO... at the very least because the mains will pop soon after anyway.
 

neverstopplaying

Professional
A colleague restrung just the crosses on a frame and broke it. I suppose the term "conventional wisdom" means nothing to you. Along those lines, I've always been told not to stare at the sun and have never. I take it you must do it all the time.
Do you know how/why the racquet would break?

I don't, as a habit, restring crosses only, but did it recently when I put Alu rough in the crosses of a new racquet and found it too stiff. Since I had VS Team in the mains, I didn't want to cut out the new gut.

I put the frame in the stringer, cut the the crosses from the middle out. I don't see who this could be any more damaging than having a raquet 1/2 strung, i.e.mains only.

I've also done this when string ZX Monogut and it breaks when tieing the last knot. Wouldn't everyone just remove the crosses to restring the mains?

I did witness another player break a string, then one-by-one, start to cut out all the crosses, leaving the mains intact. I stopped him abruptly, telling him he was going to fracture the frame. He stopped, but told me that he did this all the time.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Do you know how/why the racquet would break?
I don't think he knows why the racket would break when re-stringing just the crosses.
You should ask his "colleague".

100% of the time, I string the mains first, then the crosses.
After completing the mains, I sometimes take a break or go out and play some tennis.
I then come back and do the crosses.
So far, I never broke a frame.

Cutting out just the crosses unmounted
I cut out mains/crosses at the same time unmounted.
However, if I just want to remove the crosses, I mount it first, then remove it.
Maybe his "colleague" cut out just the crosses without mounting it first.
There is a high probability that the frame will break if you cut out just the crosses unmounted, especially if the mains tension are high.

After removing the crosses, I just string as usual.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Do you know how/why the racquet would break?
I do not. I only know it has happened. In 35 years of stringing, I've broken one frame. It happened about 5 years ago on my NEOS 1000. I neglected to engage the table lock. I really don't care to buy another frame. There are rules and practices that I follow. A big one is not restringing the crosses because I was told not to. Another is leaving a frame on the machine strung half way. And another is if you break a frame, you replace it. The margins are low enough in stringing that one broken frame can wipe out a bunch of string jobs. I'd just as soon not risk it. I've seen it happen due to restringing only the crosses and don't care to repeat it.



I don't think he knows why the racket would break when re-stringing just the crosses.
You should ask his "colleague".

100% of the time, I string the mains first, then the crosses.
After completing the mains, I sometimes take a break or go out and play some tennis.
I then come back and do the crosses.
So far, I never broke a frame.

Cutting out just the crosses unmounted
I cut out mains/crosses at the same time unmounted.
However, if I just want to remove the crosses, I mount it first, then remove it.
Maybe his "colleague" cut out just the crosses without mounting it first.
There is a high probability that the frame will break if you cut out just the crosses unmounted, especially if the mains tension are high.

After removing the crosses, I just string as usual.
Since you're mocking my use of the word colleague, perhaps you can suggest a better one. Of course this might force you to a dictionary or some semblance of one and that can be troubling for some. The person in question is someone I have strung with at a couple of tournaments. I've given you some clues, now it's up to you to research.

More to the point, perhaps you can address how the mains strung in your frames magically come back to life and play as good as a new set of strings, or in your own words even better. Or how playability lasts "significantly" longer than a fresh string job.

My post above was not as much a criticism of your restringing crosses as it was the "justification" you use. Those were just flat made up. As a matter of fact, I say clearly in my post:

rabbit said:
In the end, if you (or anybody else) want to string just the crosses, as @MAX PLY said, have at it. But please do not try and justify the practice by saying that it makes the string better or that the string somehow revives itself to a new state. That is the very definition of disingenuous.
Savvy?

If restringing the crosses works for you or anybody else, do it. I don't because I was taught not to and there are certain guidelines I regard as ethos. The entire thrust of my post was your justification of restringing the crosses as some kind of rebirth of string that required certain skills and techniques to accomplish.

By the way, there are plenty of posts on the boards which criticize big box stores for doing exactly what you said you do in your quote post, stringing the mains and leaving the racket. I remember Don Hightower of TW expressly saying that was a bad practice. But hey.....you know everything.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Strings may get better with use...

ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION
In a sense, it would appear that the string actually gets better with use, but you just have to re-tension it to get the benefit. Strings do lose more energy with more impacts and decreasing tension. That is mainly from increased friction within the string due to chain reconfigurations as opposed to chain degradation and breakage. But what does losing energy mean?

http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/deadstringsPart2.php
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Strings may get better with use...
Bubble gum may be too but I'm not going to find out.
ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION
In a sense, it would appear that the string actually gets better with use, but you just have to re-tension it to get the benefit.
If you want to just really pre-stretch the string out why not take the string you like to reuse and install it in a frame with no tension and no weaving. You can hold the end of the string with starting clamps. Let it sit in the racket for as long as you want.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
I came to this thread to re-chew bubble gum and re-string crosses. Thank goodness I am out of both
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Little lost about re-stringing crosses. My strings lock-up from the mains notching. Never, ever noticed the crosses notch.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I do not. I only know it has happened. In 35 years of stringing, I've broken one frame. It happened about 5 years ago on my NEOS 1000. I neglected to engage the table lock. I really don't care to buy another frame. There are rules and practices that I follow. A big one is not restringing the crosses because I was told not to. Another is leaving a frame on the machine strung half way. And another is if you break a frame, you replace it. The margins are low enough in stringing that one broken frame can wipe out a bunch of string jobs. I'd just as soon not risk it. I've seen it happen due to restringing only the crosses and don't care to repeat it.





Since you're mocking my use of the word colleague, perhaps you can suggest a better one. Of course this might force you to a dictionary or some semblance of one and that can be troubling for some. The person in question is someone I have strung with at a couple of tournaments. I've given you some clues, now it's up to you to research.

More to the point, perhaps you can address how the mains strung in your frames magically come back to life and play as good as a new set of strings, or in your own words even better. Or how playability lasts "significantly" longer than a fresh string job.

My post above was not as much a criticism of your restringing crosses as it was the "justification" you use. Those were just flat made up. As a matter of fact, I say clearly in my post:



Savvy?

If restringing the crosses works for you or anybody else, do it. I don't because I was taught not to and there are certain guidelines I regard as ethos. The entire thrust of my post was your justification of restringing the crosses as some kind of rebirth of string that required certain skills and techniques to accomplish.

By the way, there are plenty of posts on the boards which criticize big box stores for doing exactly what you said you do in your quote post, stringing the mains and leaving the racket. I remember Don Hightower of TW expressly saying that was a bad practice. But hey.....you know everything.
but aren’t you curious about *why* certain guidelines/policies/laws are used/in place?

personally i need to know... to understand when they are misapplied or don’t apply anymore.

my guess is that the frame broke because when the crosses were cut out, the frame was not secured to the head/throat mount points to keep the tension main-string-tension from collapsing the frame.

i also bet that the reason that this might have happened is... let’s say a (slightly?) larger frame was previously strung, then the smaller frame was put in the stringer without adjusting the mount points... then the crosses cut out. but the story teller probably left that part out because it would lose him sympathy points (or he forgot!).

i’ve been stringing for over 30y. i’ve left only the mains string in my stringer for even a couple weeks. never broke a frame.

i have, however, stupidly released the frame with mains only in (don’t recall why i did)... and cracked the frame.
 
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D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
duplicate
 
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Deleted member 23235

Guest
duplicate
 
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Deleted member 23235

Guest
duplicate
 
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ricardo

Hall of Fame
If you want to just really pre-stretch the string out why not take the string you like to reuse and install it in a frame with no tension and no weaving. You can hold the end of the string with starting clamps. Let it sit in the racket for as long as you want.
Thank you for the suggestion Master ( @Irvin )

I tried this before Master (strung mains @50lbs, left it clamped for 24 hours).
However, the only thing I got was to removed the coil memory, which is good bc it makes stringing easier.
However, there was no permanent elongation.

If there is no permanent elongation, I think there would be no improved tension maintenance.

This is how I currently pre-stretch my strings (https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/pre-stretching-using-a-dw-tensioner.554225/).
 

2nd Serve Ace

Hall of Fame
i’ve done it... not worth it IMO... at the very least because the mains will pop soon after anyway.
Poly or nylon (syn gut/multi) make no sense for doing this.

But I've redone crosses for Natural gut and Kevlar that came out well. 20 hour Ashaway is just starting to get good! Kevlar Rough, basically. Of course, always thread on the opposite side of the mains from before. The dents on the Ashaway mains will actually self-heal and return to shape after a while.

The pull tension has to be watched though on the new Xs because it does really up the tension on the mains as well.
Some increase with Natty, ALOT with Kev.
 
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chrisingrassia

Professional
40 responses on this topic.

I swear it's always the same two or three posters that keep bringing up this topic. Over and over and over and over. Are these troll accounts or something?
The internet of misinformation -- sheesh.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I've tried restringing crosses a few times with nat gut mains. One of the problems I encountered that stood out to me is that the mains undergo wear and tension loss on the first string job (which can't easily be defined or measured). The wear can't be reversed. One could re-tension the mains (if you have prepared to do so in advance) - in order to combat the tension loss. But how do you know where to set the tension? Same goes for the crosses - same tension, less, more? At best, it's an educated guess, based on experimentation. The problem with that it seems to me is, logically, guessing (educationally or not) is at odds with consistency.

This isn't the first time that I've seen comments to the effect that the resulting job(s) from restringing only the crosses feel the same, or even better than the first string job. That wasn't my experience. That may well be others' experience. But I can't help but wonder if how the racquet feels to those who make these statements is influenced by the positive effect on their wallets and/or the idea that they are gaming "the system" or somehow getting away with something that isn't mainstream.
 

Wes

Semi-Pro
I've tried restringing crosses a few times with nat gut mains. One of the problems I encountered that stood out to me is that the mains undergo wear and tension loss on the first string job (which can't easily be defined or measured). The wear can't be reversed. One could re-tension the mains (if you have prepared to do so in advance) - in order to combat the tension loss. But how do you know where to set the tension? Same goes for the crosses - same tension, less, more? At best, it's an educated guess, based on experimentation. The problem with that it seems to me is, logically, guessing (educationally or not) is at odds with consistency.

This isn't the first time that I've seen comments to the effect that the resulting job(s) from restringing only the crosses feel the same, or even better than the first string job. That wasn't my experience. That may well be others' experience. But I can't help but wonder if how the racquet feels to those who make these statements is influenced by the positive effect on their wallets and/or the idea that they are gaming "the system" or somehow getting away with something that isn't mainstream.
:D
Now, that's one fine post.
 

jim e

Legend
What's next a thread about running your 20k mile used motor oil through a strainer and putting it back into your engine?
The people that would do that, would also most likely tell you the car runs better as well!

I am probably one of the few people that does change own oil, as I use fully synth Mobile 1 EP and change it at 6,000 miles or less. One of my cars is 43 yrs old and orig. engine and orig. owner. I even use that oil in lawnmower
 
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