Can shoe change cause calf injury?

oldcity

Rookie
I recently changed from barricades of three years to Asics. The shoes feel great but a little different obviously. This would be nonsense to me but I developed the same injury in both legs within a week. I started feeling sharp pain in the right calf three weeks after the shoe change. not the bulky muscle on the outside but something deep inside, a mid to high calf. I took it easy for a week and came back the following week for some light doubles with an older couple, with my right calf tightly wrapped. I started developing the same pain in the left calf. later in the day I was hitting with my partner and strained/injured whatever was going on in the right calf pretty bad while changing directions. had to limp off court and wrap it in ice. hurt like hell for a couple of days.
rested two weeks. came back hitting with partner with both legs wrapped, taking it easy, one or two steps, no running or driving off of either foot. later I got a little over eager and changed directions hard, forgetting I had an injury, tearing up that right calf injury immediately. had to limp off of the court and wrap it in ice. The left has bothered me since with some light pain but no serious injury.
I thought it was suspicious that the same thing is going on in both legs at the same time. Ive rehabbed many muscle injuries, including calf muscle strains, knee injuries, but never this particular injury. Not sure what it is or how much rest I need but its been two weeks since the re-injury and I'm itching to hit again but dreading having to start over with another tear.
 

oldcity

Rookie
I also do light workouts in gym regularly but no legs since injury. I ride on and off-road bikes weekly. since the re-injury I've only done a couple of road rides, 5-10 miles, one bridge. took it easy on the bridge but I could feel the both calves. both have been sore the last week.
 

WildVolley

Legend
It is possible that a shoe change could contribute to an injury. An obvious issue would be a change in drop. Drop is the difference between the height of the sole stack between the heel and the forefoot. If you are used to a shoe with a large drop and then switch to a shoe with less of a drop, it can contribute to more stress on the Achilles tendons and calves.

In short, a shoe change can contribute to injury. I'm not certain it is the cause in your case but you should try to examine the difference in the shoes in terms of fit and stance.

I tend to play in different shoes and go barefoot as much as possible off the courts to maintain flexibility and strength in my feet.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
They are both good quality shoes. I would get a Physio to have a look at you. If you are on the court for long hours, your calves would get really tight so over time you may injure yourself,
One way of finding out with the shoes is to go back to your barricades and see how you go.
If you get a set of orthodics for your feet you can wear most shoes, in the end comfort is a key consideration and shock absorption especially if you play on hardcourts all the time. The type of sole and it's compatability to the surface is another consideration. Hard court shoes need turning circles so you don't grip to hard on the surface and you can chsnge direction with less friction.
 

Crocodile

Hall of Fame
Just to add another point, where shoes become a problem is when you wear them too long as they do lose their structural rigidity then can cause foot and knee problems. Runners know this quite well. When their knees start to twinge they change their shoes.
The other area to look into is the width of the shoe and the impact it has on your toes and other bony parts of your feat. If you get uncomfortable it will affect the way you walk and that will cause you injuries.
 

aag

New User
I had the same question -- after playing for years with no injuries, ended up with a partial tear in the calf muscle; one obvious change was a recent change of shoes, from Prince T22 and older Barricades to Wilson Rush Pro 2.5. This was literally my second week playing with the new shoes.
 

esgee48

Legend
I try to break in new tennis shoes before wearing them to play. The soles are not so sticky. The uppers stretch out and your feet get use to the shape of the shoe. Walking in them for 2-3 hours help a lot. 3¢
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I have developed shin splints more readily with different shoes but not noticed any calf issues. I did have a partial tear in one of my Achilles tendons. But don't think that was necessarily a shoe issue.
 
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