Can TE improve even though u keep playing?

Arvid

Semi-Pro
So recently i got some te, not much its more of a discomfort but it wont go away. So i think i know what happened, i was practicing against a backboard and for a few days it was very windy which may have led to more misshits then usual. I haven't changed my set up from usual head pro tour with a full bed of solinco tourbite soft strung at 21 kg, about 44lb i think. So this is kind of ridiculous, it seems that my body is very susceptible inflammations dont know why that is....Now to make my setup even more armfriendly i have ordered some technifibre biphase multi which leads to my question. In no way is that a setup that could lead to te, but now i have an aggravated elbow already, will my te deteriorate if i keep playing or could i even see it improve? Dont want to stop playing now that my favourite part of the season is coming up...The only te problems ive had in the past was my left arm(im righthanded)very strange in itself, to fully get rid of that i had to stop playing and take a cortisone shot....hope i dont have to do that this time...
 

mikeler

Moderator
It depends how severe it is. I've played through tennis elbow a few times. The one time I got golfer's elbow though I had to take a 6 week break and treatment to get back on the court.
 

Arvid

Semi-Pro
Well its not severe at all at the moment, more like a discomfort. Its only that it seems that my body really is very prone to inflammations and then holding on to them like grim death! Ive also had knee tendonitis that was never that severe but still had to take multiple cortisone shots to make it go away....
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
In no way is that a setup that could lead to te, but now i have an aggravated elbow already
this is dangerous and somewhat foolish thinking; people (including Tony Roche) were getting TE in the days of wood racquets with RA of about 30, strung with gut. There is no such thing as an entirely safe set-up. Can your TE improve while you continue to play? Perhaps. But you should be aware that it can also get worse and possibly become chronic TE that never goes away. Personally, I'd stay away from the game for a while and do gentle stretching.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
-TE can be brought on by many things, repetitive action keeps it happening
-at lower levels of play 3.5 and lower, its technique and poor execution, late contact etc... (4.0s and above have better timing and execution, so issue at level is different)
-grip size changes from larger to smaller grips can also cause TE, (the smaller the grip the tighter you squeeze to hold on hand, thusly more pressure on arm = TE)
-racquet changes are also a big factor; the change in balance (BIG issue 2me) and vibration absorption (also a factor)
-string changes can cause it and/or aggravate it, (but @Arvid i dont think this is it for you, at 44lbs it should be ok, i think its something else)
-btw changing strings (poly to multi), when you get TE, its like putting on a sweater when you already have a cold!, it feels good, yes, but it does not address the real issue directly!!
 

Arvid

Semi-Pro
-TE can be brought on by many things, repetitive action keeps it happening
-at lower levels of play 3.5 and lower, its technique and poor execution, late contact etc... (4.0s and above have better timing and execution, so issue at level is different)
-grip size changes from larger to smaller grips can also cause TE, (the smaller the grip the tighter you squeeze to hold on hand, thusly more pressure on arm = TE)
-racquet changes are also a big factor; the change in balance (BIG issue 2me) and vibration absorption (also a factor)
-string changes can cause it and/or aggravate it, (but @Arvid i dont think this is it for you, at 44lbs it should be ok, i think its something else)
-btw changing strings (poly to multi), when you get TE, its like putting on a sweater when you already have a cold!, it feels good, yes, but it does not address the real issue directly!!
Well i think i know what happened to cause my TE and its quite simple increased misshitting during som windy days. The only question is what will it take to make it go away, and if its possible even if i keep playing. Sometimes i read about people that develop TE with stiff raquets high strung poly and so on, but they change their setup and it goes away, this gives me hope that its possible. I have also ordered a therra band flexbar....
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
I've improved multiple episodes of TE like symptoms while still playing. Never changed my setup, only worked on the soft tissue via bodywork and stretching, some episodes using Thera Bar. So you can improve it, but it also would be smarter to implement some rest periods.
 

SeeItHitIt

Professional
TE is less likely to ‘go away’ if you keep playing. That said, all depends on the severity of the TE and whether your tennis stroke caused it/inflames it to begin with. My TE resulted in a Nirschl procedure in 1999. All has been 5\5 since the recovery and I’ve even played with 4g when Ive wanted to! Not sure mine was even caused by tennis as I was overdoing quite a few sports at the time. But the bottom line is it’s not likely getting any better with additional play, setup irrespective.

(Nirschl procedure - a surgical procedure for treating chronic inflammation of the elbow. It involves excision of a segment from the hypercapsular tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and removal of the head of the anterolateral condyle.)
 

jmc3367

Rookie
Just speaking from personal experience.. I use a very arm friendly racket Textreme tour 95 2015 model in case you were wondering. I string it with tier one fire wire. I am not sure how stiff the string is compared to others. Anyway, I got some tennis elbow while trying some different rackets and set ups. Once I went back to my standard setup that I just described the tennis elbow continued. I ended up buying a brace from academy sports with the gel inserts that pressure the outside and inside of the elbow. My pain went away in about a month. I continued to play 3-4 times a week and now I don't use the brace any longer. I am not saying your will but that was my experience
 

magnut

Hall of Fame
your playing with fire on this. Its tendonitis.... it isnt like a strained muscle that just goes away. Your going to need to take time off. Continue playing is just going to make it worse and take longer to heal. The bands are more preventative than anything. The damage is done. Dont make it worse. Dump the poly, get a soft frame and add some weight. Then fix any flaws you have in your strokes and focus on clean hitting. Cortizone shots are pretty dangerous for TE. You need to feel that pain to know whats going on.

This is the reason I learned to play left handed.
 

HouTex

Rookie
Cortisone makes the pain go away but you can still be damaging the tendon if you play shortly after the shot. I had three shots spread out over several months. Each time my surgeon told me not to play for a month after the shot. And after the shot my elbow felt great during that month. After the effects of the shot wore off, and without playing any tennis, the pain came back after each shot. Basically, with a bad case of TE, just layoff tennis completely.
 

magnut

Hall of Fame
Why? Just asking because my physio was considering giving me one of those...
Your going to have to stop playing. Let it hurt so you dont get overconfident one day thinking you can get away with it.

Just play lefty or focus on another interest. Get your mind off tennis. Get a girl if you dont have one. They will keep you busy.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
TE is something you want to jump on hard and early, as soon as you feel discomfort. Playing through it is something that can have serious long-term ramifications if ignored.
  1. Stop aggravating the injury. This means stop playing, completely and immediately.
  2. Bring down the inflammation. This means ice 3-4 times a day for 20 minutes, and an OTC anti-inflammatory like ibuoprofen, for up to 3 days.
  3. Get a treatment program. This means see a doctor or physio - TE varies widely from person to person and a tailored approach is best.
  4. Rest the joint. This means you do not even think about picking up a racquet until you are 100% pain free - whether that's a week or a year.
  5. Get the right equipment. This means an arm friendly racquet (e.g. Wilson Clash) and natural gut strings (some people also like a brace).
  6. Review your technique. This means get a lesson with a pro (preferably an old guy who is used to aches and pains) and tell him you had TE.
  7. Ease your way back in. This means build your fitness back up slowly, otherwise you'll be back to square one.
Good luck. There are lots of people on this forum who have suffered badly from TE and give great advice - @IowaGuy, @TypeRx and @ByeByePoly spring to mind.
 

HouTex

Rookie
In my case, ice did nothing. I iced it 4-5 times a day for 20+ min each time. I did it for several months and never saw improvement. For me, heat worked better. I soaked it for 30 minutes each morning in the hottest water I could stand. That, along with PT, Graston and time finally healed it. It was a 20 month journey until I could play without pain.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
@Arvid , I get TE less and less because I am tapering off experimenting with stiff rackets and poly string but when I do get TE I play through it using a POG OS and the other pictured therapeutics. I don't normally play with a POG. I think hard massage in the afflicted area and all around with both the roller ball and an electric massager do a lot to improve circulation. I tried all the "approved" methods without much success. So I came up with my own "stuff" and routine.
 
Last edited:

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
TE is something you want to jump on hard and early, as soon as you feel discomfort. Playing through it is something that can have serious long-term ramifications if ignored.
  1. Stop aggravating the injury. This means stop playing, completely and immediately.
  2. Bring down the inflammation. This means ice 3-4 times a day for 20 minutes, and an OTC anti-inflammatory like ibuoprofen, for up to 3 days.
  3. Get a treatment program. This means see a doctor or physio - TE varies widely from person to person and a tailored approach is best.
  4. Rest the joint. This means you do not even think about picking up a racquet until you are 100% pain free - whether that's a week or a year.
  5. Get the right equipment. This means an arm friendly racquet (e.g. Wilson Clash) and natural gut strings (some people also like a brace).
  6. Review your technique. This means get a lesson with a pro (preferably an old guy who is used to aches and pains) and tell him you had TE.
  7. Ease your way back in. This means build your fitness back up slowly, otherwise you'll be back to square one.
Good luck. There are lots of people on this forum who have suffered badly from TE and give great advice - @IowaGuy, @TypeRx and @ByeByePoly spring to mind.
Good advice.

My TE went away after resting until pain-free, and then switching to full-bed natural gut.

I will definitely never play poly strings again!
 

magnut

Hall of Fame
Good advice.

My TE went away after resting until pain-free, and then switching to full-bed natural gut.

I will definitely never play poly strings again!
Happened twice for me.... one time elbow... another time wrist. Took a full year each time to recover..... I learned to play left handed because left handed tennis was better than no tennis. Kept me from going insane and also strengthened my body and improved footwork and overall balance. I am a pretty darn good lefty now. Its a lot easier when you know what your doing. Learning the other hand is not like never playing tennis before. The raw skills are all already there. Just need to spend some time on the ball machine at first. A big plus is you have a lot more people to play with. I had more practice partners as a lefty than I ever did as a righty.

Never had arms issues in my life before poly and I play a lot. Kevlar doesnt even bother me. I threw that wire garage in the trash and have never used it again. Never had an elbow or wrist problem again either.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Due to familial hypercholesterolemia, I'm very prone to tendinopathies. So I've had achilles, patellar, TE and GE in my 50's. Everyone of them has gotten better without serious intervention like prolonged rest. That being said, GE has been the most challenging to rid myself of and while it's been over a year and is about 80% better, it required changing gear, changing technique, physio and reduction in play.

So everything can vary even within one individual. I would suggest having an arm friendly set up you can rely on if you are getting arm issues. No poly. Flexible frame. Ensure your technique is not putting strain on your arm. Resist quick fixes like cortisone shots. Do eccentric exercises, massage and stretching.
 

GeoffHYL

Professional
I went through TE last year. I didn't rest, but played through it. It was brought on by switching racquets to a one strung with a poly that didn't agree with me. I had already played with another racquet of the same model strung with a different poly with no ill effects, but for some reason the poly setup in this one racquet brought on TE. I didn't want to stop playing, so I went back to setups that were good for my arm, did some exercises and massages, and gradually it got better. It took about 6 months, so if I had just rested maybe a couple of months it would have gone away, but the pain was not severe, and it mostly hurt after playing when I moved certain ways, so it was not a bad case to begin with.

FWIW, I can still play with poly without any elbow issues, though I mostly play synthetic gut, Babolat Spiraltek 17g being my current favorite.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
this is dangerous and somewhat foolish thinking; people (including Tony Roche) were getting TE in the days of wood racquets with RA of about 30, strung with gut. There is no such thing as an entirely safe set-up. Can your TE improve while you continue to play? Perhaps. But you should be aware that it can also get worse and possibly become chronic TE that never goes away. Personally, I'd stay away from the game for a while and do gentle stretching.
TE due to wood rackets was probably due to dramatic power drop off from the sweetspot, which was very small, causing shock waves, and from lack of handle cushioning (just leather wrapped around wood). So benefit of low RA was canceled by other discomforting issues. Mishits in wood rackets are very painful, hence the emphasis in those days of rigid wrist and linear strokes focusing on the sweetspot, not more wristy and angular across the ball as today.
 

Jarno Saari

New User
Hello! I also had ones very bad tennis elbow. I had to quit playing for 9 mounts.. I took the time of and heald my hand for good.
I made 4 video serie abouth tennis elbow and there I share some good tips to cure the problem. If you are interested please check it out Hopo it helps!

 

HBK4life

Semi-Pro
Had it when I was in my early 20s. Read somewhere to do reverse curls with a preacher bar with medium weight and high reps. Never had an issue since.
 

Arvid

Semi-Pro
Thanks all you guys for youre great advice, in the end i guess each body is different and i have to take the route that i know has worked for me before and not what hasnt worked. I havent played at all for a few weeks now, so yesterday i played for maybe 15 minutes against the backboard again, no good, it definately aggravated the elbow. As i mentioned before it seems that my body really seeks these kind of inflammations, previously ive had a shoulder inflammation, knee tendonitis, and my left elbow as well. The only thing that has EVER worked for me has been anti inflammatories combined with plenty of rest. Ive been to physiotherapists that gave me excercises and i can honestly say if anything it only made things worse. Of course i would like to avoid cortisone shots and anti inflammtories if i could because i know it takes a long time, but its been what worked in the past, and heres why i think i have had such good results even though most people dont when they go that route. When you get stuck with an inflammation thats the thing, you get stuck with it and youre body gets used to it and you cant break it, and the longer it goes the more youre body gets used to it. So when you take a cortisone shot or a strong anti inflammatory drug you break that cycle....however here is the thing, youre body has to get used to not having the inflammation, so after lets say youve been taking something for a couple of weeks and been inflammation free, you have to keep youre body in that state for quite a while, if you suceed with that then youre home free, thats what ive managed to do in the past. So will do that now to, starting to take ibuprofen today or tomorow, hopefully that will stop the inflammation and if im free from sympthom a few weeks after that maybe i will try a little of play again and see what happens. The biggest misstakes people do when theyve taken a cortisone shot or something is get back doing what gave them their injury to quickly, and thats why people have such poor results. When you feel good you instantly want to get back doing what you did before....nope doesnt work, but if you let youre body get used to feeling well, you have good chances....
 

HouTex

Rookie
Thanks all you guys for youre great advice, in the end i guess each body is different and i have to take the route that i know has worked for me before and not what hasnt worked. I havent played at all for a few weeks now, so yesterday i played for maybe 15 minutes against the backboard again, no good, it definately aggravated the elbow. As i mentioned before it seems that my body really seeks these kind of inflammations, previously ive had a shoulder inflammation, knee tendonitis, and my left elbow as well. The only thing that has EVER worked for me has been anti inflammatories combined with plenty of rest. Ive been to physiotherapists that gave me excercises and i can honestly say if anything it only made things worse. Of course i would like to avoid cortisone shots and anti inflammtories if i could because i know it takes a long time, but its been what worked in the past, and heres why i think i have had such good results even though most people dont when they go that route. When you get stuck with an inflammation thats the thing, you get stuck with it and youre body gets used to it and you cant break it, and the longer it goes the more youre body gets used to it. So when you take a cortisone shot or a strong anti inflammatory drug you break that cycle....however here is the thing, youre body has to get used to not having the inflammation, so after lets say youve been taking something for a couple of weeks and been inflammation free, you have to keep youre body in that state for quite a while, if you suceed with that then youre home free, thats what ive managed to do in the past. So will do that now to, starting to take ibuprofen today or tomorow, hopefully that will stop the inflammation and if im free from sympthom a few weeks after that maybe i will try a little of play again and see what happens. The biggest misstakes people do when theyve taken a cortisone shot or something is get back doing what gave them their injury to quickly, and thats why people have such poor results. When you feel good you instantly want to get back doing what you did before....nope doesnt work, but if you let youre body get used to feeling well, you have good chances....
Be careful with ibuprofen for prolonged periods. I took 2 every morning for many months while I was recovering from TE. It clearly helped with the pain. But the blood work at my next physical showed decreased kidney function. It recovered but prolonged use of IB can damage your kidneys.
 

Arvid

Semi-Pro
Be careful with ibuprofen for prolonged periods. I took 2 every morning for many months while I was recovering from TE. It clearly helped with the pain. But the blood work at my next physical showed decreased kidney function. It recovered but prolonged use of IB can damage your kidneys.
[/QUOI
Im only taking it for 10 days. Yeah im pretty sure all anti inflamatorys are really bad to be taking for longer periods of time.....
 

Crocodile

Legend
Depends what stage you are in recovery. While in an inflammatory state ( early phase) rest snd ice is best and Physio therapy including dry needling can help.
At the end of the day if you can afford the time off, then have the time off. Your pain level will tell you a lot about whether you can play or not. Your age and physical condition will also have a bearing on how you heal as well as your technique and equipment choice.
 

Arvid

Semi-Pro
Ok so i think i can say with some certainty now that my te is gone, and heres how it happened and didnt happen. I suppose that each body is different and responds differently to different treatments. In the past ive had trouble with knee tendonitis, te in my left arm and now te in my right arm. What has NEVER worked for ME has been physiotherapy of different kinds. Note that i say hasnt worked for me, and thats what i mean when i say each body is different, cause i read a lot of positive stories about good succes with flexbars and stuff. Those kind of things has not only never worked for me, they have only made things worse!! And that goes both for the times when i had knee tendonitis and te. So this time around i contracted my te probably sometime in early april, so i thought this time around i could get by with doing some exercises, so i tried various plus flexbar, like i said only worse. And all of this time i did not play any tennis. I tried a couple of weeks of ibuprofen, only worked for the time i took it, when i got of the pain was back immediately. Sence ive had such good results with cortisone in the past i went ahead and took a cortisone shot, and that was my cure. I know a lot of people are very critical of cortisone injections, but i believe i know why it doesnt work for most people and why it has worked for me on multiple ocassions. The shot will make you feel like youre cured instantly, this is were it goes wrong for most people, they think they are cured which they are not. The cure is take youre cortisone shot and then allow youre body to get used to not having an inflammation anymore. Shot, feel good, do nothing, for a good while. Maybe the longer youve had the pain the longer you need to let youre body get used to not having an inflammation. For me 3 and a half weeks was enough, im pain free now playing tennis and feel like i felt before i had te. Hope this can be of help for someone that maybe has a body that reacts similarly to me....
 

HouTex

Rookie
My doctor told me a cortisone shot followed by 3-4 weeks of inactivity cures something like 80% of patients. Didn’t work for me. I had two more shots a few months apart and each time my pain went away but it eventually came back a few weeks after the shot. PT and no tennis finally cured it but it took 20 months. Every case is different like you said.
 

PKorda

Rookie
My doctor told me a cortisone shot followed by 3-4 weeks of inactivity cures something like 80% of patients. Didn’t work for me. I had two more shots a few months apart and each time my pain went away but it eventually came back a few weeks after the shot. PT and no tennis finally cured it but it took 20 months. Every case is different like you said.
That seems suspect. Plus you don't know who is patients are, could be like 70 year old women playing once a week.
 

HouTex

Rookie
That seems suspect. Plus you don't know who is patients are, could be like 70 year old women playing once a week.
He was giving me broad stats. He’s well known and well respected in Houston with one of the leading sports medicine clinics. I’m sure he was correct in his estimate. I was scheduled for surgery with him and I got a second opinion from another surgeon who gave me another cortisone shot and he quoted me similar odds. It didn’t work and he eventually recommended against surgery in favor of PT and rest. It took a long time but I eventually healed. I’m glad I didn’t do the surgery. Both surgeons gave me a 15% failure rate on the surgery and the second surgeon even said that there have been cases that the tendon never heals properly and that I would be forced to play left handed. I didn’t like those odds so I opted for a long rehab.
 

PKorda

Rookie
He was giving me broad stats. He’s well known and well respected in Houston with one of the leading sports medicine clinics. I’m sure he was correct in his estimate. I was scheduled for surgery with him and I got a second opinion from another surgeon who gave me another cortisone shot and he quoted me similar odds. It didn’t work and he eventually recommended against surgery in favor of PT and rest. It took a long time but I eventually healed. I’m glad I didn’t do the surgery. Both surgeons gave me a 15% failure rate on the surgery and the second surgeon even said that there have been cases that the tendon never heals properly and that I would be forced to play left handed. I didn’t like those odds so I opted for a long rehab.
Think you did the right thing. I’m not a doctor but based on my own experience of having it several times and talking to others my recommendation would be trying to strengthen the tendon. Personally wouldn’t do cortisone shots but again not a medical professional.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
My doctor told me a cortisone shot followed by 3-4 weeks of inactivity cures something like 80% of patients. Didn’t work for me. I had two more shots a few months apart and each time my pain went away but it eventually came back a few weeks after the shot. PT and no tennis finally cured it but it took 20 months. Every case is different like you said.
Your doctor must have trained in the 60's. I don't think any physician believes much in cortisone healing TE anymore. It's a powerful anti-inflammatory that eases symptoms but it won't improve the degeneration in the tendon. Most sports physicians are recognizing the degenerative changes that underlie tendinopathies and recommend exercises and treatments to build up the tendon's resilience.

Problem with American based medicine is it's for-profit nature that encourages surgeons to recommend surgery even when it's never been proven to be superior to less invasive interventions. The US has far more spine surgeries per capita despite similar rates of back problems in the population compared to other nations. There is very poor level of evidence in support of 80% of spine operations over conservative management. This is likely true of most tendon operations for tendinitis since the Cochrane review of surgery for tennis elbow could not find any evidence of substantial quality to support surgery. But have knife, will cut.

That being said, most conservative approaches lack high quality evidence as well, but at least they don't leave a scar and potential damage.
 

HouTex

Rookie
Nope. Trained in the 90’s and the second one late 90’s or early 00’s. I received typical treatment for TE in Houston by some of the best ortho surgeons around.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Nope. Trained in the 90’s and the second one late 90’s or early 00’s. I received typical treatment for TE in Houston by some of the best ortho surgeons around.
Recommendations will be highly biased depending on who you see with this disease since there is so little proof. If you want procedures, see a surgeon. If you want physical measures see a physiatrist or physiotherapist. If you want accupuncture, see an accupuncturist. Everyone will suggest what they do best because you can't be proven wrong if you haven't done the research to prove your treatment doesn't work.

These guys may do awesome surgery, but the art of medicine is knowing when to operate and when not to. I've had 6 cases of tendinitis that all healed without surgery even though some took many months. I've had a disc protrusion that healed without surgery. Every one of those things likely would have got me a recommendation for surgery if I'd seen a surgeon.

Unless you are an athlete in the prime of your earning career, I'd always cool my heels on surgery for sports injuries, especially tendinopathies. The natural history of many conditions is to get better eventually on their own.
 

HouTex

Rookie
Recommendations will be highly biased depending on who you see with this disease since there is so little proof. If you want procedures, see a surgeon. If you want physical measures see a physiatrist or physiotherapist. If you want accupuncture, see an accupuncturist. Everyone will suggest what they do best because you can't be proven wrong if you haven't done the research to prove your treatment doesn't work.

These guys may do awesome surgery, but the art of medicine is knowing when to operate and when not to. I've had 6 cases of tendinitis that all healed without surgery even though some took many months. I've had a disc protrusion that healed without surgery. Every one of those things likely would have got me a recommendation for surgery if I'd seen a surgeon.

Unless you are an athlete in the prime of your earning career, I'd always cool my heels on surgery for sports injuries, especially tendinopathies. The natural history of many conditions is to get better eventually on their own.
You haven’t seen my other posts on this topic in other threads. I went to two different orthopaedic surgeons. The first gave me the options and I chose to do the surgery only after his recommended PT and two cortisone shots spread out over 2-3 months did not work. Before I went under the knife I got a second opinion from another very good ortho surgeon who was also an acquaintance of mine. He gave me similar odds and backed up everything the first surgeon told me and he suggested I not have surgery and so I cancelled it. The first surgeon really didn’t push anything on me. He simply said it could take over a year to heal on its own with PT (he was correct) and that if the surgery was successful I could be playing again in a couple of months. I was so depressed about the prospect of no tennis for more than a year that I initially chose the surgery. After I cooled off and got the second opinion I decided to wait it out. Both surgeons recommended PT during their treatment and I followed their advice. The second surgeon recommended the Graston treatment in addition to traditional PT and I did that as well. Eventually, after 20 months, I could play again. As far as the treatment by the surgeons, I received excellent healthcare. I never got the feeling the first one was pushing surgery. In fact, he only gave me the option after weeks of his prescribed PT and cortisone shots didn’t work. Both of them told me that TE is self limiting. Eventually, with enough rest, the tendon will heal on its own.
 

HouTex

Rookie
Also, as far as proof, the first surgeon performed an MRI after the two cortisone shots and PT didn’t show much progress. It showed clear evidence of tendon damage at the point of the TE.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Mine improved. But I was I was hitting forehands with my right arm most of the time when I developed TE in my preferred, left arm. Every once in awhile I would hit a two-handed backhand on my right side rather than using a one-handed lefty Bh.
 

morten

Hall of Fame
Update.. have played lightly once a month. But not really successfully.. getting stronger but light pain during play and wrecked after, especially since playing quite hard 2 days ago.. i have only tried excercise my forearm for one day here and there, maybe it's time to do it more ?
 

thorcyar

New User
wow, I'm feeling home on this topic ! I'm 40 and developed T.E. in december : lots of mishits due to eyes issues, bad technique probably due to ankle pain preventing kinetic chain to work, and also babolat aero team 2016 frame with multi filament, size 4 and most probably 1 size too large. And also got tennis leg in december with the use of crutches that agravated the T.E.

stopped tennis then, sold my pureaeros and bought pk Q+5pro with smaller grip (still brand new waiting to be cured) . got cortizone injection in February, that did nothing. Got cortizone injection 2 weeks ago, T.E. (and golf elbow pain also) greatly improved ............ but still there. I cannot learn to play left handed because ......... T.E. and G.E. are showing up there too (because I just got a baby, and holding it only with one arm .... you know ...

well. Just received my theraband flexbar, but seems it's too soon for me. I'm home in this topic !
 

undecided

Semi-Pro
Played in bad wind yesterday. Then, both arms felt mild GE discomfort. I think playing in poor conditions can cause players (like myself) to hit late and try to muscle the racquet and the ball. I've been playing daily for 1 month now and no discomfort until after yesterdays game. I knew I was hitting the ball late as it was happening because the wind was moving the ball around to much to get a clean 'loose' hit on it.
 

HelenCH

New User
Mine did. But I was lucky to catch it very early. It didn't start troubling me. Just tightness in the area after matches and very sore to the touch. Tightness would be gone by next day, and I never felt any pain without touching the area. Hitting felt normal. I changed strings to softer poly, dropped tension by almost 10 lbs, and changed from Babolat PS17 to Yonex Ezone. I also started doing flexbar exercises, but kept playing as usually, 5 times a week, 8-10 hours. In about 8-9 months it resolved completely.
 
Top