Can you guess my level off a forehand alone?

K1Y

Rookie
I know the title is ridiculous but wondering what people would guess just by watching me hit 3 forehands. Main question: what can I improve?

 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
Not really, but I'd say 4.0-5.0. You have the relaxed look of a stealth 5.0, but then again if these are highlights or every other stroke is terrible you might be a 4.0.
 

K1Y

Rookie
Thank you all for helping out and rating so kind! tbh I actually don't know my rating in NTRP. I'm rated an 7 in ITN. I looked at some charts and that would translate to an 3.0 NTRP. This rating is maybe not too accurate because I haven't played full time/competed in 9 years. Want to get back in the game and searching for gear that is meant for my playing level. I know matchplay and capabilities are not the same but I'm looking for gear that would suit me. US ratings and terms like intermediate/advanced are pretty vague to me. I don't want to self-rate because my ego would play too much of a part. If I had to I would guess mine at 4.0-4.5 after watching others footage online. But I feel like universal tennis rating conversion charts are not too accurate. But it could have to do with regional differences in competitiveness. I know this isnt accurate and tennis is much more than how a short rally ball looks, but this was a fun little experiment to see other peoples perception. I think I could lose easily to 3.5s aswell but on the other hand this was some sort of semi good confirmation of the range that I could compete at. I could've uploaded a better video and maybe I will later but I'd have to record that and I don't have equipment that would make good quality video. This quick video was made by a friend because I wanted to see what my backswing looked like. Sadly I used to be obsessed with that.

@FuzzyYellowBalls Thanks! that's a very kind guess. It were def not highlights, although half of the time I play lazier than this. Ofc forehand is my best shot but the rest of my game isn't a whole lot different. This was just the only video I have atm and was curious to see how people rate vs how I would self rate it without having an updated ranking.

btw if anyone sees suboptimal things in my tecnique on what I could work on further let me know :)
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
Thank you all for helping out and rating so kind! tbh I actually don't know my rating in NTRP. I'm rated an 7 in ITN. I looked at some charts and that would translate to an 3.0 NTRP. This rating is maybe not too accurate because I haven't played full time/competed in 9 years. Want to get back in the game and searching for gear that is meant for my playing level. I know matchplay and capabilities are not the same but I'm looking for gear that would suit me. US ratings and terms like intermediate/advanced are pretty vague to me. I don't want to self-rate because my ego would play too much of a part. If I had to I would guess mine at 4.0-4.5 after watching others footage online. But I feel like universal tennis rating conversion charts are not too accurate. But it could have to do with regional differences in competitiveness. I know this isnt accurate and tennis is much more than how a short rally ball looks, but this was a fun little experiment to see other peoples perception. I think I could lose easily to 3.5s aswell but on the other hand this was some sort of semi good confirmation of the range that I could compete at. I could've uploaded a better video and maybe I will later but I'd have to record that and I don't have equipment that would make good quality video. This quick video was made by a friend because I wanted to see what my backswing looked like. Sadly I used to be obsessed with that.

@FuzzyYellowBalls Thanks! that's a very kind guess. It were def not highlights, although half of the time I play lazier than this. Ofc forehand is my best shot but the rest of my game isn't a whole lot different. This was just the only video I have atm and was curious to see how people rate vs how I would self rate it without having an updated ranking.

btw if anyone sees suboptimal things in my tecnique on what I could work on further let me know :)
I'd put you at 4.0 until you get back into the groove..

I'm not a coach and I don't use your style of forehand, but I've watched a few modern forehand videos lately and it seems the pros point the head of the racket more toward the opponent on takeback to maybe get a more extreme sweeping motion down and through the ball, I noticed you have it straight up and down. Maybe that would add more topspin or power if you did that, maybe not.
 
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K1Y

Rookie
I'd put you at 4.0 until you get back into the groove..

I'm not a coach and I don't use your style of forehand, but I've watched a few modern forehand videos lately and it seems the pros point the head of the racket more toward the opponent on takeback to maybe get a more extreme sweeping motion down and through the ball, I noticed you have it straight up and down. Maybe that would add more topspin or power if you did that, maybe not.
thanks, appreciate it! Yes that's a good point I will def try that out and see how it feels
 

Morch Us

Professional
You don't look like a 3.0. But I am pretty sure you are going to have a tough time moving into the balls forward and cleaning up the opportunities. So your results will be skewed till you get enough match practice. (I woundn't be surprised if you lose to a consistent 3.5 with weaker shots than you).

By the way, in the three shots you hit, you tend to take "short steps" and pretty much stays along the baseline, which is pretty common for folks who mostly just "hits" and does not play matches.

So in summary, I would not be too obsessed with your "shot techniques" till you get your movement adapt for matches.

I looked at some charts and that would translate to an 3.0 NTRP. This rating is maybe not too accurate because I haven't played full time/competed in 9 years
 

optic yellow

Hall of Fame
Some 3.5s have a FH like that if they suck at everything else but otherwise is obvious 4.0 to 4.5 due to the smoothness and equal confidence displayed on high and medium height ball.
 

K1Y

Rookie
You don't look like a 3.0. But I am pretty sure you are going to have a tough time moving into the balls forward and cleaning up the opportunities. So your results will be skewed till you get enough match practice. (I woundn't be surprised if you lose to a consistent 3.5 with weaker shots than you).

By the way, in the three shots you hit, you tend to take "short steps" and pretty much stays along the baseline, which is pretty common for folks who mostly just "hits" and does not play matches.

So in summary, I would not be too obsessed with your "shot techniques" till you get your movement adapt for matches.
good insight. Yeah I mostly just "hit". What would be better than short steps? Where do I learn to move better? or does it come with match experience?
 

K1Y

Rookie
Some 3.5s have a FH like that if they suck at everything else but otherwise is obvious 4.0 to 4.5 due to the smoothness and equal confidence displayed on high and medium height ball.
I totally get what you mean. some 3.5 have really good fh tbh. Thanks for kind words sir.
 

optic yellow

Hall of Fame
good insight. Yeah I mostly just "hit". What would be better than short steps? Where do I learn to move better? or does it come with match experience?
It half looks like you're shuffling along the ground. Generally moving like that is to compensate for not trusting your footwork or sense of feet positioning enough to take fewer steps. You are basically just keeping the feet hyperactive so you can hedge until the last moment possible. I think footwork is mostly intuitive so probably better to just work on training drills for this and let your mind put it together by itself when you are hitting or playing a match.

I totally get what you mean. some 3.5 have really good fh tbh. Thanks for kind words sir.
You're welcome. And yes they do. Thankfully when you're playing them you're allowed to hit it to their backhand too :giggle:
 
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K1Y

Rookie
It half looks like you're shuffling along the ground. Generally moving like that is to compensate for not trusting your footwork or sense of feet positioning enough to take fewer steps. You are basically just keeping the feet hyperactive so you can hedge until the last moment possible. I think footwork is mostly intuitive so probably better to just work on training drills for this and let your mind put it together by itself when you are hitting or playing a match.


You're welcome. And yes they do. Thankfully when you're playing them you're allowed to hit it to their backhand too :giggle:
yes makes sense. I sort of shuffle outside of tennis too.. when I walk. But yeah maybe it has to do with ball recognition or not trusting enough. hedging is the right word indeed. Pretty sure I do that without thinking about it because I feel like I can adjust better. I'll keep it in mind. Didn't think of it but thats great insight
 

optic yellow

Hall of Fame
yes makes sense. I sort of shuffle outside of tennis too.. when I walk. But yeah maybe it has to do with ball recognition or not trusting enough. hedging is the right word indeed. Pretty sure I do that without thinking about it because I feel like I can adjust better. I'll keep it in mind. Didn't think of it but thats great insight
Thank you for the nice compliment! I think you are spot on with why you are doing it. Don't have much doubt with how you've responded to things so far that you'll improve it if you pay attention to it.
 
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Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
I know the title is ridiculous but wondering what people would guess just by watching me hit 3 forehands. Main question: what can I improve?

There have been several threads recently where the term 'forehand separation' was used and discussed in detail. It means the line between the two shoulders and the line between the two hips turn back and forth independently and if viewed from above would form an angle, the separation angle. That angle can be observed by your viewing videos of ATP forehands or WTA forehands.
Forum search: forehand separation
Member: Chas Tennis

When the shoulders line and hips line move together without much trunk twist you lose racket head speed. Sometimes I call that a 'barn door' forehand.

First, demo this to yourself slowly and carefully so as not to stress your back. Hold your arms straight out from your shoulders. Keep your pelvis still and twist your trunk slowly back and forth. The trunk bottom is still, at your pelvis, and your uppermost body at shoulders is turning back and forth, the axis is the spine. This paragraphs is not a tennis instruction, it is a demonstration of how your trunk can twist.

Now look for that trunk twist in TV broadcasts of ATP & WTA tennis matches. Now look at your forehand.

You can Google 'forehand separation'.
 
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RoddickAce

Hall of Fame
Caveat is that I'm not a coach and that it is pretty difficult to gauge with just 3 shots, but three quick things I spotted that could help with your forehand:

1. Loading of weight onto your right leg before exploding/launching with more weight transfer / trunk rotation on open stance forehands.
2. On neutral stance forehands to lean into your left leg and rotate your right leg after a slight lag/delay (rotating too early could lead to over-rotation and/or loss of power). On your third forehand your feet actually criss-cross, which would affect balance and weight transfer (i.e. pace) into the shot.
3. Using more of a loose wrist to achieve the wrist "lag" / "flip" and adopting a mindset of whipping the racquet through the ball, instead of guiding or pushing through the ball unless you are in a defensive situation.

Best of luck and happy hitting.
 

Fintft

Legend
You don't look like a 3.0. But I am pretty sure you are going to have a tough time moving into the balls forward and cleaning up the opportunities. So your results will be skewed till you get enough match practice. (I woundn't be surprised if you lose to a consistent 3.5 with weaker shots than you).

By the way, in the three shots you hit, you tend to take "short steps" and pretty much stays along the baseline, which is pretty common for folks who mostly just "hits" and does not play matches.

So in summary, I would not be too obsessed with your "shot techniques" till you get your movement adapt for matches.
I was also thinking, in my own minor ways, about the slow movement(via small steps), making him more of a 3.5-4.0, rather than a 4.0-4.5.
 
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K1Y

Rookie
I was also thinking, in my own minor ways, about the slow movement(via small steps), making him more of a 3.5-4.0, rather than a 4.0-4.5.
yes I would agree movement needs improvement. Thanks for confirming sir :)
 

K1Y

Rookie
There have been several threads recently where the term 'forehand separation' was used and discussed in detail. It means the line between the two shoulders and the line between the two hips turn back and forth independently and if viewed from above would form an angle, the separation angle. That angle can be observed by your viewing videos of ATP forehands or WTA forehands.
Forum search: forehand separation
Member: Chas Tennis

When the shoulders line and hips line move together without much trunk twist you lose racket head speed. Sometimes I call that a 'barn door' forehand.

First, demo this to yourself slowly and carefully so as not to stress your back. Hold your arms straight out from your shoulders. Keep your pelvis still and twist your trunk slowly back and forth. The bottom is still, at your pelvis, and your uppermost body at shoulders is turning back and forth, the axis is the spine.

Now look for that trunk twist in TV broadcasts of ATP & WTA tennis matches. Now look at your forehand. These paragraphs are not an instruction, it is a demonstration of how your trunk can twist and how to connect it to tennis.

You can Google 'forehand separation'.
thanks for taking the time and writing it out in good detail. You make a very good point I don't think about when hitting. I don't see that angle either when I watch the video back. I will read the thread and do some research on it. thanks alot for bringing it to my attention.

p.s. I googled it quick and came across this rick macci vid. I know who he is but havent watched all his videos. Is this the same thing youre talking about? ->
 

K1Y

Rookie
Caveat is that I'm not a coach and that it is pretty difficult to gauge with just 3 shots, but three quick things I spotted that could help with your forehand:

1. Loading of weight onto your right leg before exploding/launching with more weight transfer / trunk rotation on open stance forehands.
2. On neutral stance forehands to lean into your left leg and rotate your right leg after a slight lag/delay (rotating too early could lead to over-rotation and/or loss of power). On your third forehand your feet actually criss-cross, which would affect balance and weight transfer (i.e. pace) into the shot.
3. Using more of a loose wrist to achieve the wrist "lag" / "flip" and adopting a mindset of whipping the racquet through the ball, instead of guiding or pushing through the ball unless you are in a defensive situation.

Best of luck and happy hitting.
very very good points. I will copy these to my notes and focus on them next time on the court. Yeah agree the crisscross is bad I think that happens because my feet are not wide apart enough and/or I'm not balanced. Thanks! Appreciate it.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
thanks for taking the time and writing it out in good detail. You make a very good point I don't think about when hitting. I don't see that angle either when I watch the video back. I will read the thread and do some research on it. thanks alot for bringing it to my attention.

p.s. I googled it quick and came across this rick macci vid. I know who he is but havent watched all his videos. Is this the same thing youre talking about? ->
That's it and I'm glad to have the Macci video.

The separation angle is perfectly viewed from above the player. Unfortunately, camera coverage from above is rare and hard to find for the ATP & WTA.

I believe that orienting the racket face for impact to aim is a very strong thing once learned, and may be hard to change. You will more orient your racket face with both an uppermost body turn usually followed by shoulder joint motion. Both motions turn the upper arm, one from a spine axis and the other from the shoulder joint as an axis. The forehand with more significant separation and uppermost body turn requires a change in aiming.

Estimate how much the uppermost body turns for the ATP & WTA forehands. What angle? Watch separately the line between the two shoulders and the line of the upper arm. Notice when the shoulder joint is used by how the upper arm moves.

Be careful on adding more separation as it may be too stressful for some people. Djokovic is a good example of separation. But he is extremely flexible and his maximum range of motion is too much for most people.
 
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