Chair umpire refuses to shake Malisse's hand post-match

Moose Malloy

G.O.A.T.
A tense match between Belgium’s Xavier Malisse and Spain’s Guillermo Garcia-Lopez was decided in favour of the X-Man by two sets to one. Malisse and Garcia-Lopez both exchanged heated words with each other and chair umpire James Keothavong in a match which was high on passion but perhaps lacking a little in sportsmanship.

Malisse made the best possible start, winning the toss and choosing to receive before breaking Garcia-Lopez twice to race to a 3-0 lead. Garcia-Lopez pegged one break back, but couldn’t make any further progress against the powerful Belgian who took the first set 6-4.

Malisse’s famous temper reared its head even when he was in control, he fussed when Garcia-Lopez delayed his serve by asking for a towel, then when receiving he poked his head through the advertising hoardings surrounding the court to tell people in the corridor behind it to be quiet.

Many of the decisive points were won by Malisse when he advanced to the net, as a volleyer of the ball he’s underrated, and showed great hands at the net and in mid-court, his experience allowing him to pick the right times to nip in and seal the deal.

The second set went with serve all the way to 6-5 to Garcia-Lopez. But there was no shortage of incident. Malisse made inroads into Garcia-Lopez’s service every single game – not one game was won to love by the Spaniard in the second set, and at 5-5 a mighty battle ensued as Malisse pressed for a break. A contentious line call was disputed by Malisse, who seems to be very much a man to bear grudges – whilst on court at least. Garcia-Lopez wasn’t all smiles either, a long rally had to be replayed when a groundstroke of his was called out then overruled by the chair umpire – Garcia-Lopez wanted the point. Garcia-Lopez valiantly held though, and got his reward in the next game as he broke from deuce in the next game to take the 2nd set 7-5 and level the match at one apiece.

Malisse felt aggrieved that he had lost that set, and was upset again at 1-1 and 2-2 in the final set, arguing loudly with the umpire. There was a lot of vocal support from a female member of Garcia-Lopez’s entourage, and Malisse comically asked if the lady was his babysitter.

The break came for Malisse midway through the final set. Again he showed his skills at the net to win several points in succession and then secured a game with a beautifully crafted spinning drop-shot that Santoro would be proud of.

Malisse sulks and glares, he pouts and gesticulates, and he mutters and curses – but the crowd lapped it up, it all added to the live tennis experience. Games went with serve after the break, and Malisse sent down an ace at match point to end a bad tempered contest. Chair umpire James Keothavong refused to shake hands with Malisse, who had berated him throughout the match. People expect tennis players to be feisty, and Malisse pushed that to the limit, but in general the crowd supported him – but James Keothavong was booed for not shaking hands at the end.

It would be unfair not to mention the fact that Garcia-Lopez lost his temper several times during the match too – it’s just that Malisse is such a showman when he does so. Malisse kicked his racquet in two during the match, and Garcia-Lopez levelled things up after the match had finished, and stormed off down the tunnel.

Malisse defeats Garcia-Lopez 6-4, 5-7, 6-4 and advances to the second round where he will face Juan Martin del Potro.

http://www.10sballs.com/2013/06/10/no-love-lost-as-xavier-malisse-beats-guillermo-garcia-lopez/
 

woodrow1029

Hall of Fame
Woodrow, should chair umpires always shake hands irrespective of what happened?
There have been a few times I have wanted to refuse, once was with Malisse. But, it's like, what's the point of refusing sometimes? It's just gonna turn the crowd against you, and you have to get back up there later in the day or in the tournament, and they remember. But, if you get that irritated about it, then you don't have to shake hands. I have seen it a couple times in my life.
 

Goosehead

Legend
There have been a few times I have wanted to refuse, once was with Malisse. But, it's like, what's the point of refusing sometimes? It's just gonna turn the crowd against you, and you have to get back up there later in the day or in the tournament, and they remember. But, if you get that irritated about it, then you don't have to shake hands. I have seen it a couple times in my life.

go on..admit it, sometimes when you were the ump you thought that some player was such an a-hole that you really wanted him/her to lose the match :twisted::twisted:
 

Legend of Borg

G.O.A.T.
There have been a few times I have wanted to refuse, once was with Malisse. But, it's like, what's the point of refusing sometimes? It's just gonna turn the crowd against you, and you have to get back up there later in the day or in the tournament, and they remember. But, if you get that irritated about it, then you don't have to shake hands. I have seen it a couple times in my life.

Who's the most famous player you've umpired for?
 

TTMR

Hall of Fame
That was unfair for him.....it should have been a point warning not a disqualification.

That woman was stupid for asking for him to be disqualified....most likely he was swearing at himself for losing a point.

I give Malisse a lot of credit along with Serena and Roddick. All three have more than once stood up to the oppressive over-officiating and aggressive game-calling of tennis' umpire regime. McEnroe is also good, always promoting a "let the players play" approach. The umpires' tyrannical interpretation of the rules has decided tennis outcomes all too often (eg. the RG SF Nadal owes to Pascal Maria). Umpires should never impose themselves on the game. It's time for a clearing out.
 

eliars

Hall of Fame
I give Malisse a lot of credit along with Serena and Roddick. All three have more than once stood up to the oppressive over-officiating and aggressive game-calling of tennis' umpire regime. McEnroe is also good, always promoting a "let the players play" approach. The umpires' tyrannical interpretation of the rules has decided tennis outcomes all too often (eg. the RG SF Nadal owes to Pascal Maria). Umpires should never impose themselves on the game. It's time for a clearing out.

I like apples, blueberries and pistachio icecream.

Keep up the poasting.
 
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