Cheaters in tennis

TTMR

Hall of Fame
#1
I've never understood quite why people get so incensed over the odd bad line call or strategic hook. I mean, I understand it on a primal level, of course, but on an intellectual level, I don't. Tennis is a game. Like most games, the rules are arbitrary--they're man-made. They're not divine laws, not even run of the mill regular political laws. People get more incensed over a bad line call than they do over seeing someone speed or drive home above the BAC after a party, both of which are against the law. Even under a "do unto others..." ethical framework, I suspect most cheaters pass that test. They probably expect and even anticipate the opponent doing the same to them and accept it as part of the game, or any game, for that matter.

I'm reminded of that Star Trek movie, where Kirk relates a story from his Academy days about a simulation where he had to save the Kobayashi Maru. The Academy wrote that simulation as a "no-win scenario" with the Kobayashi always destroyed no matter what the cadet does. Kirk re-programmed the Academy computer so that the mission was winnable. What he did was against Academy rules--he cheated--and in principle should have been expelled, but instead he received a commendation for original thinking. Why is Kirk lauded as a hero rather than condemned as a cheater? Isn't a crafty tennis player an original thinker, too?

Something to think about.
 
#5
I've never understood quite why people get so incensed over the odd bad line call or strategic hook.
I'm with you on the "odd bad line call", but not with you on the strategic hook.

The first one I take as a missed call but with good intentions. We all miss calls... most of us don't do it on purpose.
The strategic hook is cheating.
 
#7
The reason is that the scores of these USTA matches are posted online for all to see. We are social creatures and the power of public shaming vs public praise is enormous. It’s like taking a college test and posting everyone’s grade on a public bulletin board. Even matches you played 3 years ago are easily visible on the USTA site. And now not only are match results posted publically, but individual player ratings are posted on TR and TLS down to the 2nd decimal point. This means that even losing 6-3 instead of 6-2 matters. This makes every point of every game crucial. And it creates the incentive to manipulate scores. I can’t tell you how often I have played a match where a 6–3 set was reported as 6-2 or 6-4 based on how the opposing player or captain wanted the online rating to look and I didn’t find out about it until days later when it is too late to change. At that point it’s just your word against theirs.

Some people get a huge adrenaline rush out of this and it becomes almost addictive. Others find it off putting.
 
#8
This feels like I'm being trolled, but I'll give it a go.

Why is Kirk lauded as a hero rather than condemned as a cheater? Isn't a crafty tennis player an original thinker, too?
This is not an analogous situation in any meaningful way, and I expect you know that. I'll move on to the serious things.

I've never understood quite why people get so incensed over the odd bad line call or strategic hook.
I can't speak for how mad the people you're seeing are getting. I can posit that people get more angry in a relatively unimportant situation because of that very reason. If there's nothing serious on the line, why disrupt the entertainment being had with cheating? It seems that is plausible at least.

People get more incensed over a bad line call than they do over seeing someone speed or drive home above the BAC after a party, both of which are against the law.
I reject the hypothesis that most people get more upset over a line call than drunk driving. However, let's take speeding over cheating. In a situation where you're cheated out of a line call, you have been directly impacted by the rule breaking. When someone is speeding, you're not being harmed, and it's possible (probable) no one will be harmed. The involvement of a victim always plays into the "interpretation" of a crime.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
#9
There are degrees of cheaters. Most it is not a big deal and ultimately makes little difference in the end result of the match. Against these you smile and nod and move on. Against those that are systematic and obvious ... they will illicit sometimes a very strong response.

There is one player in the local league that I would seriously consider defaulting the court if she is my opponent. It is just that bad. At districts last year officials were called to camp at her court and deservedly so. In her case a combination of insanely bad line calls, arguing over the score, arguing on out calls you make, attempting to call hindrances for overhead birds or road noises and in every league match will dispute the scores with the LLC .... and she is never right, just trying to eke out a few more games on several courts. (have let folks know against her team you need to have each player sign the scorecard before you leave the court and hand it to me with the signatures .... absolutely ridiculous)
 
#11
I've never understood quite why people get so incensed over the odd bad line call or strategic hook. I mean, I understand it on a primal level, of course, but on an intellectual level, I don't. Tennis is a game. Like most games, the rules are arbitrary--they're man-made. They're not divine laws, not even run of the mill regular political laws. People get more incensed over a bad line call than they do over seeing someone speed or drive home above the BAC after a party, both of which are against the law. Even under a "do unto others..." ethical framework, I suspect most cheaters pass that test. They probably expect and even anticipate the opponent doing the same to them and accept it as part of the game, or any game, for that matter.
It's basic prisoners dilemma. Cheating is the optimal solution whether or not your opponent follows the rules. Just refer to the prisoners dilemma for the complete analysis if you need it.

This is overridden in the case of 3rd party enforcement of the rules. This can take the form of direct enforcement (umpires) or indirect enforcement. Indirect enforcement would be if you belong to a club for example and by getting the reputation of a cheater, you will be ostracized by the group. In which case, cheating (or at least having the reputation of being a cheater) is not in you best interests.
 
#12
It's basic prisoners dilemma. Cheating is the optimal solution whether or not your opponent follows the rules. Just refer to the prisoners dilemma for the complete analysis if you need it.

This is overridden in the case of 3rd party enforcement of the rules. This can take the form of direct enforcement (umpires) or indirect enforcement. Indirect enforcement would be if you belong to a club for example and by getting the reputation of a cheater, you will be ostracized by the group. In which case, cheating (or at least having the reputation of being a cheater) is not in you best interests.
I played a former prisoner at state last year. He was a cheater too.
 
#15
I had brain surgery the other day, my doctor had cheated on all his exams his whole life.

Why am I here, uh there was something on my mind, I wanted to point out, uh

You live by a code, and affected by the code others live by. Do your part.
 
#17
I had brain surgery the other day, my doctor had cheated on all his exams his whole life.

Why am I here, uh there was something on my mind, I wanted to point out, uh

You live by a code, and affected by the code others live by. Do your part.
Cheated on his exams.. how'd he do in his labs? lol
 
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